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Thread: Is anyone using wirewrapping for fabricating projects?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2016
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    Muskego, Wisconsin
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    Default Is anyone using wirewrapping for fabricating projects?

    I still wirewrap my projects, but wirewrap supplies are getting scarcer.

    Can anyone recommend a source for sockets? Jameco has them, but they are quite expensive now!
    eBay ain't much better.

    And did anyone use "Wrap-ID's"? I loved those little plastic labels. They made wiring much easier.
    The ones I could locate online request a king's ransom to purchase

    Solderless bread-boarding is fine for small and temporary projects ..

    So, how is everyone fabricating now? Or has computer fabricating gone the way of gaslights

    (And yes, I do have several Arduinos, so I know about them too! )

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
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    I've always found Phoenix Enterprises in California a reliable source of wire-wrap sockets and a lot of other connectors, etc. They even have wire wrap SIPs for making custom sockets.

    https://www.peconnectors.com/wire-wr...s-and-headers/

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9KEP View Post
    I still wirewrap my projects, but wirewrap supplies are getting scarcer.
    Do you have a source of small wire wrap boards? I'm having to buy find wrapped boards and unwrapping them.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by KC9KEP View Post
    So, how is everyone fabricating now? Or has computer fabricating gone the way of gaslights
    I do very little fabricating these days but, if I need to, I have a little CNC machine that I can use to mill my own prototype boards.
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phone sucks because it comes through the internet.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Exceter View Post
    .... I have a little CNC machine that I can use to mill my own prototype boards....
    How much is the cost of that CNC machine, if I may ask?
    Do you use it for other applications...

    ziloo

  6. #6

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    I ought to be using wire wrap for prototyping this stuff with a billion bus connections. It'd make things so much easier.....

    I did buy a big pile of wire wrap boards off of ebay, but I haven't gotten 'round to unwrapping them and salvaging all the sockets yet.
    -- Lee
    If you get super-bored, try muh crappy YouTube channel: Old Computer Fun!
    Looking to Buy/Trade For (non-working is fine): Tandy 1000 EX/HX power supply, Mac IIci hard drive sled and one bottom rubber foot, Multisync VGA CRTs, Decent NuBus video card, PC-era Tandy stuff, Weird Old Unix Stuff, Aesthetic Old Serial Terminals (HP and Data General in particular)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by ziloo View Post
    How much is the cost of that CNC machine, if I may ask?
    Do you use it for other applications...

    ziloo
    You could modify a 3d printer. Make a bracket for a dremel to go where the extruder would sit.
    Slow by cnc standards, but you only need to remove fractions of an inch off the copper, and the competition is shipping from China.
    The other downside is that getting the layers to line up would be a huge hassle.
    Current favorites: IBM 5160 (EGA+Hercules+PGC, 8 floppy drives, XT-IDE), DCC D-116 (Nova 1200 clone), ASR 33 Teletype, PDP-8/I (lots of issues, restoration underway)
    Wishlist: IBM 5161 (expansion chassis), Diablo 31/RK02/RK05 or equivalent, Data General equipment, DEC TU55 or TU56, and the meaning of life.

  8. #8

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    I have less than $1000 in it. It was originally a kit from ZenToolworks but I wouldn't recommend getting one from them these days. They're highly overpriced. Getting an X-Carve or a Shapeoko would be my recommendation. Mine has a plastic frame it's really not usable for milling metal but it works great on plastic, wood, and PCB's.
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phone sucks because it comes through the internet.

  9. #9
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    I use blank single-sided PCB stock and drill for pins. That gives me a solid ground plane. Drill the holes on a press, relieve the copper on the reverse side, punch in your pins (I use an automatic center punch for that. Run the power busses on the top side using bare copper wire and bob's your uncle.

    At one time, prefab WW boards for various bus types were common. I think most of those have wound up with the gold scrappers. They weren't cheap when new and are probably insane now.

    The other aspect is that the world has moved on to SMT, which is much less accommodating to WW.

  10. #10

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    I stumbled across this today and thought some of you might find it interesting: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aXCVTPdhhss
    Once upon a time, the internet sucked because it came through the phone. Now the phone sucks because it comes through the internet.

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