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Thread: AMD Ryzen 9 5900X

  1. #11
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    Dwight

    Speaking for myself, I've built quite a few middle to high-end gamers in the past. I don't get into the super chips and nitro cooling and such, as that end of gaming is in a world of its own - very pricey.

    However, for the average person the intel i9 10900K and the AMD 9 5950X are extreme, but not out of reach. Cooling has always been a major problem and 2 of my last gamers, one being an Intel i7 6700K, and the other an AMD 5 3600, both had Corsair liquid cooling. Both cases had 6 or 8 fans and the 6700K rig had twin 1080 video cards. Neither of those gamers experienced any form of overheating. My present gamer has a 7 3700X with a stock fan assembly which came with the CPU as well as the Crosshair Hero Windows 7 project gamer which now has a 5 3600 CPU. Both of these gamers are in Corsair cases with 5 fans. Most of the newer high end motherboards have BIOS settings to 'shut down' if they get to warm.

    When it becomes available and at a reasonable uninflated price, I looking to install an AMD 9 5900X in my X570 gamer. This chip does not come with a fan assembly so you have to provide your own. I don't want to do liquid cooling so I'm going for a Noctua NH-D15 fan assembly which is more or less the Cadillac of cooling fans. Hopefully I will be able to get the mods done before Christmas.

    Tom
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  2. #12
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    What's crazy about this 5900X upgrade thing is the pricing. Although all of the big retailers are sold out, Walmart advertised the lowest at $449.99 and the rest were about $549.00. Some outfit named 'NextWareHouse' has them in stock now for $698.99. If you go over on to Epay, there's just about any price you can imagine, as I saw one offered for over $1100. I did get an email from B&H Photo and they said about January 1st. I suppose I'm going to have to shelve my ambitions on this one until the dust clears. Unless there's a dramatic price decrease after the first of the year it looks to be a spring 2021 project.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  3. #13

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    Both Nvidia and AMD clearly misread the demand. AMD, needs to keep a tight ship. They need to order wafers far in advance and substrate silicon is tight now as well. When Intel was leading, they could stall producing new designs until the stock was running low. AMD with its 1.5 to 2 year cadence is its own worst competition.
    I suspect it will be tight, even in January. Anyway, good luck. If Intel ever gets their advance finfet working, they'll be hard to beat but it is still a tough design to mass produce. To make things fast, you end up with a leaky P channel. If they can make a surround gate, things will change.
    It is all magic anyway.
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    Dwight

  4. #14
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    It's hard for the average person who is not close to the actual manufacturing end of these new processors to image over 2 billion, yes with a 'b', transistors all tucked in nice and neat on a postage stamp sized platform. It looks like Intel is having major problems with their 7 nano design but their high end chips are still great performers. The major difference between AMD and Intel is that Intel does not support backward compatibility as well as AMD does, and that forces gamers/enthusiasts to constantly purchase new motherboards because of a chip format change. AMD has done a real good job in that area.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  5. #15
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    Dang blast it, wouldn't you just know it. My local MicroCenter has 3 5900X's in stock but you can't get to 'em. They closed the store right before "Black Friday" for a De-C19 cleaning top to bottom, and they didn't say when they were going to reopen.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  6. #16

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    When I first started, you could see the transistors and interconnects in an optical microscope. Now you need an electron microscope.
    The fact the the chips work at all with so many parts that most all have to be working. They do usually have a number of spare memory columns for larger arrays that can be fuse selected but the rest of the circuitry either works or it doesn't. There are advantages and disadvantages to making smaller dimensions. Capacitance goes down but resistance goes up. They mostly kept the same power per square inch over the last 4 or 5 generations. They've done this by reducing the voltage, capacitance and turning of circuits that are not required for the particular operation that is active. People are saying that we are quickly reaching the limits of silicon transistors. Still, 3 nm parts are in the near future for production. They are making some 5 nm part right now. Soon they'll be making the processors with this technology.
    When we reach the limits, no one knows.
    Good luck on getting your hands on one of the new chips but do realize, it is only temporary and in a couple years, you'll have an interesting collectors machine.
    Dwight

  7. #17
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    Up until recent years, AMD had their own foundry. Now they have to rely on outside resources, which I think, puts a crimp into their production plans. Never understood that move.

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Up until recent years, AMD had their own foundry. Now they have to rely on outside resources, which I think, puts a crimp into their production plans. Never understood that move.
    AMD sold off the foundries to create Global Foundries because that was what was left for AMD to sell off. They had already done the classic stunts to get short term cash like selling and then leasing back the headquarters building. AMD could either sell foundries or close down.

    As it stands, Global Foundries has had major problems getting new processes to work so the current chips have a mix of chiplets with the traditional CPU portion manufactured by TSMC and the I/O portion done on the less effective Global Foundries process. This maximizes the number of chips that AMD can make. Sticking with Global Foundries would leave AMD trying to sell chips made with a comparatively slow and power hungry process.

  9. #19
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    AMD sold off their foundries because they didn't have the resources to keep up with upgrading them. Same reason everybody else except Intel doesn't have their own fabs anymore and just outsource production. Even now where AMD is selling all the chips they can make and are booming their market share and profitability are a small fraction of Intels. During the bad years they were loosing money like crazy and didn't have any cash to support the FABs they did have.

    If you look at how much more expensive each generation of deign costs over the years you see that nobody can really afford them. Global Foundries isn't cutting edge still stuck at 14nm and they gave up trying 7nm. Their FAB 8 cost $15B in upgrades over a decade and is pretty much obsolete for cutting edge CPUs. Fortunately for them they can use that process to make custom chips for other companies.

    TSMC is the worlds most expensive semiconductor company and all they do is make other people chips for them.
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  10. #20
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    I should note that IBM used to be a tech leader in Semiconductors doing major research in pushing the tech and production facilities and they ended up not being able to support their production anymore and sold their division to Global Foundries.
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