Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Best way to tackle soldered in ODIN chip

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    3,455

    Default Best way to tackle soldered in ODIN chip

    Ok, so in your opinions, what would be the best way to tackle this soldered in ODIN clock/battery chip? I tried unsoldering one on a similar board a way while back and wound up pulling off traces while pulling out the chip. As you can see, it is sandwiched between components, so I don't see any good way to cut it out. I might try cutting it open and wiring in a battery, but room could still be a factor and I'll have to check if I have all the tools needed - at least I have some dead pulled Dallas/Odin chips I can practice on first.

    5x86 odin.jpg

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    34,147
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Seems like someone did just this in 2015. Looks like the same motherobard.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Location
    Marietta, GA
    Posts
    3,455

    Default

    Thanks for pointing that out. So using a dremel to remove the top and expose the built in battery is one option.

    Yea, that does look like the same motherboard.

  4. #4

    Default

    the best way is to reflow all the pins first with an iron and then use a vacuum desoldering tool to clear them

    that may require buying a vacuum desoldering pump (I recommend the ZD-915)

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    ... with an iron and then use a vacuum desoldering tool to clear them
    that may require buying a vacuum desoldering pump (I recommend the ZD-915)
    Why an electric one? I use a hand one most of the time like this one. If you don't desolder that much, it is good enough.
    With kind regards / met vriendelijke groet, Ruud Baltissen

    www.baltissen.org

  6. #6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ruud View Post
    Why an electric one? I use a hand one most of the time like this one. If you don't desolder that much, it is good enough.
    I've used both, the electric one is an order of magnitude better for evacuating difficult joints. I would NEVER go back to the manual one if you paid me

  7. #7

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    I've used both, the electric one is an order of magnitude better for evacuating difficult joints. I would NEVER go back to the manual one if you paid me
    Agreed. The units are not cheap (in order of +$1000 new, significantly less on e-bay), but if you ever need a desoldering job done, it's the best way to do it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Augusta, Georgia, USA
    Posts
    757

    Default

    If you don't mind ugly and have a rotary bit tool, you can grind it down from the side or top and get access to the battery pins. In this orientation, it will be near the PCI slot on pins 16 and 20. Connect a new coin cell battery to these pins (probably best to disconnect existing battery first) and you will bring it back to life.

    But yes, if you want to just replace it, it's best to have a desoldering pump. I used a blue sucker for so many years and when I got an actual vacuum, I felt like it was cheating because it SO much quicker and easier.

    To avoid pulling up pads and traces, NEVER pry the chip off the board. Make sure each pin on the chip is freely moving in the hole and wiggle the chip gently back and forth until it falls off the board. If you have to pull or pry it, you will be sorry.

    I worked with a guy back in the 80's that would use a heat gun and just heat the area on the board on the back until the chip fell out and then clean the holes out, but this seemed to be a brutal method. I watched him replace Agnus sockets on Amiga boards many times this way. The board would actually warp way out of shape and I couldn't believe it would still work after the surgery, but he was an electronics veteran and knew what he was doing and when the board cooled it went right back into shape and worked. This was the kind of guy who would do this procedure with a cigarette hanging out of his mouth the whole time- squinting from the smoke getting in his eyes.
    Last edited by rittwage; March 15th, 2020 at 09:23 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    34,147
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    I'm still in favor of mangling the chip potting rather than replacing it. The danger of pulling out vias or traces outweighs any "doesn't look so cool" looks when grinding into the epoxy. If you screw the carving job up, you can still remove the chip and go from there.

    If you're careful with the 16 and 20 hack, you can glue a coin cell holder to the top and things look pretty much normal.

  10. #10

    Default

    there is no danger of pulling traces or vias if you use the proper tools and technique

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •