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Thread: Uefi/safe boot/legacy

  1. #11
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    Allegedly you can fenagle w10 and linux. Just don't ask me. To me the whole idea of running linux is to ditch windows, 10 in particular. My main laptop still has 10, and I'm going to leave it that way. But I don't use it on the internet. Never have. Schmott, no? I had to update my .net framework to get handbrake to install. I downloaded it to my phone. Then uploaded itto my lt. Works well.

    I don't hate linux, quite the contrary. Well let's just leave specific emotions out of it and say I'm devoted to linux. Sometimes it just don't love me back. I've used older versions of Ubuntu. Then when I upgraded it my blood pressure was affected. I've never actually installed debian I don't think. Maybe that's the way I should go.

    Can you actually buy a book on Debian in the last 15 years. Not that much would revelatory I don't think. Just wondering.

  2. #12
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    I don't 'hate' Linux- it just doesn't do things I like to do. It seems you have for 'force' it to do this or that. Now, if I had a Linux server setting off in a corner somewhere, no problem, as it could dish out files all days and I wouldn't to fuss with it. You can mix W10 and Linux on the same PC but I wouldn't co-mingle files on the same HDD. You need a seperate HDD and maybe dual boot the lashup. It seems that some folks like to bitch about Windows because it seems like the thing to do. When it's tuned up it runs pretty good and I really don't have many complaints once one learns how to deal with One Drive and Cortana and I think I've mastered that.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  3. #13
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    I didn't mean to start a "I hate (fill in OS name here)" thread. I just found tipc's comment about Linux and mobile phones a little strange.

  4. #14

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    And that's putting it rather mildly.
    PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

  5. #15
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    I don't hate Linux. I actually love it but it doesn't always reciprocate. I don't hate Windows, I just hate ... I'll leave it alone.

    My newish coworker is a gamer I just found out. And his gaming pc has an i5. I have to ask him why. Many gamers prefer amd. But for a little twist and turn I'd be running amd also (do on half my laptops, but those are dime store cpu's). And I got an equivalent of a 1000$ xeon for 200$. So if I keep that mobo (i.e no one wants to buy it), that should keep me for several years. I just hate clutter. I always feel I need to jetison stuff. Trim down and stay that way. For a while anyway.

    I just wished I would have grabbed a blue Bitfenix Aegis when I had the chance. Stunning uatx case. Damn.

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    I didn't mean to start a "I hate (fill in OS name here)" thread. I just found tipc's comment about Linux and mobile phones a little strange.
    I'd ask why but I'm on 2 hours of sleep. And I endeavor to watch 3 episodes of the Sarah Connor Chronicles tonight.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    You can't mix UEFI/EFI with MBR/NTFS and expect it to come together as one happy family. If you do, you'll end up with a kludge and your backup/restore functions just went down the tubes. If you have W7/W8/W10 and are using a UEFI BIOS, make sure you know which direction you want to take and carefully map out a plan.
    I think you're a bit confused as to what UEFI and EFI are. They're not the same thing and using them interchangeably is incorrect.

    EFI was a firmware spec released with the Intel Itanium processor. UEFI came much later, and is managed by a consortium of independent companies. Intel did contribute the EFI spec to the UEFI forum, but EFI is not UEFI, or the other way around.

    You also seem to be confused as to how UEFI works. The reason that a classic MBR Windows installation won't boot on an UEFI BIOS in Secure Boot mode is because the special boot loader required is missing. UEFI requires a special boot partition with a UEFI boot loader to boot into an operating system. UEFI can boot into an older MS-DOS style MBR partition if you have UEFI-CSM enabled in the firmware. It is possible to convert a MBR OS install partition into a GPT partition, and create the special partition and boot loader so the previously MBR OS install can properly boot in Secure Boot mode, but it's an extensive process and shouldn't be done unless absolutely required.

    If you're migrating an old MBR OS install, make sure the new machine is able to use UEFI-CSM mode and set it to that mode and disable secure boot. Most DIY motherboard vendors support this, but SIs like Dell/HP, YMMV. I've seen badly implemented UEFI firmware where it was impossible to very difficult to enable UEFI-CSM. I've also seen it purposefully missing, like on x86 tablets or laptops.

    UEFI can work fine with MBR boot partitions, for now as long as UEFI-CSM exists. UEFI-CSM may be in trouble though, as Intel has stated that they will discontinue support for it at the end of 2020, making the future of OSes that require MBR uncertain.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    I don't 'hate' Linux- it just doesn't do things I like to do. It seems you have for 'force' it to do this or that.
    Windows 10 is no different, except it's a constant battle.

    You have to force Windows 10 to disable Windows Update. You have to hack around in the registry and download sketchy files from the internet to do the same on Windows 10 home. You have to force Windows 10 to stop spying on everything you do, the whole OS is one big piece of malware and people are still finding new telemetry code all the time, especially in new Windows Updates.

    People have become content with letting Microsoft get away with whatever they want, including having unlimited access to your most personal information. People were outraged when they found out the NSA was spying on citizens, but they basically don't care Microsoft is doing worse and selling it to 3rd parties.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    I think you're a bit confused as to what UEFI and EFI are. They're not the same thing and using them interchangeably is incorrect.

    EFI was a firmware spec released with the Intel Itanium processor. UEFI came much later, and is managed by a consortium of independent companies. Intel did contribute the EFI spec to the UEFI forum, but EFI is not UEFI, or the other way around.

    You also seem to be confused as to how UEFI works. The reason that a classic MBR Windows installation won't boot on an UEFI BIOS in Secure Boot mode is because the special boot loader required is missing. UEFI requires a special boot partition with a UEFI boot loader to boot into an operating system. UEFI can boot into an older MS-DOS style MBR partition if you have UEFI-CSM enabled in the firmware. It is possible to convert a MBR OS install partition into a GPT partition, and create the special partition and boot loader so the previously MBR OS install can properly boot in Secure Boot mode, but it's an extensive process and shouldn't be done unless absolutely required.

    If you're migrating an old MBR OS install, make sure the new machine is able to use UEFI-CSM mode and set it to that mode and disable secure boot. Most DIY motherboard vendors support this, but SIs like Dell/HP, YMMV. I've seen badly implemented UEFI firmware where it was impossible to very difficult to enable UEFI-CSM. I've also seen it purposefully missing, like on x86 tablets or laptops.

    UEFI can work fine with MBR boot partitions, for now as long as UEFI-CSM exists. UEFI-CSM may be in trouble though, as Intel has stated that they will discontinue support for it at the end of 2020, making the future of OSes that require MBR uncertain.
    I'm not confused and I kind of know how it works. Re-read if you will: I didn't have a problem booting, I had the problem with the Windows backup image not loading and/or not being recognized by my UEFI. It's not rocket science and the problem is now fixed - at least on my PC. Also - "UEFI is the new replacement for BIOS; the EFI is a name/label of the partition where UEFI boot files are stored". And BTW, CSM is set in my box. Please, in the future don't be so quick call people out until you fully understand the problem. is the new replacement for BIO with BIOS, but much more flexible and allows multiple boot loaders to co-exist.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    I'm not confused and I kind of know how it works.
    You were ambiguously conflating two standards in a way that makes no sense.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    Please, in the future don't be so quick call people out until you fully understand the problem.
    I do understand the problem, and if you carefully read my post, I explain why your situation happens and how to go about fixing it, for other people.

    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    but much more flexible and allows multiple boot loaders to co-exist.
    UEFI does not allow multiple boot loaders to coexist, unless by that you mean using the firmware boot device selection menu to select different boot devices, which was already possible on systems that used MBR.

    If you have multiple UEFI operating systems, you must pick which OS bootloader you want to use to manage everything.

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