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Thread: FOXBORO Integrated Circuits Users Guide (TTL vendor cross-reference) 1973

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    Default FOXBORO Integrated Circuits Users Guide (TTL vendor cross-reference) 1973

    I've just uploaded the FOXBORO User's Guide from 1973 which has some details on how their part numbers correspond to other 74xx chip vendors to:

    https://archive.org/details/foxboro-...ts-users-guide


    PREFACE

    FOXBORO Integrated Circuits Users Guide


    Ths book (document 73002BZ) is intended as an aid to maintenance personnel servicing process management and control equipment such as FOX 2 Systems.
    It contains information necessary to trace signals through or replace integrated circuits (ICs). ICs described herein are used in standard system components manufactured by the Foxboro Company. ICs in standard system components, such as computers, drums, CRT consoles, etc. that are part of the Foxboro product line, but not manufactured by The Foxboro Company, are not included.

    Foxboro part numbers and equivalent IC manufacturer's part numbers are identified in Table 1. This table can be used as a parts substitution list in the replacement of integrated circuits.

    All integrated circuits described in this standard book might not be in any given system, and any ICs for custom modules designed specifically for your system are not covered in this standard book.

    IC information is presented in Foxboro part number sequence, as indicated in the table of contents. Pages are not numbered, so information on an IC is located relative to the alpha-numeric part number sequence.

    This guide cross-references 74-series TTL logic chips between the following vendors:
    FOXBORO - Texas Instruments - National Semiconductor - Sprague - Motorola - Fairchild - Digital Equipment Corporation - Signetics

    NOTE
    This book was supplied with the FOXBORO FOX 2 System, a rebadged DEC PDP-11/15 minicomputer.

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    Foxboro is one of the old-line instrumentation (pre-war) and process control companies, now a division of Schneider Electric, it's very big in the oil and gas business. I remember the gas flowmeters from my (short) life as an instrumentation tech. Curiously, there is a direct-line relationship to the Bristol company of chart recorder fame. (Bristol brothers inherited the firm from their father, then went on to found Foxboro).

    It's a shame that more interest isn't shown in industrial instrumentation and process control equipment. It was one of the earliest places where computers moved out of the "glass cage" and onto the plant floor.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Foxboro is one of the old-line instrumentation (pre-war) and process control companies, now a division of Schneider Electric, it's very big in the oil and gas business. I remember the gas flowmeters from my (short) life as an instrumentation tech. Curiously, there is a direct-line relationship to the Bristol company of chart recorder fame. (Bristol brothers inherited the firm from their father, then went on to found Foxboro).

    It's a shame that more interest isn't shown in industrial instrumentation and process control equipment. It was one of the earliest places where computers moved out of the "glass cage" and onto the plant floor.
    We have a lot of Foxboro pneumatic valve positioners on site and I agree, some of the C&I stuff of the past is lost and should have been saved (mind you, just had a look and quite a few of the later units are still available !)

    The CEGB used a lot of Kent and Fisher pneumatic control equipment. Lovely three term controllers using nothing but air with a flapper, nozzle and a few bellows units. We even had a fully pneumatic chart recorder with bellows controlled pens and a air driven paper drive motor.

    Why we were called instrument mechanics at the time.

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    They called us "pyrometer technicians".

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    They called us "pyrometer technicians".
    Nice, never heard that one.

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    Well, it was a steel mill, so temperature control was a big thing. I remember checking T/C temperatures using an L&N optical pyrometer as well as calibrating controllers using a potentiometer.



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