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  1. #1
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    Default Trying to decide upgrade direction for PC

    I think I am reaching the point of finally upgrading my desktop. I've not done so in eons.. the cpu is a first gen core i7. Apart from ssd , I've scarcely touched it. It's just always worked and these days I almost never play games or anything that would require it.

    Mainly where I'm running into trouble is editing with Premiere. I've upgraded to the subscription version but my machine can't even handle basic editing with proxy enabled without stuttering and crashing at random intervals.

    I'm just not sure if I should stay on the workstation path and upgrade to a Xeon w/Quadro or play it 'safe' and build a more general purpose machine with Core i7/Geforce. I don't want to foreclose options like gaming entirely, although I suspect that will continue to be minimal.

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    Cool

    My go to solution is Lenovo ThinkPad workstation editions (W520, W530, W540, W541, P50, P51, P52). Those can be found (depending on the condition, age, specifications) from $200+ to way beyond. But those work really nicely.

    Especially with SSD and plenty of RAM. Even my W510s run very nicely with SSDs and plenty of RAM.

    W520s with SSD and 2860QM, 2920XM and 2960XM are also very nicely performing machines: 8 years later.

    Imagine what a W541 or P52 could do!

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    What do you have exactly (RAM, CPU, GPU)?

    I would so get an AMD 8 core system with 32GB or more of RAM and a good SSD plus a midrange GPU and call it a day.
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    I switched to AMD a long time ago. Quite frankly, my old AM3+ 4-core setup does pretty much everything I need (I'm not into video processing). But it was the case back then that AMD generally had more bang-for-the-buck than Intel systems did.

    Is this still true?

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    Given the suggestions https://www.pugetsystems.com/recomme...ecommendations I would try to find a quality motherboard supporting 128 GB of ECC memory and then buy the matching CPU. Intel and AMD are close enough in performance that sale pricing will change the optimum chip. I admit, when I got an offer for the 8-core current AMD product for less than $200, I was very tempted to pick it up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    What do you have exactly (RAM, CPU, GPU)?

    I would so get an AMD 8 core system with 32GB or more of RAM and a good SSD plus a midrange GPU and call it a day.
    Right now I have an Core i7 920, 24gb ddr3, and a base (but new) nvidia quadro p620. I've got an intel s3100 1TB ssd. It's all kind of a mishmash.. I used it for really basic stuff before and never upgraded.

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    I'd be happy to just go up a few generations.. newer but not bleeding edge.. I find generally it's a bit more same cost wise to stay a step.or too back.

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    Intel's fastest quad core chips are about twice as fast as the i7-920. (25% better clock for clock, 50% higher clocks). Currently, AMD is a smidge slower clock for clock than Intel. Moving up to more cores is cheap though. This suggests that for less than $1000, it should be easy to put together motherboard, CPU, and RAM that will be 4+ times as fast in Premiere.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    I think I am reaching the point of finally upgrading my desktop. I've not done so in eons.. the cpu is a first gen core i7. Apart from ssd , I've scarcely touched it. It's just always worked and these days I almost never play games or anything that would require it. Mainly where I'm running into trouble is editing with Premiere. I've upgraded to the subscription version but my machine can't even handle basic editing with proxy enabled without stuttering and crashing at random intervals.
    This is exactly the situation I was in 2 years ago and have relevant experience to share, including Premiere speedup. I was on an i7-980 and upgraded to an i7-8700k. Both at stock speeds, the 8700k is about twice as fast in some benchmarks, like FFMPEG h.264 encoding.

    Premiere uses the embedded GPU in many desktop intel chips to perform accelerated h.264 and h.265 decoding and encoding if you turn on the embedded GPU in your BIOS (some people turn it off when they add a gaming card). This makes it possible to edit 4k h.264/h.265 without needing proxies, although sometimes I do edit with proxies if I'm trying to turn a 60-minute piece of footage into a meaningful 90 seconds, which is a lot of seeking around, logging clips, etc. I also have two nvidia GPUs in my system, which greatly accelerate NeatVideo noise reduction (it's entirely handled by those GPUs).

    A youtube video from a few months ago demonstrated that a 32-core AMD Threadripper 3970X can outperform an intel setup using software alone (there's no embedded GPU accelerated encoding/decoding in Premiere when run on AMD). It's a monster, but costs more, so it's up to you. Another alternative, if you don't want to go Intel, is DaVince Resolve, which accelerates everything using whatever GPU(s) are installed in the system.

    All this being said: I was editing 4k on my i7-920 using 1280x720 cineform proxies just fine after ensuring all my footage and caches were on an SSD drive. So if editing 4k is all you want to do on your existing hardware, $100 for an SSD will cover it. The export will take several hours, but there's no reason your edits have to.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by falter View Post
    Mainly where I'm running into trouble is editing with Premiere. I've upgraded to the subscription version but my machine can't even handle basic editing with proxy enabled without stuttering and crashing at random intervals.
    My recommendation would be to go Ryzen, probably the Ryzen7 3700 or 3800, and then throw in a GTX-1060 or higher so you have access to the Cuda acceleration in Premier. This would be your best bang for the buck when it comes to video editing, and will outperform most Intel Core i7 machines out there at ~60% the cost. RAM wise, get the fastest RAM your budget and board would support, and IMO more than 32Gb would be a waste.

    Not only would that config get you a damned good machine for Premiere, you also end up with a solid general use machine that can do some decent gaming on the occasion that you want to do so.

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