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Thread: Macintosh garden is missing something; need help with 68k mac os 8 floppies

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by olePigeon View Post
    You need DiskCopy 6 for .dsk and newer .img formats. It will also allow you to mount disk images to the desktop so they can be used (mostly) like normal disks. DiskCopy 4.2, however, is the preferred choice for making disk images because it also records the Tag information (which includes checksums, byte information, etc. that can useful for various reasons.) DiskCopy 6 doesn't record that information. So it's good to have both version on your computer.

    If you have any machines running System 6, you'll want MountImage and a copy of ResEdit to change the .dsk file type and creator code so it'll recognize it. This will allow you to mount disk images to the desktop under System 6 since DiskCopy 6 doesn't run under System 6.
    Thanks Olepigeon. Thats good info. If I don't want to mount the disk images under system 6 but instead just make the actual disks (for a system 6 mac) from a system 7 or system 8 machine would that still work ok If I use diskcopy 6 on its own? I take it mountimage and resEdit are specifid to system 6?

  2. #12

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    Yeah, Disk Copy 6 is fine for creating floppies for any system. MountImage and the ResEdit trick are specific to System 6. The .dsk files won't have the correct Type or Creator codes, so you'd need to modify the file so that MountImage can recognize them and know to open them.

    Also, FloppyEmu can work with both Disk Copy and raw .dsk images, too. So if you pick one of those up eventually, you can utilize all those imaged directly via FloppyEmu.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by olePigeon View Post
    Yeah, Disk Copy 6 is fine for creating floppies for any system. MountImage and the ResEdit trick are specific to System 6. The .dsk files won't have the correct Type or Creator codes, so you'd need to modify the file so that MountImage can recognize them and know to open them.

    Also, FloppyEmu can work with both Disk Copy and raw .dsk images, too. So if you pick one of those up eventually, you can utilize all those imaged directly via FloppyEmu.
    I own a floppy emu. version 2. I use it for my apple II stuff. I suppose I can try it on these .dsk files. I downloaded diskcopy 6 and was able to get 2 of the .dsk files to work. The rest are still a mystery.

    Edit: to be honest with you the floppy emu isnt a good solution in this case. Alot of the machines dont have the external floppy port and having to connect it in place of the internal floppy defeats the purpose.
    Last edited by VERAULT; April 5th, 2020 at 06:36 AM.

  4. #14

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    Yeah, it can be a bit of a chore without an external floppy port. However, in a pinch, it can mount a pesky .dsk and allow you to make a new workable disk image.

  5. #15

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    Just to pile on - yes, for writing classic Mac disk images, you'll need both Disk Copy 4.2 and 6.1.

    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    With all do respect... Who the hell could have afforded one back in the day?
    Plenty of people? Macs weren't outrageously expensive. The Macintosh Classic released in 1990 cost $999, which was cheaper than many PCs of the time. The entire point of the "Performa" line was to be cheap home Macs. Oh, they had plenty of expensive models, too. But there were cheap Macs.

    Heck, the iMac upon its release was a cheap powerful home computer. Computers under $1000 were not common, and those that existed tended to be 2-3 generation old systems. On the PC side, the Pentium II was current, the Pentium MMX the "mid-range" model; low-end $100 systems used original Pentiums. The iMac used the same CPU, barely slower, than the high end Power Macintosh. Ironically, it made the rest of the Macintosh lineup obsolete instantly - Power Mac G3 and iMac is all that mattered any more.
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  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous Freak View Post
    Plenty of people? Macs weren't outrageously expensive. The Macintosh Classic released in 1990 cost $999, which was cheaper than many PCs of the time.
    It was cheaper and more useless than any other PC or Macintosh at the time. The Classic was basically a further cost reduced Mac Plus with 1/2 MB of RAM (using a proprietary, expensive and hard to find expansion board), a superdrive, a 40 MB hard drive and the same tired old 68000 at 8 MHz. The machine made little sense, bringing the 68000 out of retirement for a new design when every other compact mac had moved on to faster 68030 CPUs. Since everything was integrated on the logic board, it was impossible to upgrade the machine. This was around the time when System 7 was released, and this machine had no hope of running it, being stuck with System 5 or 6.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous Freak View Post
    The entire point of the "Performa" line was to be cheap home Macs. Oh, they had plenty of expensive models, too. But there were cheap Macs.
    Most of the Performa models were horrible designs borrowed from other lines in the Mac II, LC, Quadra and PowerPC families. They also used nonsensical naming schemes that more often denoted software packages rather than physical machine specs. Like the Performa 588CD is a far better machine than the 600CD. The former has a 68LC040 CPU and the latter is based on a Mac IIvx with a 32 MHz 68030 on a 16 MHz bus and no cache, making it slower than an LC III. There were 60+ machines in the Performa line and many of them were the exact same machine with different software.

    Other horrible designs like the 200 and 400 series (except the 46x) had a 32 bit CPU on a 16 bit bus with an artificial memory limit in the hardware. The 600/600CD was essentially a IIvx with no cache and a 32 MHz 68030. The crippled bus made it slower than an LC III at 25 MHz. Then there is the 52xx/53xx and 6xxx sereies (except the 6360) where they took a 68040 logic board and jimmy rigged a PowerPC 60x CPU on it. So you had a CPU with a 64 bit bus crippled to a 32 bit bus, and further crippled by a 68040 bus emulator for some devices, and a further 68030 bus emulator hanging off that for the slower devices. They had no hardware serial ports and the machines tended to be very unstable, requiring system updates to partially fix.

    Quote Originally Posted by Anonymous Freak View Post
    Heck, the iMac upon its release was a cheap powerful home computer. Computers under $1000 were not common, and those that existed tended to be 2-3 generation old systems. On the PC side, the Pentium II was current, the Pentium MMX the "mid-range" model; low-end $100 systems used original Pentiums. The iMac used the same CPU, barely slower, than the high end Power Macintosh. Ironically, it made the rest of the Macintosh lineup obsolete instantly - Power Mac G3 and iMac is all that mattered any more.
    While the iMac was a novel idea, it was ruined by Jobs, like the compact Macs a decade prior. The early tray loading iMacs had high failure rates from design faults and capacitor issues. Later models still had significant problems due to heat because of the hot vacuum tube and poor ventilation. The eMac G4 is what the iMac G3 should have been, it has a proper cooling system and far fewer failures than the preceding design.

    tl;dr, There were cheap Apple machines, but in almost all cases, they were compromised designs that weren't worth the money they sold them for.

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