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Thread: CD/DVD drive for retro usage

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
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    I have seen a very cracked DVD break inside an optical drive before but never had a good one break or crack.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

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    LG GCE-8525B 52x 32x 52x
    Results: NOT USABLE FOR RETRO

    Type: PC IDE

    Basically the same as the 40x 12x 40x model, but worse (from a vintage perspective). This is an 52x writer, althrough i dont remember writing above (or below) 16x with it, and actually it uses a CAV/PCAV writing and the speed of the writing is very random.

    CD RW: the drive is capable to burn cd-rw-s below 10x, and the rw-s burned with this are well readable on pc disc drives, but NOT on first generation of cd drives. The manual says it can burn RW-s at 4x, i only vaguely remember if this is true or not, as i didnt used the drive for years.

    CD read speed: 52x. Instant Megumin level CD explosion for every injured 1990s cd!

    CD writing: The smallest cd-r writing speed the manual says is 8x, but due to the cav/pcav writing, anything produced with this will be totally unreadable on very old cd hardware.

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    Sony CDU31A

    Type: CD-ROM drive with ISA controller by Sony in 1993.
    Used in early 386-s. Also can be hooked up to some sound cards.

    Results: PARTIALLY USABLE FOR RETRO - Its usually installed in retro computer by default (386-s), but you dont want to buy this for sure.

    CD READ SPEED: The drive can read original discs on 2x speed. This makes it ideal to be used in 386 if your ONLY goal is to use geniune discs, as the spinning speed is very slow, barely noticable.
    CD-R: The drive cant seem to read written disks. I googled it up a bit, and there are some websites saying, it in fact, can read written discs. This probably applies on the earlyest cd-r discs from the early 90s, however, it will not be able to read modern CD-R-s, or anything written faster than 1x. Back then i have tried discs in it written by a vintage 2x cd teac writer, and it was unable to read of the contents. It was not able to read any of the CD-s i ever had. It wasnt able to read discs friends written with random burners.
    CD-RW: Not readable.

    Longlivety: The stuff died on its own, without using it for 2-3 years, while it was sitting in the shelf. The controller card and/or the drive stopped working. After one day of cursing, i have thrown the drive away a year ago. Maybe i still have the controller card somewhere, or maybe i threw that away as well.

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    I made a photo for those who not yet experienced this phenomon:


  5. #15

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    I mean maybe not all of us are stomping on our optical discs or frisbeing them into walls

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    Quote Originally Posted by maxtherabbit View Post
    I mean maybe not all of us are stomping on our optical discs or frisbeing them into walls
    The disc on the photo is treated very gently, its seated in a 100-case disc container. There are no scratches on the surface. The small dirt you see on it, is just dust.

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    Sony CDU31A

    Type: CD-ROM drive with ISA controller by Sony in 1993.
    Used in early 386-s. Also can be hooked up to some sound cards.

    Results: PARTIALLY USABLE FOR RETRO - Its usually installed in retro computer by default (386-s), but you dont want to buy this for sure.

    CD READ SPEED: The drive can read original discs on 2x speed. This makes it ideal to be used in 386 if your ONLY goal is to use geniune discs, as the spinning speed is very slow, barely noticable.
    CD-R: The drive cant seem to read written disks. I googled it up a bit, and there are some websites saying, it in fact, can read written discs. This probably applies on the earlyest cd-r discs from the early 90s, however, it will not be able to read modern CD-R-s, or anything written faster than 1x. Back then i have tried discs in it written by a vintage 2x cd teac writer, and it was unable to read of the contents. It was not able to read any of the CD-s i ever had. It wasnt able to read discs friends written with random burners.
    CD-RW: Not readable.

    Longlivety: The stuff died on its own, without using it for 2-3 years, while it was sitting in the shelf. The controller card and/or the drive stopped working. After one day of cursing, i have thrown the drive away a year ago. Maybe i still have the controller card somewhere, or maybe i threw that away as well.
    Okay now I'm really baffled with this one. It's a CD drive from 93 and ground zero for multimedia PC's and is a perfect fit for a 386 system and you are not recommending it because it's slow and has poor CD-R support?
    Also it's a Sony. A bit of research finds that their optical drives in the 90's had several SMD lytics that leak. I personally had to deal with them on one of their slightly earlier SCSI 2x caddy loaders.
    For one, just assume that no CD drive before 2000 is going to handle a burned disc at all. I can't think of a lot of people who have not known this for years. Second the slow speed is PART of the nostalgia.
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  8. #18

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    Another thing to consider when burning new cds for vintage machines: today's blank cdrs are not meant to be written in such slow speeds

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    Quote Originally Posted by NeXT View Post
    It's a CD drive from 93 and ground zero for multimedia PC's and is a perfect fit for a 386 system and you are not recommending it because it's slow and has poor CD-R support?
    If you are building your retro 386 right now, then i dont recommend putting this drive in.
    If its already installed to your computer, then learn to live with it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by konc View Post
    Another thing to consider when burning new cds for vintage machines: today's blank cdrs are not meant to be written in such slow speeds
    Today CD-s and DVD-s are meant to be written with CAV with the newest CAV writers, but vintage stuff will not like a cd/dvd if its written with CAV (even if its basically always a CAV reader). For my old devices, slower speed always won so far. If you plan to use the cd/dvd in new hardware, then you can go with the highest speed available, and that will give the best results. If the compatibility is important, then the slow speed will win, even if the modern cd/dvd medium is not optimal for that.

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