Image Map Image Map
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: modern memory issues

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    2,422

    Default modern memory issues

    I was scanning the tested memory pdf for an older mobo I have (Asus Mining Expert, B150 chipset). It's a mobo, don't laugh at me. Actually has audio built in and such. Regardless there was an extensive list of memory that was certified (or was it just tested). But some of the kits I've been spying on Newegg this week don't turn up on the list at all. If at all possible I would like to buy some nice Corsair memory. I currently have a 4gb Gskill Aegis stick, has no issues (didn't check if that was on it). I have also used a crucial stick with the same mobo in the past (I got rid of my first one). So in general desktop systems don't have many problems with various vendors/skues or whatever. But there are exceptions. For instance if you buy memory for an Intel board and later want to move it to an AMD board ... well, some issues may crop up. But are they common?

    I'm a superficial moron, and besides the RGB Corsair stuff, I also like Oloy (Warhawk) and Geil Evo X, which specifically mentions it as for AMD. The Oloy mentions both. Will the Geil not work with an Intel board? I really think I should stick with Corsair, but what the hell do I know??

    Your thoughts please.

    Servers are more picky. I only have an 8gb stick in my Supermicro workstation, and it was certified for that board (but came at a bit of a bargain, as it was a discontinue skues). Would really like to upgrade that also. I passed up a certified 64gb kit some time ago, a little over 200$ with a discount/rebate. That still smarts. I guess there will be other deals.
    Last edited by tipc; November 24th, 2020 at 04:06 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    SE MI
    Posts
    5,174
    Blog Entries
    6

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    I was scanning the tested memory pdf for an older mobo I have (Asus Mining Expert, B150 chipset). It's a mobo, don't laugh at me. Actually has audio built in and such. Regardless there was an extensive list of memory that was certified (or was it just tested). But some of the kits I've been spying on Newegg this week don't turn up on the list at all. If at all possible I would like to buy some nice Corsair memory. I currently have a 4gb Gskill Aegis stick, has no issues (didn't check if that was on it). I have also used a crucial stick with the same mobo in the past (I got rid of my first one). So in general desktop systems don't have many problems with various vendors/skues or whatever. But there are exceptions. For instance if you buy memory for an Intel board and later want to move it to an AMD board ... well, some issues may crop up. But are they common?

    I'm a superficial moron, and besides the RGB Corsair stuff, I also like Oloy (Warhawk) and Geil Evo X, which specifically mentions it as for AMD. The Oloy mentions both. Will the Geil not work with an Intel board? I really think I should stick with Corsair, but what the hell do I know??

    Your thoughts please.

    Servers are more picky. I only have an 8gb stick in my Supermicro workstation, and it was certified for that board (but came at a bit of a bargain, as it was a discontinue skues). Would really like to upgrade that also. I passed up a certified 64gb kit some time ago, a little over 200$ with a discount/rebate. That still smarts. I guess there will be other deals.
    Memories are made of this: For me GSkill is one of the best around and generally the one I use in my top gamer. However, GSkill can be a group of anal orifices if you need technical support or have a quality issue, which really is not a factor these days. Also, IMHO anything Corsair is okay.

    Tom
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Pacific Northwest, USA
    Posts
    35,686
    Blog Entries
    18

    Default

    Wouldn't the reliability depend mostly on whose and what kind of chips the vendors use? Is there a real difference between vendors using the same Hynix, Micron or Samsung chips? (There aren't very many DRAM manufacturers).

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,862
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    There are also differences between manufacturers suggested memory settings. https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews...ddr4-3600-16gb shows one example that performs nicely with systems that support ddr4-3600 but falls back to a very slow 2133 on budget Intel boards.

    LEDs plus overclocked memory: no thank you. I want nice stable memory. I would prefer it if ECC prices would drop.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    8,155
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Wouldn't the reliability depend mostly on whose and what kind of chips the vendors use? Is there a real difference between vendors using the same Hynix, Micron or Samsung chips? (There aren't very many DRAM manufacturers).
    Reliability depends on the grade of chips you use and how much you push them.

    If you ever checked the information on generic current RAM purchased new from China via ebay you will find that the serial numbers of all the sticks are the same and they probably use the lowest grade chips they can and just overclock them (make more $$$).

    For older RAM types this generally isn't a problem because the process on making them has all the bugs worked out but new cutting edge RAM is a different story.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    2,422

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by krebizfan View Post
    LEDs plus overclocked memory: no thank you. I want nice stable memory. I would prefer it if ECC prices would drop.
    Whereas overclocking could be a detriment to stability, I can't see how the addition of led lightning would.

    You want cheaper ecc ram do you? Get in line

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    4,862
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    Whereas overclocking could be a detriment to stability, I can't see how the addition of led lightning would.

    You want cheaper ecc ram do you? Get in line
    Heat is heat and LEDs will add heat by drawing power. Now, if there was an advantage to having LEDs hidden inside the case, I would be all for it but I can't think of one.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Principality of Xeon W-2140B the Great State of Central New Jerky
    Posts
    2,422

    Default

    come on live a little.

    Besides if you began building pc's with an lga771 server board (in reality the first build in around 20 years), you would understand the importance of cooling. Like leave the side panel off and aim a desk fan at the board and just learn to love it. LEDs don't produce a lot of heat. With adequate cooling, I should think, that won't be an issue. But what do I know ...

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    8,155
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tipc View Post
    come on live a little.

    Besides if you began building pc's with an lga771 server board (in reality the first build in around 20 years), you would understand the importance of cooling. Like leave the side panel off and aim a desk fan at the board and just learn to love it. LEDs don't produce a lot of heat. With adequate cooling, I should think, that won't be an issue. But what do I know ...
    Or just get a case with decent cooling.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    2,262

    Default

    There are only a handful of major DRAM manufacturers in the world that make the majority of memory used by the world. Compatibility is mostly down to module configuration, memory density and SPD configuration.

    The major players in today's market are SK Hynix, Micron and Samsung. There are dozens of smaller DRAM manufacturers, but if you look at your Kingston, G.Skill or Geil memory modules, they'll have memory chips from one of these three companies.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •