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Thread: My Packard Bell Legend 2276 486 Tower - repair, restoration, and upgrades:

  1. #1

    Default My Packard Bell Legend 2276 486 Tower - repair, restoration, and upgrades:

    Greetings VCF. I have not made a real forum post in a while. I'm getting tired of the format of FB groups and Reddit so I'll start posting a bit more here.

    This is my Packard Bell Legend 2276. I would consider this to be my "unicorn" PC. It's the same as the original PC my family purchased in 1993, our foray into the internet age.

    PBLOREZ.jpg

    I am aware of the battery problems 486 Packard Bell motherboards of this vintage often have, and since this computer was somewhat able to POST, I was willing to take a chance on it. Especially considering it included the matching display, keyboard, and mouse (I really like having complete systems)

    pb410screen.jpg

    The unit arrived well packed, I got it home to inspect to what extent my board had been battery damaged. It didn't look bad at first compared to some others I have seen:

    PB10 battery.jpg

    I did a bit of cleaning, but after magnifying the damage a bit more with my phone it became apparent that cleaning alone would not repair the damage to this board:

    PB410IC damage.jpg

    It was apparent to me I'd have to have a friend of mine look at my board. He's very good at soldiering and SMT repairs.
    That evening I did some research and found anther person with nearly the same board who had just about the same problem I had. Apparently if you have a PB410 motherboard, battery damage is likely to damage U49. Here is the other example I found:
    https://erickenny.wordpress.com/2019...kard-bell-486/

    This is the first image he send me, taken with his phone through his microscope:
    badboard.jpg

    He got to work repairing the board traces and removing acid and corrosion from the chip. Here is a progress pic he sent me a few hours later look closely at the tiny traces he repaired under the microscope. I placed it next to a "before" image so you can see what he had fixed:
    repair.jpg

    And finally, as it sits now. This is the factory chip, it looks new. My friend asked me to go ahead and test the system out. He was concerned that heat applied to the chip during repair and removal of corrosion may have caused damage and advised me the check it out so we could order a replacement for U49 if necessary.
    repair2.jpg

    I attached an improvised 3V external battery to the external battery connection and booted up the system. BIOS configuration was able to be set. No random keyboard, checksum errors, beeps, or other stuff.

    Couldn't get the system to boot from drive A. Probably another bad 3.5 floppy drive. No problem, unlike my PS/2 systems these standard drives are pretty easy to get. I went ahead a placed an order for a silver ALPS from eBay. I installed a floppy emulator, booted DOS, then ran Norton diags for a basic checkout:

    diags.jpg

    cool. 486DX/2 66 and 4MB onboard ram. A little better than the original system my family had with a 33MHz 486. Next up, BIOS update. Minor annoyance is that this system is not Y2K compatible. Setting the clock past 1999 causes errors. I'd like to update my BIOS, but I don't think this system is capable of being flashed. Bios menu is kind of limited. No BOOT order, limited HDD options etc.
    bios.jpg

    I'd really like a 1.01.24E BIOS chip (or a copy I could burn) if anyone has that. I don't think I can even do a Pentium overdrive with the current version.

    I heard that Micro Firmware made one also, if anyone has information on how I could track that one down it would be great.

    Next up: Hard drive, OS (windows 3.11 / MS Dos 6.22), new A: drive (B 5.25 works great) 486DX/4 -100 and 32MB ram. My system already had the video memory updated to 1MB. 512KB cache upgrade also.

    board.jpg

  2. #2

    Default

    Rolled the dice on some Chinese IC's for my 512kb cache upgrade. Guess we will see how this works out next month

    cache.jpg

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Austin, Texas
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplethings View Post
    I don't think I can even do a Pentium overdrive with the current version.
    You can't use a Pentium Overdrive at all, the motherboard doesn't have the correct socket. You need a motherboard with either Socket 2 or Socket 3, and it appears yours has Socket 1. The latter two sockets have 238/237 pins while Socket 1 only has 169 pins. The POD utilizes the extra row of pins and won't fit.

    A DX/4 also won't work in this machine. It's a 3 volt part and Socket 1 only supports 5 volt CPUs. The only way you'll get to 100 MHz is by using a special 486 Overdrive, or one of the 3rd party upgrade solutions like the Kingston Turbochip or the Evergreen 586.

    If you already bought a DX4, DO NOT install it in the motherboard, you will damage or destroy the CPU.

  4. #4

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GiGaBiTe View Post
    You can't use a Pentium Overdrive at all, the motherboard doesn't have the correct socket. You need a motherboard with either Socket 2 or Socket 3, and it appears yours has Socket 1. The latter two sockets have 238/237 pins while Socket 1 only has 169 pins. The POD utilizes the extra row of pins and won't fit.

    A DX/4 also won't work in this machine. It's a 3 volt part and Socket 1 only supports 5 volt CPUs. The only way you'll get to 100 MHz is by using a special 486 Overdrive, or one of the 3rd party upgrade solutions like the Kingston Turbochip or the Evergreen 586.

    If you already bought a DX4, DO NOT install it in the motherboard, you will damage or destroy the CPU.
    This is a Packard Bell PB410 motherboard: PB410MB.jpg
    My CPU is installed currently in the overdrive socket. Earlier revisions of the board had a non-removable CPU socket onboard, but mine is not populated.

    http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/410.htm

    Unless I'm totally mistaken it will support my DX4ODPR100 just fine, with the correct jumper settings. and a Pentium Overdrive 83mhz with a BIOS update.
    Last edited by Simplethings; November 1st, 2020 at 04:17 AM.

  5. #5

    Default

    I have found what may be an update for my PB410 BIOS on The Internet Archive. A user FooneTuring has uploaded the contents from this IC, from an apparent PB410 motherboard:
    https://archive.org/details/packard_bell_PY4307_03_bios
    This is SYS ver 1.01.18E, my current BIOS is 1.01.17E. I don't have the hardware to make a copy at the moment, but I'll probably give it a try later. I'd really like a rip of 1.01.25 as I believe that may have been the final version of the BIOS by Packard Bell for this system.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
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    Austin, Texas
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplethings View Post
    Unless I'm totally mistaken it will support my DX4ODPR100 just fine, with the correct jumper settings.
    DX4ODPR100 is an Overdrive CPU designed to upgrade early 486 motherboards with Socket 1, or the overdrive socket. They have built in circuitry to run clock doubled or tripled, and a built in voltage regulator to drop the 5 volts socket down to 3 volts. Overdrive 486 CPUs should not be confused with regular 486 CPUs. A 486 DX4 is not an Overdrive DX4.

    Quote Originally Posted by Simplethings View Post
    and a Pentium Overdrive 83mhz with a BIOS update.
    Like I just said in my previous post, a Pentium Overdrive has 238 pins, while your socket only has 169 pins. It will never work because it won't fit.

  7. #7

    Default

    overdrive.jpg

    This is my socket? I'm not sure what's going on here? What are you trying to explain? Are you telling me I have a 169 pin socket one? It's not like I'm just pulling this stuff from thin air. I did plenty of reading before I came here. I know what my PB410 motherboard is. Earlier revisions had a soldered in 169 pin CPU with a vacant overdrive socket, later versions came with a non-populated 169 pin CPU socket (see the vacant spot on my motherboard?) with a 486 overdrive processor already installed in the overdrive socket from the factory. The documentation for this board states that a P24T Pentium overdrive can be installed in the socket, but only if a bios update to version 1.01.24 or 1.01.25 is done beforehand.

    http://www.uktsupport.co.uk/pb/mb/410.htm
    Last edited by Simplethings; November 1st, 2020 at 05:48 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Austin, Texas
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    2,210

    Default

    Why don't you just take your CPU out of the socket to see what you have? I don't know what's difficult about explaining that 238 pins will not fit in a 169 pin socket. The pictures of your motherboard that you provided appear to have a 169 pin socket, which is this:



    And this is a normal 486 compared to a Pentium Overdrive. The 486 is on top and the Pentium Overdrive is on bottom. Notice that the Pentium Overdrive has four rows of pins compared to 3 on the 486? It will physically not fit in a 169 pin socket and will not work.



    The picture you just linked to is Socket 3, which has 238 pins and is REQUIRED for a Pentium Overdrive to work. The reason I say you don't have this socket is because if you did, there'd be a vacant row of pins around your 486 overdrive that could be seen from above, which is not the case in all pictures you have provided. Without removing the CPU from the socket, I can't be 100% certain which socket you have.

  9. #9

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    I'm not yanking my processor until I get my cache upgrade.
    Here is another PB410 motherboard. The same one.
    https://threader.app/thread/1286341832583110657

  10. #10

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    also I CAN PHYISICALLY SEE THE VACANT ROW ON THE OUTSIDE OF MY PROCESSOR. You are making be prove something I NEVER ASKED YOU. YOU KEEP TAKING MY THREAD OFF TOPIC.

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