Image Map Image Map
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 11 to 14 of 14

Thread: Company management using Windows 2000 in 2020

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    8,095
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The only good thing about backing up to floppies is that you lose only a bit of data when each one fails. I don't think any 3.5" media is very reliable for long term storage.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    35,150
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    What do you consider "long term"? I've still got very readable 3.5" floppies from the early 1980s. (single sided, done on Sony 0AD31 drives for the Preis luggable). For longevity, I'll take DS2D over DSHD any day.

  3. #13

    Default

    The floppies are "OK" as long as they can recover the system from utter disaster (HD and/or MB failure).

    If they can be read by a modern machine using a USB Floppy drive, it should be fine. But, in the end, backups are only as good as the hardware/software that can recover them.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York, USA
    Posts
    201

    Default

    What happens if the computer does more than just die? Assuming a fire or flood turns it into a pile of steaming poo, can they easily find a replacement computer to read the stored 720K disks? Plus are the backups stored on site or off site? On the web? Ask people on the left coast what's left of their business after a wild fire takes out a town or two. A 10 foot flood of brown water would gum up the drives a bit, I'd guess. Bad enough having to rebuild, but not being able to recover their files due to lack of hardware to read safely stored backups would put the final nails in that coffin.
    Crazy old guy with a basement full of Pentium 1 laptops and parts

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •