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Thread: Can Windows 7 do what no other os do?

  1. #1
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    Default Can Windows 7 do what no other os do?

    I was messing around with a computer I found on the road. I have an Adata 128gb ssd, plugged it in, installed win10 pro. All well and good. Pulled the ssd and put in la 500gb laptop drive. Installed ubuntu 16.04 lts. Still good. Ok plugged the ssd into the 2nd sata channel (or vice versa, can't remember) and subsequently nothing would boot. Tried swapping drives. Nothing. Then I tried reinstalling win10 and ubuntu on both drives. Still nothing. Man this stinks. So in desperation I pulled out a dell win7 restore disk I bought at a show many years ago. It installed on both drives fine! Not only that, it didn't ask for a key (and this is an asus not a dell), as the asus has a win7 home premium coa. What could be better?

    So if you're privvy to the mystical powers bestowed upon win7, please let me in on it. Upon thinking I'm wondering if this had something to do with neither 10 nor ubuntu being native to this machine, and the uefi became confused until "cured" by a disk containing it's native os? Still doesn't make sense in my mind though. And yes I suppose there's the possibility that one sata cable wasn't plugged properly. Still doesn't explain why nothing installed except 7 though.
    Last edited by tipc; April 29th, 2020 at 09:16 AM.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    I was messing around with a computer I found on the road. I have an Adata 128gb ssd, plugged it in, installed win10 pro. All well and good. Pulled the ssd and put in la 500gb laptop drive. Installed ubuntu 16.04 lts. Still good. Ok plugged the ssd into the 2nd sata channel (or vice versa, can't remember) and subsequently nothing would boot. Tried swapping drives. Nothing. Then I tried reinstalling win10 and ubuntu on both drives. Still nothing. Man this stinks. So in desperation I pulled out a dell win7 restore disk I bought at a show many years ago. It installed on both drives fine! Not only that, it didn't ask for a key (and this is an asus not a dell), as the asus has a win7 home premium coa. What could be better?

    So if you're privvy to the mystical powers bestowed upon win7, please let me in on it. Upon thinking I'm wondering if this had something to do with neither 10 nor ubuntu being native to this machine, and the uefi became confused until "cured" by a disk containing it's native os? Still doesn't make sense in my mind though. And yes I suppose there's the possibility that one sata cable wasn't plugged properly. Still doesn't explain why nothing installed except 7 though.
    Don't know if this helps, but I recently had a version of Linux installed in a partition behind W10 on my big gamer with a UEFI BIOS. If I pulled up 'Disk Manager' in 'Administrative Tools', I could see the Linux partition, but couldn't remove it. Back up a little, this was after I ran the Linux uninstall app and removed the GRUB boot menu from startup. That didn't make sense that W10's own app couldn't whack that Linux partition, but the fix was to open a CMD prompt and run DISKPART and then I was able to remove the Linux partition. My take is to never install Linux on the same HD as the main operating system. Also, be aware of UEFI's GPT partitioning scheme and make sure you're using 'Legacy'.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  3. #3
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    Default

    What probably happened is that your disk swapping altered the hard drive boot order and UEFI was looking to an invalid location to boot from. On more open UEFI implementations, in addition to the boot order, you also have a hard drive order on top of that if multiple hard drives are present. UEFI could have seen that storage devices changed and altered the boot order in a way the system would never boot. Additionally, if you started installing Windows 10 and Ubuntu again with both drives present in the system, both OSes are going to fight each other to have the primary UEFI boot loader and cause them to be potentially corrupted.

    Additionally with UEFI, you'll need to make sure Secure Boot is disabled when installing Linux, because it's primarily designed for Microsoft operating systems and creates a lot of headaches for 3rd party OSes. Secure Boot isn't required for Windows either, but Microsoft strong armed it into the UEFI spec because they're scum. There are quite a few devices out there where Secure Boot cannot be disabled either intentionally or because UEFI bugs, and you're stuck with Windows.

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