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Thread: Seeking 8-bit etherent card that will work with AT&T 6300

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    Chuck, you mentioned a Linux based network. I am a little confused by that statement. Most home networks are Linux in general if you're using OpenWRT or DDWRT.

    I tried to stand up a telnet session between the AT&T and Windows 2000 machine. While I was able to set up the Windows 2000 machine as a telnet server, I received an error when I tried the telnet out from AT&T to it. The reported error was associated with the network trust link service being desired by the windows 2000 machine. Apparently, the network trust link agent must be on AT&T to make the connection work. Right now, I am thinking I need to stand up a Linux machine for telnet and for FTP. I wanted to ask how you handle telnet and FTP on your system in other words what system are you using for your server? I understand your static addressing, I just wanted to find out what you're using for a server.

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    No--I mean that almost all of my hosts run Linux, not Windows; They're mostly Debian or Ubuntu, although there are a couple that are OpenBSD. FWIW, I don't have any problem telnet-ing to them using Mike's telnet client.

    I'm not up to snuff on Windows NT networking--I recall that it was a bother in XP because one also had to install IIS.

    I'm sure there are others who can help out, though!

  3. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by alejack12001 View Post
    The reported error was associated with the network trust link service being desired by the windows 2000 machine. Apparently, the network trust link agent must be on AT&T to make the connection work.
    Telnet is not much more than a raw TCP link. There is no such thing as a "network trust link" or similar in this protocol.

    I suspect your Windows 2000 machine has some sort of firewall or 3rd party software installed, or that there are some other issues in your local network. Please post the exact error message from both Windows 2000 and the DOS box.

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    It's been a long time since Windows Server was even remotely my bag, but if I had to hazard a guess the Windows 2000 telnet server is probably trying to use kerberos or NTLM instead of password authentication. You're probably SOL trying to get that to work on an 8086 client. You can try this to make it take cleartext auth.

    https://www.netadmintools.com/art246.html
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    However, there were many third-party telnet servers for 2K and XP (and NT). Here's an example. I can't make any claims for it, however. Google around--I suspect that you'll find a good one.

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    Maybe a little off-topic, but sometimes I use a really trash method to allow my Tandy 1000 to telnet into my Apple Macbook: I installed "socat" with Homebrew and when I want to telnet in I run this in a terminal session:

    export TERM=ansi
    socat exec:'bash -l',pty,stderr,setsid,sigint,sane TCP-LISTEN:1234,bind=(interface IP of laptop)

    Again, this is total trash because the listening socket it opens doesn't have any authentication, it'll "just go" with the first client to connect to it, but I only run this on a trusted network segment and it saves having to formally start a telnet service. This is on macOS but presumably it'd work on a Linux host too.
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    To the responder Svenska, the messages I received initially using telnet on the AT&T were strange as the Win 2K machine seemed to look for NTLS from the sender. The exact message was "Error NTSL not received from the sender."

    I tinkered with the Win 2K machine and this morning I did make a brief connection using telnet. The method that was used involved sessiontype as raw and the IP address of the Win 2K with the defaulted port 23. Mr. Brutman's software provided a shell with the display of what appeared like high-level characters like a face or square root symbol or whatever. I know that I put a message on the telnet server that was a welcome message. However, I believe that was the gist of the high-level message received at logon although the characters weren't standard ASCII. I remember seeing this type of text when I used to telnet via the modem to the university computers years ago, however, I don't recall the command to switch back to ASCII. As Eudimorphodon pointed out the MTCP is mostly outbound and not inbound connectivity.

    I tried sending pings to AT&T and didn't receive a reply, however, I can ping my Win 2K without any difficulty from AT&T. It's odd that Mr. Brutman's software includes an FTPSVR, which seems to allow bidirectional connectivity. His documentation is a bit of a tough read as Trixter pointed out. I believe as I spend more time with the software I can learn more of how it works. Thanks to all who have responded to this inquiry.

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    I didn't say it was a tough read; I said it was comprehensive and should answer all of your configuration questions.

    mTCP is not a full TCP/IP stack. It is a set of programs that allow you to perform various common services. It doesn't load anything resident; if you want inbound communication to your 6300, you run either FTPSRV or HTTPSRV. All of the rest of the programs are outbound. Your 6300 will not respond to pings, as mTCP is not capable of loading something resident to respond to inbound ICMP.
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  9. #59

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    Quote Originally Posted by alejack12001 View Post
    To the responder Svenska, the messages I received initially using telnet on the AT&T were strange as the Win 2K machine seemed to look for NTLS from the sender. The exact message was "Error NTSL not received from the sender."
    That means you need to configure your Win2k machine to not require NTLS for its Telnet service.

    You should also be able to use PuTTY on any other computer to connect to the Win2k machine using Telnet. Unless you get that to work correctly and reliably, the AT&T machine is just another possible source of misconfigurations. First make sure that your server (Win2k) actually works correctly, then start dealing with the client.

    TCP connections - that includes telnet - do not behave like modem connections; there is no line noise. If you see weird characters, then you are likely hitting the server sending some binary data trying to run some authentication protocol. You also don't need to switch to ASCII.

    Quote Originally Posted by alejack12001 View Post
    It's odd that Mr. Brutman's software includes an FTPSVR, which seems to allow bidirectional connectivity.
    Well, mTCP does not include responses to unsolicited packets while it is not running...

  10. Default

    Thanks to all who gave their feedback. Yes, the NTLM or NTLS or whatever is some sort of authentication routine that must be turned off. I have more reading to do there.

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