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Thread: Very cheap P4 (socket 423) mobos on ebay

  1. #1
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    Default Very cheap P4 (socket 423) mobos on ebay

    Not atx but so cheap:

    https://www.ebay.com/itm/Dell-Dimens...w/363175481234

    I never even heard of a socket 423. There are some available for 10$ shipped. Check speeds though. I bet any will work but what do I know.

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    Socket 423 handles only the very first Pentium 4s getting up to 2 GHz. Note, if I remember the look of the slots correctly, that motherboard needs RAMBUS RIMMs which will be very expensive.

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    There were adapters to get a Socket 478 P4 to work in a 423 socket, but, like a lot of early P4 systems, the performance would be underwhelming. And, of course, you need the proper Dell case for these.

    Even early 478 boards were a bit disappointing; I'm thinking of the early IBM Netvista systems--best used for their cases.

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    It's a Dell board and unless you have the case it might take some smithing to get that board to fit right because of the proprietary riser bezel.
    Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

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    If you want an early RAMBUS P4 get a whole system, they will be collectable someday. I don't like early P4's much but I do have at least one with SDRAM (Thinkcentre with p4-1.6 I think).

    Those boards are cheap because they are not meant for ATX cases and used funky power supplies as well.
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    I gave away a P4 board that used PC133 SDRAM; it was a dog. RIMM has to be better.

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    The SDRAM was used on the older P4's that were slow anyway, the later 3ghz LGA775 P4's with DDR were not too bad.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
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    The SDRAM i845 motherboards were noticeably slower than the i845 RAMBUS equivalents with the same CPU but SDRAM was the way to get large amounts of RAM affordably. Looking at a 2001 ad, 256 MB SDRAM cost 25% of the 256 MB RIMM and finding any RIMMs was a matter of calling lots of vendors because supplies were just that lacking. Putting together a tolerable XP system required SDRAM until DDR became common. Whatever performance benefits high speed RAMBUS provides are overwhelmed to the slow down from swapping.

    One other drawback with the empty motherboards is that any memory slot that doesn't get a RIMM will need a memory terminator which seem to be even harder to find today.

  9. #9
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    RDRAM being paired with the Pentium 4 was a really terrible idea. Netburst was a weak architecture to start that required lots of low latency cache and low latency main memory to perform halfway decent, neither which it had until late in the Pentium 4 life and DDR2. Only the final Prescott and Cedar Mill cores with 2M of cache and DDR2 had any sort of decent performance. The final Tualatin PIII-S 1400 wasn't soundly outperformed by the Pentium 4 until it reached speeds nearing 2 GHz. A dual Tualatin system could hold ground with even faster Pentium 4s that had Hyper Threading.

    RDRAM was touted for its high bandwidth, but the problem is that it also had very high latency compared to SDR and DDR, not something being a good combination with the Pentium 4. It was also a problem in the Nintendo 64, the latency to main memory was so high that programmers often had to stream data directly from the ROM because it was orders of magnitude faster.

    As for the availability of CRIMM terminator modules, you can still get them pretty easily on Ebay. I did a search a few minutes ago and found around 100 listings for CRIMMs.

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    What's not to like about RDRAM? High latency, runs hot and is expensive.

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