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Thread: Se440bx2

  1. #1

    Default Se440bx2

    I have two SE440BX-2 motherboard. One is new, never opened it. The other one was new in box and I did open it, and built a PIII 750 out of it with 768 MB RAM. It runs fine with the PIII. However as an experiment, I ordered a slocket from eBay and put a brand new Celeron 500 on it. The board will not even power up with the slocket. It also does not power up without a CPU in place.

    I realize it says pentium 1st gen for this forum, but there is no section for Pentium II and III, and I think there should be. P II and III hardware is already over 20 years old and at 35 years of age, this is the hardware I played with in high school. I remember even the school accidentally threw away a machine mistakenly marked as a Pentium - 90. It was a Pentium III 900! It had an ASUS CUBX-E motherboard and 512 MB RAM! I snatched that out of the trash and used that (in a better case with bigger hard drives) well into college.

    I of course appreciate and love the much older systems, heck the IBM5150 is approaching 40 years old. But its getting extremely difficult and expensive to find 5150s and XTs and even AT 5170 computers in good working and good cosmetic condition.

    Anyways, I just wanted to acknowledge that this might not be the BEST category for the post but it did seem to be the closest. Does anybody out there know why the SE440BX2 will not power on with a Slocket? Do I need to get a different Slocket? My goal was to bench the PIII 750 against the Celeron 500 and note the differences in performance for a YouTube video i plan on doing shortly.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by geekboy1984 View Post
    I realize it says pentium 1st gen for this forum, but there is no section for Pentium II and III, and I think there should be. P II and III hardware is already over 20 years old and at 35 years of age, this is the hardware I played with in high school.
    "Vintage" in our case are computers from the 50's to the early 90's. While Pentium 2 and 3 systems are getting advanced in age, they're not quite vintage yet. We have an off topic section at the bottom of the forum for discussing such computers.


    Quote Originally Posted by geekboy1984 View Post
    Does anybody out there know why the SE440BX2 will not power on with a Slocket? Do I need to get a different Slocket? My goal was to bench the PIII 750 against the Celeron 500 and note the differences in performance for a YouTube video i plan on doing shortly.
    Slotkets were notorious for having compatibility issues, especially the earlier ones. A whole bunch of things have to go right for a slotket to work, starting with BIOS microcode support for the CPU. If there's no support for the CPU, the board either won't boot or say an unknown CPU is installed. Many vendors also had their own vendor specific version of the slotket that only worked in their boards.

    In your case, both CPUs you have are not supported by the motherboard.

    https://web.archive.org/web/20180108...oard-SE440BX-2

    According to Intel, the original board configuration supports up to a Pentium II 450 and a Celeron 333. With a BIOS update, it will take up to a Pentium III 550. With a hacked BIOS, it may take faster, but it's not a supported configuration.

  3. #3

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    thanks for bringing that to my attention about the CPU support. What would you say would be a good board for proper coppermine support? I ask because it seems the i815 and i810 chipsets only support up to 512 MB RAM where the 440BX can take up to 1GB.

  4. #4
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    Here is a list of 440BX motherboards, some which allow a FSB up to 200 MHz via overclocking:

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/556

    Optionally, you can go with 3rd party chipsets. VIA made several Pentium 2/3 chipsets that were decent.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_o...370_and_Slot_1

    The i810 and i815 were junk that nobody wanted, hence why the 440BX stayed around far longer than it otherwise would have.

  5. Default

    The CPU support specified there must be out of date. Either that or there are different versions of the board. I have an SE440BX-2 and it has had a Pentium III 600e in it from day one.

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    Usually you can use slot 1 CPUs up to about 1GHz on 440BX boards. It's a good chipset with very decent ISA support; something that cannot be said of later chipsets. Slockets can extend the range. I use a 1.4GHz Socket 370 Celeron on one board using a Powerleap Slocket and a 1.3GHz Celeron on another using a slightly modified Chinese (can't recall the name) slocket. Both are recognized by the BIOS as 500MHz PPros, but CPU speed diagnostics gets the speed correct.

  7. #7

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    Even though the slocket I ordered off ebay was new in box, it must have just been incompatible. I will have to pony up for a power leap one then, as I have seen in old reviews online that powerleap seems to be the way to go. Thanks for letting me know about Via chipsets. back in the day, when this stuff was the current technology, I had a friend who always said stay away from via, via makes crap, via chipsets are slow and even though we were just kids then, that notion always stuck with me, mostly because it made a bit of sense. Via made the C3 which was complete garbage, so it stood to reason that everything made with a via chipset would be junk. However recent research of mine finds that the Abit VP6 used a via chipset and that motherboard was the holy grail of many a computer nerd back in the day. I remember wanting one because I could stick my two hard drives on the extra IDE controller and leave the chipset controlled IDE for my zip drive, ls-120 drive, DVD burner and CD Changer. because you know, it was really important to have a ton of removable media types in your PC back then. if you didnt use all your 5.25 drive bays, you were a simpleton, lol. I say that in jest of course.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Usually you can use slot 1 CPUs up to about 1GHz on 440BX boards. It's a good chipset with very decent ISA support; something that cannot be said of later chipsets. Slockets can extend the range. I use a 1.4GHz Socket 370 Celeron on one board using a Powerleap Slocket and a 1.3GHz Celeron on another using a slightly modified Chinese (can't recall the name) slocket. Both are recognized by the BIOS as 500MHz PPros, but CPU speed diagnostics gets the speed correct.
    The 440BX was indeed a very good chipset that could be abused to do all sorts of things it was never intended to do, but only on 3rd party boards.

    Intel motherboards are notorious for being super strict on configurations and almost never allow overclocking. Getting unsupported CPU upgrades of any kind to work on them was dubious at best.

    Quote Originally Posted by geekboy1984 View Post
    Via made the C3 which was complete garbage, so it stood to reason that everything made with a via chipset would be junk.
    VIA actually didn't make the C3, it was a design from Centaur Hauls. In the late 90s, VIA was looking to get into the x86 arena, so they bought both Cyrix and Centaur Hauls (who was responsible for the IDT Winchip.) Cyrix wasn't in a state to be releasing a new product because they had been decimated by the National Semiconductor (NSC) merger, and their designs were too complex and expensive to produce regardless. What VIA did is use Cyrix's name recognition and branded a Centaur Hauls core with it, which created the VIA C3. Centaur Hauls had specialized in making smaller, low power x86 cores for years and it made sense at the time for VIA to use them.

    The VIA C3 was widely panned at the time in first world countries because the market segment VIA was targeting at the time didn't exist. They wanted a low power and cheap core that could be marketed to emerging and low income markets like Southeast Asia, India and Africa.

    Cyrix's technology did live on in a convoluted way. In 1997, Cyrix released their MediaGX SoC, which was a Cx5x86 core (a cut down version of their 6x86MX) integrated with sound, video and a chipset on a chip. It was later refined under NSC, then sold on to AMD who released two variants, the GX and LX. The fastest known variant is a Geode LX at 600 MHz, and the Geode line was kept alive until at least last year.

    There was another line, the NX, but it was basically an Athlon XP-M called a Geode.

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