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Thread: New Gigabyte/Intel XP Gamer

  1. #1
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    Default New Gigabyte/Intel XP Gamer

    Back in early August I was able to purchase a Gigabyte GA-P55M-UD2 motherboard with an Intel i5-570 for $30 plus shipping, with the intent of putting together a more upscale XP gamer than my Asus A7N8X-E Deluxe. This mobo is desirable as it has PCI/PCIe/SATA/PATA, as well as USB-2 & 3. Not satisfied with the CPU, I looked around and found an I7-870 for $30 w/ free shipping. The board did not come with a rear riser bezel, so I ordered one from the orient and it arrived today, $4.95 including shipping. Most everything was here and there around the house and just needed to rounded up and put in one place.

    The following is a list of components:

    Motherboard
    Gigabyte GA-P55M-UD2 (Rev 1.1)
    Release date: Fall 2009
    ==================================
    CPU
    Intel i7-870 (1156)
    Release date: Fall 2009
    ==================================
    Memory
    Toshiba OCZ PC3 12800 (2 x 2)
    Release date: Spring 2009
    ==================================
    Video
    ATI Radeon HD 5850 PCIe
    Release Date: Summer 2009
    ==================================
    SATA SSD (System)
    SanDisk 120 GB
    Release date: Summer 2016
    ==================================
    SATA HD (Data)
    WD Enterprise Velocirapter 600 GB (10K RPM)
    Release date: Fall 2012
    ==================================
    Case
    Corsair Carbide Series 200R
    Release date: Fall 2012 (New 2020)
    ==================================
    Power Supply
    Corsair CX750
    Release date: Summer 2012
    ==================================
    Operating System
    Microsoft XP Professional (Enterprise 32-bit)
    Release Date: Fall 2001
    ==================================
    CD-ROM
    Generic DVD RW Combo (PATA)
    Release Date: Unknown
    ==================================
    Crysis
    Release Date: November 13, 2007
    ==================================

    With the exception of a very finicky power supply, which was eventually replaced, this build was a fairly straight forward and smooth affair. It's always more fun when things work as planned first timeout. As it turns out, the core components are all from 2009. I chose the Radeon HD 5850 as it has 1 GB of video memory and would play nice with XP. One thing about the 5850 is that is was an ATI product, and sure enough, there was a problem with driver set. The video driver loaded without a problem but Catalyst showed errors. You don't need Catalyst, but you want it to work just the same. I plan on ironing that one out somewhere down the line. It been my experience that ATI drivers were always somewhat troublesome to a degree. I chose Crysis for my test game as it was the most demanding game on your PC hardware of that time period. It runs fine and I can't tell the difference between this rendering and what I have on the W7 gamer - smooth and no stuttering or hang ups - just what you're looking for.

    I had this new Corsair case that was just sitting around and I decided to go ahead and use it. I'm really tired of some of those 'el cheapo' aluminum boxes that I have, you know, the ones that can slice a finger open in a heartbeat. The motherboard mounted perfectly and all of the connections were by the book with two exceptions; The front panel USB-2 cable connection is for the newer type motherboards, and there is only one 3-pin system fan connector on motherboard. The case has another built-in fan that needs to find power and that will require a Molex to fan cable adapter. The USB-2 problem will be fixed with an adapter cable which is inbound.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  2. #2
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    Hey that all sound swell. I could use a system like that around. Not sure if I have anything to trade.

    Well wait. I got 4 kittens I'd trade. That's the whole kitten kaboodle. What do you say? I'd give you the mom too, but you don't want her. I named her after a Terminator for a reason. She's a real little bioccha.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Hey that all sound swell. I could use a system like that around. Not sure if I have anything to trade.

    Well wait. I got 4 kittens I'd trade. That's the whole kitten kaboodle. What do you say? I'd give you the mom too, but you don't want her. I named her after a Terminator for a reason. She's a real little bioccha.
    Thanks for the offer but I'm going to have to pass as there are a pair of Labs to the east of me and a Jack Russell to the west that hates itself.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  4. #4
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    Lol why would a dog hate himself? A kitten or 4 would likely turn that whole situation aroumd.

  5. #5
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    The ATI/AMD Catalyst driver package is a tough nut to crack. In this XP 32-bit build I'm using a Radeon HD 5850 mainly because I have 2 of them and one is the 'black' version. The problem is not with the driver, per se, but the Catalyst option. I've attempted just about every version up to and including AMD 14-4. The install routine runs through about 90% and then you get an error message that the install has failed, but it further tells you to go ahead and reboot. The driver itself installs flawlessly. So, after a lot of research, it seems what's happening is that the Catalyst package is not 'digitally' signed. Fortunately AMD/ATI has a viewable 'log' of the install procedure which you can readily access. In this case it indicates that the 'Driver' is not signed and really doesn't make much sense as it installs anyway but faults Catalyst.

    I don't need Catalyst but like anything else in a PC, if you have it you want it to work. The last option for me is to attempt to force a manual install of the Catalyst routine. The driver set needs to be completely removed and then the command line needs to be called up. From there, 'hdwwiz.cpl' is invoked, which brings up the manual step-by-step driver install feature. No, I haven't tried it yet.

    I'm not new at this and I've been hacking around with this stuff for years, but this has me frustrated. One question at the top of my mind is why ATI/AMD didn't address these problem along the way. I suppose the answer would be in line with XP was just about out of the picture when the 5850 came along, and there isn't much help, if any, from MS either.

    So, I'm wondering if anyone out there has run into this, and if so, did you ever manage a fix.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  6. #6
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    Any game you would want to run under XP would use 2 cores or less so an i7 is a bit much.

    I have a LGA1156 system I am putting together for XP games and I went with an I3-560.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Any game you would want to run under XP would use 2 cores or less so an i7 is a bit much.

    I have a LGA1156 system I am putting together for XP games and I went with an I3-560.
    It may be a tad too much for some game requirements but this box also runs W10 really well. I like the setup so far - really pleased. I like the 870 because we can now have H/T discussions on whether or not certain XP games benefit from it.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Unknown_K View Post
    Any game you would want to run under XP would use 2 cores or less so an i7 is a bit much.

    I have a LGA1156 system I am putting together for XP games and I went with an I3-560.
    If I'm going to take on building a gamer I'm going to use, within reason, the best performance parts I can get. The i3 is about a step above the Atom and although it will run your XP games, I think it'll turnout to be a hit or miss kind of thing. As far as my i7-870 goes, the setup already has a decent motherboard and why confine myself to a "one trick pony" as it now will run anything. I have a i5-570 that available (reasonable).
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Agent Orange View Post
    So, I'm wondering if anyone out there has run into this, and if so, did you ever manage a fix.
    I had an HD5870 on Windows XP for awhile before I migrated to Windows 7. The drivers were a constant headache, and no driver version ever quite worked right. I think the most stable driver version I was able to find for Windows XP was 13.9.

    I was glad to get off of XP though because the HD5870 had 1 GB of RAM, in addition to the 4 GB of system memory. Since Windows XP doesn't support PAE, it has to comingle all of that memory in a single 4 GB address space, which usually means sacrificing a whole bunch of usable RAM. In my case, it dropped the usable RAM down to 2.5 GB. There is an ugly hack to force PAE and allow up to a 64 GB address space in 4 GB linear chunks, but it tends to make XP unstable. I tried it back then and it resulted in a very unstable system.

    The better option if you needed a 32 bit OS was to use Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise, which enabled PAE natively and could address 64 GB of RAM. The GPU memory would be addressed above 4 GB so all system memory was available.

    The Catalyst Control Center requires a bunch of .NET Framework runtimes to work, which may be why you're having problems. It usually installs that for you, but there are some instances it won't, like if you're running anything below SP3. If you can get it to work, it is very desirable because the higher end 5800 series cards with blowers have problems with overheating due to incorrect fan profiles in the driver. I had to modify mine on my HD5870 because it would overheat in demanding games.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    I had an HD5870 on Windows XP for awhile before I migrated to Windows 7. The drivers were a constant headache, and no driver version ever quite worked right. I think the most stable driver version I was able to find for Windows XP was 13.9.

    I was glad to get off of XP though because the HD5870 had 1 GB of RAM, in addition to the 4 GB of system memory. Since Windows XP doesn't support PAE, it has to comingle all of that memory in a single 4 GB address space, which usually means sacrificing a whole bunch of usable RAM. In my case, it dropped the usable RAM down to 2.5 GB. There is an ugly hack to force PAE and allow up to a 64 GB address space in 4 GB linear chunks, but it tends to make XP unstable. I tried it back then and it resulted in a very unstable system.

    The better option if you needed a 32 bit OS was to use Windows Server 2003 R2 Enterprise, which enabled PAE natively and could address 64 GB of RAM. The GPU memory would be addressed above 4 GB so all system memory was available.

    The Catalyst Control Center requires a bunch of .NET Framework runtimes to work, which may be why you're having problems. It usually installs that for you, but there are some instances it won't, like if you're running anything below SP3. If you can get it to work, it is very desirable because the higher end 5800 series cards with blowers have problems with overheating due to incorrect fan profiles in the driver. I had to modify mine on my HD5870 because it would overheat in demanding games.
    I do have XP 2003 Server NIB with 5 licenses. I've never unboxed it and I really don't know what I'm waiting for. I've got a procedure form some guy who swears it works with the 5850. It involves some registry hacks and other voodoo. My XP has SP4 and is running real well and there's no problem with the driver, which is 14-4. I do have 13-9. I getting kind of wore out trying all these different work arounds and I have 2 more to go then I calling it quits for Catalyst. My Asus C6H is due back from repair on Tuesday so I may not have much time next week to fool with it. This is number 3 and counting and I not too happy about the last one only lasting 55 days before going tango-uniform. I've been pretty lucky so I guess it's just my time in the barrel.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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