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Thread: Tandon floppy drive lubrication

  1. #1

    Default Tandon floppy drive lubrication

    I have a Tandon floppy drive that I got working again after replacing some caps and an inductor on the PCB, but it is making some ticking noises that I would like to get rid off....

    • When moving the head assembly back and forth (with everything powered off), it seems to have more resistance than another tandon floppy drive I have.
    • When the drive is initialising, and it is moving the heads, I have the impression that there is some "jitter" and it is not moving as smoothly as it should. It is also making a ticking noise when it reaches the edges.
    • When opening / closing the front latch, it is also making a squeaky noise (sounds like plastic on plastic to me).


    I would like to clean / lubricate the following items :

    • The guide rails for the head assembly
    • The stepper motor ( not sure if this is needed).
    • The spindle motor (drive seems to spinning fine, have the impression the issue is more on the head assembly).
    • The handle to open / close the drive


    I've also cleaned the heads with isopropyl alcohol, and I'm wondering if the following products are suitable for lubricating the guiding rails for the head assembly and the stepper / spindle motors :

    • Kroon Oil - Handy oil - Universal Lubricant - mineral acid free household oil
    • Valvoline - White grease - Lubrication


    I've read that applying too much of these lubricants (especially the oil) can end up in places you don't want it to go, so I definitely don't want to over-do it.
    Are the products above applicable for this kind of repair, or would you recommend other products ?

    Thx.
    Retro enthousiast. Love everything < 486. Learning and sharing on my little channel

  2. #2
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    I just clean the rails, and give them a bit of a hand polish (no chemicals and often this works on it's own), then a tiny amount of white lithium grease, move heads back and forward, clean up the excess.
    For disk heads I just use a cleaning-disk and isopropyl.

    Never really needed to do anything else.

  3. #3
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    Yup, the carriage slides are usually delrin or nylon and slide on polished rails. Clean rails should be all that is required. Adding a traditional grease to the setup will only create a magnet for dust and dirt. A pure silicone lube might handle the stubborn cases, such as the PDMS stuff used as a gun lubricant, but that's about it.

  4. #4
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    Or scrape the squalene from the side of your nose where it joins the face (really !) and wipe it down the guide rails.

    It works, trust me.

    No really !!
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  5. #5
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    The lube in the stepper motor dries up and can also cause the symptoms you describe. I apply a small amount of light oil, or WD40 to the point where the shaft protrudes from the stepper. I tip the drive up on one side, apply the lube and allow it to soak in for a bit, then repeat on the other side. All the measures described previously here are very valid, but I have rehabbed three Tandon TM100-2's that were still having seek problems by also lubing the stepper motor.

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Yup, the carriage slides are usually delrin or nylon and slide on polished rails. Clean rails should be all that is required. Adding a traditional grease to the setup will only create a magnet for dust and dirt. A pure silicone lube might handle the stubborn cases, such as the PDMS stuff used as a gun lubricant, but that's about it.
    ok ... it also had issues formatting disks it seems ... didn't notice it at first as it was able to boot from most of my disks.... But during formatting it recognised the disks as 720kb as opposed to 360kb. I had to reposition the microswitch for the zero track somewhat higher (it appeared to have "dropped" a little) and fastened the screws holding the microswitch.
    After that I was able to format the disks again as 360kb.
    Retro enthousiast. Love everything < 486. Learning and sharing on my little channel

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