Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Uh... hi?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Posts
    6

    Post Uh... hi?

    Hello there. A Hungarian living in Montréal, Canada chiming in.

    I'm a collector of old (read: awesome) home computers since the late 1990's. My first one was a Commodore 64. Today I own... a lot of them. I'm a software engineer by trade, but I also did 3D modeling, video production, etc.

    I'm an old (really?!) veteran of the European demoscene, hence my username: Tomcat of Madwizards, which is a predominantly Polish Amiga demogroup. Some years ago I've authored a monography about the history of the demoscene titled Freax. Alas it's out of print, but I'm planning to release a revised version. A second volume is still being written. Ask me anything about demos and the underground scene in general.

    You can find me on Instagram as molsonhortons and look at a small part of my collection. Most of my stuff is still in Budapest waiting to be shipped over.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
    Location
    New Jersey, USA
    Posts
    574

    Default

    Hi, welcome!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    4,728
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Welcome to the forum and please bring a lot of those Hungarian pastries with you (or at least some recipes) .
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,827

    Default

    And ghoulash... That meaty meaty cholesterol laiden ghoulash... Delicious!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Posts
    6

    Default

    Tough luck with the goulash, I'm vegetarian. But if you really want pastries, here's a Christmas pastry roll recipe.

    Beigli is a nice Christmas cake, a roll filled with walnuts or poppy seed, less commonly chestnut. The good thing about it is if you do it right, it lasts for weeks, and it can be left out under the Christmas tree or on the kitchen table for anyone to take a slice when they wish. Sometimes it's also made at Easter. I heard that it's originally from Poland, but the name "beigli" sounds very Germanic, so it may have arrived to us from Austria. Here's how to make a walnut and a poppy roll.

    Ingredients for the pastry:
    - 50 dkg general purpose flour
    - 25 dkg butter
    - 2 eggs or 2-3 tablespoons of plain yoghurt (the original calls for eggs, of course, but there's really no difference)
    - 5 dkg sugar
    - 2 dl milk
    - 1 tablespoon of dry yeast (or 3 dkg of traditional yeast)
    - A pinch of salt

    Warm up the milk to about body temperature, add the sugar, dissolve it completely, then mix in the yeast. I use a beater to break up the clots.
    Melt the butter. I just put it into the microwave in a mug with a plate on top so it won't splatter.
    If you're using eggs, separate them, beat up the yolk and add it to the flour. Yoghurt doesn't need to be beaten. Keep the yellows and beat them up too.
    Add the milk mixture and the liquid butter too. You can easily mix them into a soft dough with a spoon. Work on it for a few minutes until it doesn't stick to the bowl. Then put it away for two hours.
    Now comes the filling.

    Ingredients for poppy seed filling:
    - 15 dkg poppy seeds, ground
    - 10 dkg sugar
    - 1.5 dl milk
    - A little vanilla sugar

    Heat up the milk, be careful not to burn it though. Mix everything into it, stir it well, then let it cool. It should become a toothpaste-like substance. If it's already cold and it's still too thin, stir some flour into it. Some families also mix raisins into it.

    Ingredients for walnut filling:
    - 15 dkg walnuts, ground
    - 10 dkg icing sugar
    - 1 dl water
    - A lemon

    Shred some lemon peel with a cheese grater. A pinch will do, you won't need the entire lemon. Boil the water, throw in the lemon peel, then mix in the sugar to make syrup. Then just add the walnut and stir well. Raisins go well with this one too. Let it cool, and again you can thicken it with flour if necessary.

    Here comes the tricky part: turning all this stuff into an actual beigli. It's not easy! The filling just loves to flow out, it bloats up and breaks in the oven, and generally it's a quite unruly cake. Patience and the right methods can yield great results though.

    First of all, preheat the oven to around 200 Celsius or 395 Fahrenheit.

    Cover the kitchen counter with shrink foil and put a sheet of baking paper on it. Sprinkle some flour on it. Now take half of the dough, put it on the counter, and sprinkle flour on it too, so it won't be sticky. Don't knead it. Form a lump, then push it with your palm into a roughly rectangular shape. Use a rolling pin to form it into an actual rectangle, as long as your baking pan, and about half as much wide. Fold back the edges to make them straight.

    The result should be an roughly 5 mm thick layer of dough. Don't make it thin, this is not strudel. It'll break in the oven if it's too thin. On the other hand if it's too thick, it won't bake through,

    Now spread some of the filling uniformly. Keep about 1-2 cm of margin from three edges and about 5 centimeters from one of the long edges. You may not need all the filling. I usually end up using only half of it. Actually you can even double the amount of dough and make four beiglis instead of two, your call.

    Lift the baking paper at the long side of the rectangle where you kept a narrower margin while spreading. Fold over some of the beigli onto itself. Repeat turning it onto itself little by little. In a few steps you can roll up the entire beigli nicely. When all the filled part is rolled up, fold up the empty edge from the other side and push it gently to stick onto the top. Now you have a roll. Fold up the ends so the filling won't spill out. Now you can roll it a little bit to and back so it sticks to itself. Then just raise it with the paper and put it onto a baking pan.

    Repeat the process with the other filling. It's recommended to do the walnut one first because the poppy seed filling is a bit more runny. The baking paper will keep them nicely apart from each other while cooking. Place them next to each other to prevent bloating. The seam where the roll was closed should be downwards so it won't open up.

    Paint the top of the beiglis with the egg yellows. If you didn't use eggs, mix a little milk with a pinch of turmeric. It will give your beiglis a nice yellowish color.

    Don't let them sit around for long, put them into the oven immediately. It takes 30-35 minutes. Half-time pinch a few holes onto the top with a baking needle to vent out the steam and prevent the beiglis from cracking. The poppy seed one is usually more prone to that.

    When done, take them out, put them away, let them cool and mature overnight. Don't cut them immediately as they're too brittle and will break to crumbs. Fresh beigli is lovely for breakfast on Christmas morning, with a little milk or coffee.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    1,952

    Default

    My mother was Croatian so I'm not sure if it was Hungarian or not. But she used to make this soupy beef stew ghoulashy stuff that got poured over egg noodles. Man it was rock em sock em.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    2,827

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    My mother was Croatian so I'm not sure if it was Hungarian or not. But she used to make this soupy beef stew ghoulashy stuff that got poured over egg noodles. Man it was rock em sock em.
    Sounds like ghoulash to me and sounds delicious. My wife is Czech.. They have ghoulash as well. Its not just hungarian; alhough the hungarian type may be the most popular. Simmering for a full day is key by the way.. Sometimes longer.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    4,728
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcatmwi View Post
    Tough luck with the goulash, I'm vegetarian. But if you really want pastries, here's a Christmas pastry roll recipe.

    Beigli is a nice Christmas cake, a roll filled with walnuts or poppy seed, less commonly chestnut. The good thing about it is if you do it right, it lasts for weeks, and it can be left out under the Christmas tree or on the kitchen table for anyone to take a slice when they wish. Sometimes it's also made at Easter. I heard that it's originally from Poland, but the name "beigli" sounds very Germanic, so it may have arrived to us from Austria. Here's how to make a walnut and a poppy roll.

    Ingredients for the pastry:
    - 50 dkg general purpose flour
    - 25 dkg butter
    - 2 eggs or 2-3 tablespoons of plain yoghurt (the original calls for eggs, of course, but there's really no difference)
    - 5 dkg sugar
    - 2 dl milk
    - 1 tablespoon of dry yeast (or 3 dkg of traditional yeast)
    - A pinch of salt

    Warm up the milk to about body temperature, add the sugar, dissolve it completely, then mix in the yeast. I use a beater to break up the clots.
    Melt the butter. I just put it into the microwave in a mug with a plate on top so it won't splatter.
    If you're using eggs, separate them, beat up the yolk and add it to the flour. Yoghurt doesn't need to be beaten. Keep the yellows and beat them up too.
    Add the milk mixture and the liquid butter too. You can easily mix them into a soft dough with a spoon. Work on it for a few minutes until it doesn't stick to the bowl. Then put it away for two hours.
    Now comes the filling.

    Ingredients for poppy seed filling:
    - 15 dkg poppy seeds, ground
    - 10 dkg sugar
    - 1.5 dl milk
    - A little vanilla sugar

    Heat up the milk, be careful not to burn it though. Mix everything into it, stir it well, then let it cool. It should become a toothpaste-like substance. If it's already cold and it's still too thin, stir some flour into it. Some families also mix raisins into it.

    Ingredients for walnut filling:
    - 15 dkg walnuts, ground
    - 10 dkg icing sugar
    - 1 dl water
    - A lemon

    Shred some lemon peel with a cheese grater. A pinch will do, you won't need the entire lemon. Boil the water, throw in the lemon peel, then mix in the sugar to make syrup. Then just add the walnut and stir well. Raisins go well with this one too. Let it cool, and again you can thicken it with flour if necessary.

    Here comes the tricky part: turning all this stuff into an actual beigli. It's not easy! The filling just loves to flow out, it bloats up and breaks in the oven, and generally it's a quite unruly cake. Patience and the right methods can yield great results though.

    First of all, preheat the oven to around 200 Celsius or 395 Fahrenheit.

    Cover the kitchen counter with shrink foil and put a sheet of baking paper on it. Sprinkle some flour on it. Now take half of the dough, put it on the counter, and sprinkle flour on it too, so it won't be sticky. Don't knead it. Form a lump, then push it with your palm into a roughly rectangular shape. Use a rolling pin to form it into an actual rectangle, as long as your baking pan, and about half as much wide. Fold back the edges to make them straight.

    The result should be an roughly 5 mm thick layer of dough. Don't make it thin, this is not strudel. It'll break in the oven if it's too thin. On the other hand if it's too thick, it won't bake through,

    Now spread some of the filling uniformly. Keep about 1-2 cm of margin from three edges and about 5 centimeters from one of the long edges. You may not need all the filling. I usually end up using only half of it. Actually you can even double the amount of dough and make four beiglis instead of two, your call.

    Lift the baking paper at the long side of the rectangle where you kept a narrower margin while spreading. Fold over some of the beigli onto itself. Repeat turning it onto itself little by little. In a few steps you can roll up the entire beigli nicely. When all the filled part is rolled up, fold up the empty edge from the other side and push it gently to stick onto the top. Now you have a roll. Fold up the ends so the filling won't spill out. Now you can roll it a little bit to and back so it sticks to itself. Then just raise it with the paper and put it onto a baking pan.

    Repeat the process with the other filling. It's recommended to do the walnut one first because the poppy seed filling is a bit more runny. The baking paper will keep them nicely apart from each other while cooking. Place them next to each other to prevent bloating. The seam where the roll was closed should be downwards so it won't open up.

    Paint the top of the beiglis with the egg yellows. If you didn't use eggs, mix a little milk with a pinch of turmeric. It will give your beiglis a nice yellowish color.

    Don't let them sit around for long, put them into the oven immediately. It takes 30-35 minutes. Half-time pinch a few holes onto the top with a baking needle to vent out the steam and prevent the beiglis from cracking. The poppy seed one is usually more prone to that.

    When done, take them out, put them away, let them cool and mature overnight. Don't cut them immediately as they're too brittle and will break to crumbs. Fresh beigli is lovely for breakfast on Christmas morning, with a little milk or coffee.
    Back in the 50's my girl friend's parents had immigrated from Hungry, and her mother got us all hooked on the pastries. (she wound up marrying my best friend).
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    1,952

    Default

    I was a veg for 5 or 6 years. No didn't eat much ghoulash, but there's no reason you couldn't opt for a vegetarian alternative. I find with italian pasta sauce it's the oil and herbs that have the most profound effect. Ghoulash is a meat-centric dish, I get that. But more then that it's a pasta dish. So viable meatless alternatives have to be good also.

    A lot of people go crazy with meats. Sausage AND ground beef in the lasagna. Seafood lasagna. Please. Maybe people have more complex pallets thrn I do. I'll always opt for simpler concoctions. If there's ravioli, and if it's prepared right, the meat is totally unnecessary imo. The pasta and especially the cheese are what's most important. Again imo. I used to frequent this pizza place years ago that had the most insane vegetarian slices. There was nothing that could be added to that.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    1,952

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tomcatmwi View Post
    When done, take them out, put them away, let them cool and mature overnight. Don't cut them immediately as they're too brittle and will break to crumbs. Fresh beigli is lovely for breakfast on Christmas morning, with a little milk or coffee.
    Not in the refrigerator?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •