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Thread: CD/DVD drive for retro usage

  1. #21

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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    Today CD-s and DVD-s are meant to be written with CAV with the newest CAV writers, but vintage stuff will not like a cd/dvd if its written with CAV (even if its basically always a CAV reader). For my old devices, slower speed always won so far. If you plan to use the cd/dvd in new hardware, then you can go with the highest speed available, and that will give the best results. If the compatibility is important, then the slow speed will win, even if the modern cd/dvd medium is not optimal for that.
    Agreed, although assuming that you want to write discs on a modern machine to use them on an older, you probably won't even be able to use slower speeds with modern discs/drives/software.
    Unless you go the floppies way using a tweener

  2. #22

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    I write all my CD-Rs in a Pioneer BDR-207D blu ray writer. I write them at 10x on to GENUINE taiyo-yuden media (NOT the CMC TY branded garbage.) These discs read flawlessly in all my retro CDROMs, including but not limited to 2 caddy loading SCSI drives from ~1993 and a Sega CD.

    Saying drives before 2000 will not read CD-Rs is incorrect. Many early 90s drives will flat out not read CD-RW, but that is a different matter.

  3. #23

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    My IBM 95A and Model 90 can read CD-RW as long as the CD was burned as a CD, the older OSs HATE a "live CD". OBTW, CD-R work, the same issue with "live CDs"

    Disclaimer - IBM PS/2 CD drives on microchannel systems are overwhelmingly SCSI. They must support parity. SCSI DVD drives will work, but need more performance to work while other things are running.

    A 486SX-20 probably would not be useable with a DVD, no matter what the SCSI controller is.

  4. Default

    NEC CDR 1910A

    Results: USABLE FOR RETRO



    Type: PC SCSI


    The NEC CDR 1910A, identifies as NEC 465, is a SCSI drive which requires a SCSI controller, its made in the late 90s. This is not a writer, only a reader.

    -CD-R and CD-ROM read speed is 32x MAX. The 32x speed is slow enough, so it will not explode the CD-s if they are not damaged too much. The drive is capable to do approx 2 MByte/sec read transfer.

    -The drive is compatible with CD-RW discs, if they are written 8x or below (you will probably need a vintage writer to do so). The CD-RW reading speed is 1x (about 100 kbyte/sec).

    Limitations:
    Its a mystery why they have used SCSI interface for this drive. I was lucky to have a PCI SCSI controller with a cable, and an unoccupied PCI slot, so i was just able to hook up the drive. The drive was detected without problems, and was working out of the box. However, i have experienced limitations. Booting was not possible from this drive, even if i set the booting order to SCSI in the BIOS. The drive refuses to eject the CD under Linux, uness you use the eject command manually (or click on the eject button in your file browser). Probably it would need a little bit extra configuration to make it work from DOS. If your computer dont have IDE, this drive can be a very good choice, but probably you are better off with some writer instead.

  5. #25
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    Early CD drives were almost all SCSI, then the "not-IDE" parallel interface of some of the budget ones. ATAPI (packet mode ATA) wasn't yet a reality--and in fact, ATAPI is just the SCSI protocol encapsulated in an IDE protocol.

    My first CD drive was an external NEC audio player repurposed as a digital drive. I think I still have manual for it--it was a 1x speed device.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Early CD drives were almost all SCSI, then the "not-IDE" parallel interface of some of the budget ones. ATAPI (packet mode ATA) wasn't yet a reality--and in fact, ATAPI is just the SCSI protocol encapsulated in an IDE protocol.

    My first CD drive was an external NEC audio player repurposed as a digital drive. I think I still have manual for it--it was a 1x speed device.
    yeah, this is however made in 1999, so its a bit strange

  7. #27
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    My first CD-ROM was a Mitsumi 1x. At the time I was running OS/2 on my home 386 PC, and someone on some OS/2 board posted a home made driver for the Mitsumi. Next for me was a packet writing Samsung CD-RW. I paid a lot of money for the thing and it was a dog back when CD's were about a buck a pop. It would get about 90% through the write cycle and then fail most of the time. I believe it was all software related. Adaptec had some pretty good software and I used that on a NT office machine back in the late 90's early 2K years. Then came Nero and you had to tune-in on all of the jargon like Joliet with its misfires. In the end, the Nero Burning ROM proved to pretty good.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Geri View Post
    yeah, this is however made in 1999, so its a bit strange
    Not at all--SCSI CD drives pretty much always existed alongside the ATAPI ones, particularly for non-PC (e.g. Sun) platforms. I've got a Ricoh CD-RW drive that's SCSI interface.

    After the NEC, I used a Plextor SCSI drive that used CD caddies.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    My first CD drive was an external NEC audio player repurposed as a digital drive. I think I still have manual for it--it was a 1x speed device.
    Was it a little beige clamshell thing? I might still have the same one, also my first. Came with a MediaVision ProAudio Spectrum-based "Multimedia Kit" sometime in the early 1990s, which was also my first soundcard. I held onto the drive to use with a Trantor parallel-SCSI cable on a tiny 486 laptop.
    My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs

  10. #30
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    Pretty much - top-loader. Mine came with a wall wart and a Trantor T130B SCSI card. Still have the manual.

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