Image Map Image Map
Page 5 of 18 FirstFirst 12345678915 ... LastLast
Results 41 to 50 of 178

Thread: Why the bleep is eBay so expensive??

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    8,228
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    More collectors and less stuff to buy so prices rise.

    The key to a cheap hobby is to collect stuff nobody else wants.

    I was lucky enough to find freecycle back when old computers were literally junk, picked up some stuff on ebay when shipping was cheap and most sellers viewed it as a garage sale and not a money making venture. And I was lucky enough to snag items other collectors wanted gone, stuff that was not worth shipping, and a local recycler who let me buy whatever I wanted at a 2-3x scrap prices.

    These days shipping is expensive, people make a living off of ebay, freecycle is pretty much dead, and most collectors have a long list of people wanting their gear for $$$ (I get PM all the time on forums from people looking to buy something I mentioned in the forum). Also sadly the local recycler went bust which is probably a good thing since I have no room for more machines anyway.

    Then you have scrappers who recycled whole generations of machines.

    So all this talk about why are prices going up is kind of puzzling for me. Even during my weekly trips to the recycler a decade ago most of what was there were P2/P3 machines and they tried to refurb anything P4 and newer. You have to go back 20 years to find cheap Amiga equipment.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    Connecticut, USA
    Posts
    3,498

    Default

    It comes in Waves guys. I liked old hardware even in the 80's (we were poor I could only get older stuff) and into the 1990's. I had no idea this would become a "thing" none of us did. And youd be crazy to think that this wont plateau and crash. Do you really thinks 5 year olds today will give a rats ass about an apple II or Commodore 64 (or anything in that genre or older) when they get old enough to have interests in hobbies? This dies with us for the most part..... I'm being buried with my horde in a sunken shipping crate. Noone gets my stash!

  3. #43

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VERAULT View Post
    It comes in Waves guys. I liked old hardware even in the 80's (we were poor I could only get older stuff) and into the 1990's. I had no idea this would become a "thing" none of us did. And youd be crazy to think that this wont plateau and crash. Do you really thinks 5 year olds today will give a rats ass about an apple II or Commodore 64 (or anything in that genre or older) when they get old enough to have interests in hobbies? This dies with us for the most part..... I'm being buried with my horde in a sunken shipping crate. Noone gets my stash!
    Some will and some won't. Look at some other hobbies for examples. There are actually more 1932 Fords on the roads today than Henry made in 1932. Which is kind of amazing when you take into account how many were collected and melted down in WWII scrap drives. How can that be? The demand for originals outpaced the supply enough to create and nurture a thriving "repop" industry.

    https://brookvilleroadster.com/

    Another company was doing so well restoring Ford Broncos that Ford has brought a modernized version back into production.

    But I'm sorry to break to to you 1960 Mercury fans. There ain't a whole lot of love going around for the ugliest car ever made this side of France.

    Bottom line? If you have an Altair or an IMSAI 8080, hang on to them. Ditto for just about anything DEC. Some things are already selling for more than they did new, and the prices are not likely to be dropping any time soon if ever.
    "It's all bits on the bus, Cowboy! It's all bits on the bus!" -- Tom Beck, #1ESS Instructor, Southern Bell Opa Locka Training Center

  4. #44

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charnitz View Post
    I wonder about this regarding technology in our time. It's really hard to imagine that anyone will want <something on your desk that is not vintage> in 20-40 years, but since we do for things that were produced 20-40 years ago, will they? Maybe an interesting discussion for another thread?
    The thing, to me, about the mid-range stuff, is that it's spectacularly uninteresting.

    It's uninteresting because it's not changing much. Throughout the late 70s, 80s, and even early 90s, we were all on the rising tide that lifts all boats. Moore's law was in full swing and had dramatic impact on day to day activity. "You mean I have the memory and CPU for free, on the fly spell checking now?".

    But then, PC's plateaued. They've been "fast enough" for the longest time.

    Manufacturing got more sophisticated, for sure. There's still some exotic hardware to a point, but in the end, it all feels the same.

    The Unix workstation market vanished, replaced with PCs running Linux or modern Macs. The server marketplace is all Linux based, unless you're into IBM. And even if you did get something like some Power gear, or even Itanium, you're still looking at a $ shell prompt, just like everything else. So, it doesn't feel different, doesn't do anything different.

    Operating systems have homogenized. We've been running the same Word Processor for 20 years, the only real growth is in GPUs and video games. Interesting for some, perhaps. But most of those continue to work on modern hardware.

    So, this middle range is all just gray mush. A blur.

    It will vanish in the history of disinterest, since we can still do everything they did, today on current hardware. So, what's the point of sucking up all the space and taking all the time.

    Apple has the new Apple Silicon hardware. Actually kind of exciting, but when all you see is MacOS, like any other Mac...it gets less interesting.

    Shell prompt. Yay. I can spool up a 100 of those in the Cloud with a mouse click.

  5. #45

    Default

    People in their 30s and 40s often start to have nostalgia for their youth. That's why '50s and '60s music became so popular again in the 1980s, and Disco had a comeback in the '90s. And now people in that age bracket are the ones who grew up with '90s PCs that were considered worthless e-waste not too long ago.

    Good news for people like me who never threw any of it away -- bad news for people who did, or never had it to begin with, and now want to buy it.

  6. #46

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whartung View Post
    But then, PC's plateaued. They've been "fast enough" for the longest time
    ...
    Operating systems have homogenized. We've been running the same Word Processor for 20 years, the only real growth is in GPUs and video games. Interesting for some, perhaps. But most of those continue to work on modern hardware.
    In terms of professional software, is it only 20 years, or is there really anything other than video and multi-track audio editing that couldn't have been done in 1989? I'm finding that the professional software of that time is extremely well-polished and, in some ways, more capable than what we have now, in terms of actually getting the work done and information communicated if it was text, numbers, and illustrations.

    When you think of it that way, are the eBay prices that high, or is getting a nice vintage machine (where the seller is actually selling an excellent quality preservation or restoration at a premium) actually a bargain over today's $1000+, usually $2000+ once you upgrade a few things, new machines with bloated software, no manuals, constant updates and reboots, and no end user serviceability?

  7. #47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by charnitz View Post
    When you think of it that way, are the eBay prices that high, or is getting a nice vintage machine (where the seller is actually selling an excellent quality preservation or restoration at a premium) actually a bargain over today's $1000+, usually $2000+ once you upgrade a few things, new machines with bloated software, no manuals, constant updates and reboots, and no end user serviceability?
    I shudder to think that some eBay asking prices I am seeing are justified. There is one that I have my eye on that is a beautiful, unique aesthetic, but I can’t justify the sale price plus shipping for what they say is sold-as-parts-only since they can’t/won’t get it working.
    Sattinger’s Law: “It works better if you plug it in.” 🤯 Corollary: “It works even better if you plug it in correctly.” 🤯🤯
    "The simplest solution is the most likely solution." --My paraphrase of Occam's Razor
    "You can get [a computer] like yours at a garage sale for, like, fifteen dollars," --Strong Sad, sbemail #33

  8. #48
    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Ohio/USA
    Posts
    8,228
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill-kun View Post
    I shudder to think that some eBay asking prices I am seeing are justified. There is one that I have my eye on that is a beautiful, unique aesthetic, but I can’t justify the sale price plus shipping for what they say is sold-as-parts-only since they can’t/won’t get it working.
    People sell things as for parts because they can refuse returns and refunds. Once items get into the 100's of dollars just for the parts people will buy whole machines just to swap parts out and get a refund. Also some people don't know how to test something made before Windows or don't want to fry something worth serious money (to them).

    Only collectors know the difference between rare and common for specific era machines, sellers tend to find something that looks close and price it around what others are pricing things for.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

  9. #49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whartung View Post
    The thing, to me, about the mid-range stuff, is that it's spectacularly uninteresting.

    It's uninteresting because it's not changing much. Throughout the late 70s, 80s, and even early 90s, we were all on the rising tide that lifts all boats. Moore's law was in full swing and had dramatic impact on day to day activity. "You mean I have the memory and CPU for free, on the fly spell checking now?".

    But then, PC's plateaued. They've been "fast enough" for the longest time.

    Manufacturing got more sophisticated, for sure. There's still some exotic hardware to a point, but in the end, it all feels the same.....
    While all of this is certainly true, I think a time machine ride back to something like 1995 or 2000 would reveal users thinking the same kind of thing - that all they were seeing coming onto the market were new versions of the same thing that could go a bit faster, do a bit more, but were largely the same as the model(s) before. The problem really is that even by then, all the new markets for the use of these systems had happened - with the possible exception of video editing and the internet.

    It is what we use systems for that marks how they will be remembered, and it really isn't until the dust has settled a bit on history that it becomes a little more than merely what version of Word we had, or which flavour of Windows.

    Admittedly, I am speaking as a user of vintage systems, but the reason I value them so much is that they didn't have the power or resources to support all the bloat and garbage we habitually deal with today, the always-on interfaces providing constant demands for attention. Yet, I'd bet that whatever the systems that people will be using in another 20, 30 or even 50 years, they'll look back on what we have now and be curious to know why these systems were used, and want to try them out for themselves.

    Nostalgia. It'll look cool then, once people have something a lot worse than Windows 10 to contend with in their systems every day!

  10. #50

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyO View Post
    Nostalgia. It'll look cool then, once people have something a lot worse than Windows 10 to contend with in their systems every day!
    Worse than Windows 10? Eww! Just Eww!
    "It's all bits on the bus, Cowboy! It's all bits on the bus!" -- Tom Beck, #1ESS Instructor, Southern Bell Opa Locka Training Center

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •