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Thread: Linux: Upgrade version or reinstall?

  1. #31
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    Really? I see icons on my desktop. Ubuntu dropped the "Unity" desktop and went back to something that resembles Gnome 3. But I use XFCE4 (xubuntu). It's simple and easy to work with.

  2. #32
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    well that's a good thing then. No sense in trying to be different when you're botching everyone up.

    you haven't said when they switched back. I installed 18.nn or some such and the horror was still there.

  3. #33
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    Well, this is from Wikip:

    On 5 April 2017, Mark Shuttleworth announced that Canonical's work on Unity would end. Ubuntu 18.04 LTS, a year away from release at the time, would abandon the Unity desktop and employ the GNOME 3 desktop instead. UBports founder Marius Gripsgård announced that the organization would continue Unity development. On 27 February 2020, UBports announced that it renamed Unity 8 Lomiri.

    In May 2020, a new unofficial Ubuntu version was first released. Ubuntu Unity uses the Unity 7 desktop.
    I've never used Unity, myself. XFCE4 and LXDE have been my desktops of choice.

  4. #34

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    Yeah, Unity and GNOME 3 were a laughable dumpster fire.

    That said, I've found that desktop icons are more trouble than they're worth, particularly on smaller screens where they're going to be obscured 90% of the time. I switched to plain WindowMaker plus a decent file manager after using XFCE initially, and I really don't find that I miss anything by not having desktop icons.
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  5. #35
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    the point is to lessen the shock for people transitioning from os to another. I kind of like Windows, am used to it. As are billions of other people. I don't like M$. But I don't want an entirely new way of doing things forced on my. Nor endless bells and whistles. Leave it the way people are used to, and let them add features as an option. No one is impressed.

    I used Pop! OS for a short time. I liked the whole get more done/waste less time theme. But I couldn't get comfortable with it. It took some sort of weirdo voodoo for you to actually install a user account post install. I did it once, couldn't do it again. It's just a flash in the pan anyway.

  6. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Well, this is from Wikip:



    I've never used Unity, myself. XFCE4 and LXDE have been my desktops of choice.
    it is Gnome 3 I had the problem with. Perhaps it was an earlier version of Ubuntu, 16,04 maybe. The live Kubuntu environment had it right (I think). Regardless of what it's called, if it's new and fandangled, I won't like it.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    it is Gnome 3 I had the problem with. Perhaps it was an earlier version of Ubuntu, 16,04 maybe. The live Kubuntu environment had it right (I think). Regardless of what it's called, if it's new and fandangled, I won't like it.
    Ubuntu uses Gnome/Unity as the DE by default
    Kubuntu uses KDE
    Xubuntu uses XFCE
    Lubuntu uses LXDE

    And there are probably others with other lesser used DEs.

    It was nicer 10 or so years ago when DEs weren't defaulted to one or another and you could choose between a list of available DEs. Now they have a different base distro for every DE for Ubuntu at least. You can go back and install a different DE using the package manager, and even have multiple DEs at the same time, but it can cause problems.

  8. #38
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    ok I made a big mistake. Replace all above occurrences of Kubuntu with Lubuntu. That's what I tried out briefly, not just a live environment, and was happier with the ui.

  9. #39

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    One of the points Chuck made that may have been glossed over is that he uses multiple partitions for different mount locations. He mentioned a partition for '/usr' (although he may have meant '/home'). I also use a few strategies to easily manage my home directory. The OS can come and go, but my home directory is really what counts. As such, I use a Debian based network server to keep my "official" home directory with files and configurations. Debian serves all my OSes, from Linux to OS/X to *BSD to Windows (3.1 to 7) to MacOS - even my Apple IIs. What this means that the OS installed is easily separated from my really important personal files.

    With a separate partition (or drive) for the files you don't want wiped out during an OS upgrade or fresh install, it's less stressful to update the OS or try a different flavor with fewer repercussions. Even re-installing the apps you like after a fresh install isn't too troublesome if your personal configuration files don't get wiped out. I will keep a copy of system configuration files in a sub-directory of my home directory so it's easy to restore them after a fresh OS install. With the network home directory, a quick 'fstab' edit gets my home directory mounted over the network.

    Anyway, I didn't want Chuck's useful partition scheme to go unnoticed.

  10. #40
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    Yup /home it is--when I wrote it, I was wondering if the scheme could be extended with any benefit to /usr--probably not.

    Really simple to do on a fresh install--and then your own stuff is segregated from the system stuff.

    How about other variants, such as OpenSuse or Oracle Linux? I know that there's quite a CentOS following out there. Then there's Open Solaris/OpenIndiana/illumos, which is not quite Linux.
    Last edited by Chuck(G); October 16th, 2020 at 10:48 PM.

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