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Thread: Too much documentation or not well organized.

  1. #1
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    Default Too much documentation or not well organized.

    I'm moving some of my work from the ARM Cortex 3(4) to the ARM Cortex M7 MCUs. I've got an evaluation board with a STM32F767 that looks identical (right down to component placement and values) with an STM32F429 board. Since the 767 is now somewhat cheaper than the 429, I figured, "why not? less cash for more CPU." I've got the 429 pretty much handled, so what could be different?

    Then I got the family (stm32f767 and stm32f777) reference manual. A few pages under 2000--1954.

    It looks like another long series of reading...

  2. #2

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    Myself I just started using those STM32F411 based 40 pin modules instead of the STM32F103 I used to use for everything. Almost same price but much more of RAM and Flash. A bit higher clock frequency. Floating point might be useful as well..

  3. #3

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    Yeah, I'm staring down the barrel of the STM32H743II manuals as I contemplate trying to get Mecrisp-Stellaris rolling on the Color Maximite 2 I picked up recently. Ye gods but I miss the days of being able to document an entire computer down to the register level in a couple hundred pages.
    Computers: Amiga 1200, DEC VAXStation 4000/60, DEC MicroPDP-11/73
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    "'Legacy code' often differs from its suggested alternative by actually working and scaling." - Bjarne Stroustrup

  4. #4
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    I've been using the F407 evaluation boards for years. Cheap (at about USD$9) with all the bells and whistles that one could reasonably want for most things:



    But I'm faced with an application that needs more I/O and could benefit from the added memory. Speed is less important. So I've started with this STM32F767 one:



    The added 8MB memory will come in handy. These 767 boards can be had for about USD$20--and are cheaper than the STM32F429 board that looks the same. Some new stuff to learn, however.

    I still use the STM32F103 $3 "Blue pill" boards for trivial stuff, like interfacing surplus IBM IR keyboard to PS/2. Last sale a couple of weeks ago had the keyboards at USD$2.49 NIB. Apparently, I'm one of the few who have actually figured them out.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Apparently, I'm one of the few who have actually figured them out.
    Apparently, my hat! As I once observed: You know stuff that few of the rest of us know.

    -CH-

  6. #6
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    But can it run Crysis? Or boot dos?

  7. #7
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    Oh, I'm sure that an x86 emulator, if it hasn't been written already, could boot DOS. I know that there's a version of Linux that runs on the 32F407. Few who program one realize that the thing even has an MMU. The 767 board has half a meg of program flash 8MB+ of RAM, 16MB of SPI flash, display controller and lots of other goodies. Not an RPi by any means, but then, the RPi doesn't have a hundred 5V tolerant GPIO pins.

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