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Thread: Cholesterol

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    A good friend passed away a few years ago. He was a Korean war vet, probably about 150+ pounds overweight, got no exercise and what he ate would give me cardiac failure. For breakfast, 4 eggs, ham, bacon, sausage, fried potatoes....you get the idea. He died of leukemia at age 88.

    When I say "no exercise" I really mean it--he'd drive across a parking lot just to avoid having to walk from where he'd parked his car.

    Around the same time, a neighbor died of heart attack. He looked like the picture of health, was very active; there wasn't a spare ounce on him--it was all muscle. He was 42 and left a wife and a young son.

    The point being that a certain amount of our longevity--or lack of it--is written at birth in our genetic makeup. I take pride that I'm older than my father or grandfather or his father. I do my best, but I'm also aware that there will come a time when no diet or course of living will save me from the reaper. (Cue Firesign Theatre).
    Genetics makes a huge difference, but what we eat and how we exercise can give or take a few years or more. Drink too much and smoke too much and you decrease your lifespan quite a bit. Working in a facility with carcinogens will give you cancer. And if you are a very old man you are slowly dying of prostrate cancer even if something else kills you first.

    What most people gloss over is stress. The amount of stress you are under affects pretty much everything. I seen people age ten years in the space of a couple just over stress and it is not good for the heart.
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  2. #32
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    Anyone can quote some study, one that we're all required to accept as the last word. The point is the amount of vegetarianism in India is huge. Americans consume way too much meat and as a result suffer from obesity, heart disease, and high cholesterol. I suppose there's a point you're trying to make, not positive what it could be.

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Anyone can quote some study, one that we're all required to accept as the last word. The point is the amount of vegetarianism in India is huge. Americans consume way too much meat and as a result suffer from obesity, heart disease, and high cholesterol. I suppose there's a point you're trying to make, not positive what it could be.
    Sorry you made it sound like they are all vegetarians in India while a report done in India suggests they eat meat too but won't admit it for societal reasons. Hindus worship cows and killing them in India is a very bad thing let alone eating beef.

    Our problem is processed foods and sugar consumption not meat in general. People here have been meat eaters for a long time and obesity wasn't a problem until recently, same thing is going on in Europe at a slower pace then the US. People in Asia are getting fat too.
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  4. #34
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    Processed foods and sugar is a problem obviously. But vegetable matter is consumed far far less then say 100 years ago. When an overweight person in the us sits down for a meal, you can be sure the bulk of what they're consuming is meat, followed by starch. Exchange the majority of that with vegetable matter and watch the incidence of heart disease, obesity, etc. plummet. People don't like hearing it because they don't want to change their eating habits.

  5. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Genetics makes a huge difference, but what we eat and how we exercise can give or take a few years or more. Drink too much and smoke too much and you decrease your lifespan quite a bit. Working in a facility with carcinogens will give you cancer. And if you are a very old man you are slowly dying of prostrate cancer even if something else kills you first.

    What most people gloss over is stress. The amount of stress you are under affects pretty much everything. I seen people age ten years in the space of a couple just over stress and it is not good for the heart.
    At my age, the "few years more" matters less than the quality of those few years. My own mother lived to 90, but I wouldn't want to live her last 5 years for anything. Barely aware of her surroundings and pretty much bedridden. My father spent the last months of his live in a morphine haze, his body ravaged by cancer. And I'm well aware of prostate cancer; treatments are drastic and life-destroying. I'm placing a bet that mine (verified) won't kill me before something else does. As one of my old teachers used to say "Don't get old; you won't like it."

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    . . . And I'm well aware of prostate cancer; treatments are drastic and life-destroying.
    I was very lucky having the earliest stages of prostate cancer detected by my family doctor. She noticed a 1 point plus increase in my PSA and sent me to a specialist where they took 16 bio samples and determined that I had "lesions" on the prostate. I went through an extensive month long radiation session and a procedure whereby 62 radioactive seeds were implanted into the prostate by means of a robotic device (2006). My PSA today is about 0.007. It was explained to me that prostate cancer follows generation to generation. Colon cancer and prostate cancer are two of the easiest diseases to correct if detected in time. On the subject of PSA, I've heard from many sources that a PSA test is not recommended or effective. I think that's a bunch of bull as all of my close male friends that have had prostate issues also had higher than normal PSA numbers. So, what do you do? You do what feels right for yourself. As far as these veggie fad-like diets go, I put them in the category as the anti-vaccine crowd.
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  7. #37
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    I've been through the specialists and nobody around here practices brachytherapy any more. Apparently, there was a group who made a hash of it locally and nobody wants to touch it. So the only options are radical prostectomy or 6 months of hormone therapy followed by EBRT. If you go the EBRT way, surgery is off the table because of the adhesions that result. RP has its own risk factors--I'm acquainted with a couple of tellows whose lives were pretty much destroyed by it. Given that my last biopsy score was only 2 sevens out of 12 samples, I'm hopeful that better therapies will emerge.

    FWIW, after age 70, the generally accepted assumption that a male has some level of prostate cancer is a percentage that directly corresponds to age; i.e. age 70 = 70% likelihood.

  8. #38
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    At that time, 2006, there were only 4 options available to me; i.e., 1) do nothing and let nature take its course, 2) surgical removal, 3) cryotherapy, and 4) radiation. Because the disease was in its very early stages, it was the consensus of opinions that I should go the radiation route. I didn't not want the surgery for psychological reasons, but would have went that way had they insisted, and the cryo treatment was too new to risk it. Knowing what I know now, cryo may have been the best way. Urination is not a major problem but the radiation does wreak havoc on some of the internal plumbing. Things are slower but it all works and fortunately no leaks. I have no idea what the 'state of the art' is with the prostate treatment these days and most of my crowd just went for removal.
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