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Thread: looking for a small a/c motor

  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Brass or steel ways?
    It has brass ways. I did buy it when most of the accessories were cheaper. There is no digital readouts. You just have to know that moving the tool in by 1 mil is really 2 mils of cut. I've often wanted an angled tool mount for doing threads. These are all things I could make but just never took the time. I do have the poor man's mill attachment and have used it for small aluminum stuff.
    The controller for the speed is a piece of junk. I'm not even thinking of upgrading it as the variac works well enough.
    I've made a few things for it. I have an adapter I made for the next taper mount size up ( I forget what it was but the more common size ). Things like that.
    I mostly turn brass parts on it but have done some steel.
    Dwight

  2. #12

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    I should note that I've considered making a vertical mount for it. I always worry a little about the damage to the way because of junk falling on it all the time. There is no reason that the way has to be below the work. Having it, right to left, behind make a lot of sense. I suspect it is just traditional.
    You'd get less trash on the way and easier cleanup.
    Dwight

  3. #13
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    DC has a bunch of advantages among which are low-speed torque; with AC induction motors, the torque drops as speed decreases. I've got a 48VDC motor with precision optical encoder attached; it's about the size of a tall beer can. I guarantee it'll rip your hand off if you try to stop it. You could use it for very precise speed control, but maybe that's overkill. Almost any servo motor from a daisy wheel printer will probably behave the same way. If you want to go big--I've got a Baldor DC "SCR Motor' that I picked up NOS years ago. I think the nameplate says 1/6 HP.

  4. #14
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    Here's a compact but powerful DC motor and controller package that should have ample torque: https://www.ebay.com/itm/DHL-Electric-Motor-72V-3000W-Brushless-Motor-Controller-48V-72V-50A-Scooter-Kit/283841236792

    It was used in Peter Sripol's amphibious GoKart build: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=diTMSJhuG9Q

    After watching that I considered this setup for replacing the 2-stroke snowmobile donk in my 60's vintage Banana Splits 6x6 amphibious ATV, but whether to have one and use the existing skid-steer gearbox or go with a motor and controller for each set of wheels. Two would be nice, but quite pricey by the time I shipped to Oz. Full torque from zero RPM but would surely be a reduced top speed. However I have so many projects to work on at the moment I realistically don't think I'd be getting around to it for quite a long time.

  5. #15
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    If it was used in a go-kart, it's gross overkill for a small lathe. I'm thinking if I were to go dc I could cobble something together for half that. A lot of guys were utilizing treadmill motors, and you can scrounge or get 1 new for ~40$ from Surplus Center over here.

  6. #16
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    So I found an d Craftsman disk/belt sander on the road LOL. And a router table. Man life is good. Haven't plugged any of it in yet, but the semi open frame motor on the belt sander has got to be powerful enough. I imagine I'll have to make a pulley as the Machinex uses these skinny belts.

  7. #17
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    https://www.surpluscenter.com/Electr...er-11-2269.axd

    This may represent a possibility.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    So I found an d Craftsman disk/belt sander on the road LOL. And a router table. Man life is good. Haven't plugged any of it in yet, but the semi open frame motor on the belt sander has got to be powerful enough. I imagine I'll have to make a pulley as the Machinex uses these skinny belts.
    Make sure you do continuity checks on the armature windings to the armature core, and the field windings to the body of the motor. There's usually a reason old power equipment is dumped.

    If any of the coils are shorted, the motor isn't safe to use until rewound. Rewinding a motor isn't terribly difficult, it's just a game of patience because it takes a good while to do if you don't have a coil winder.

  9. #19

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    I've only wound a 3 pole dc motor armature as a kid. I've never tried a AC/DC armature. It looks really hard to me. I have rewound a skill saw field winding. That wasn't real hard. I still have that saw and used it just about a month and a half ago. I wound it in the late 1970's, as I recall.
    Dwight

  10. #20
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    The motor is likely a series-wound ("universal") job, which generally means high RPM. Be sure that you can deal with 15K RPM speeds. Fortunately, you can just throttle one down with a lamp-dimmer type of control.

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