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Thread: Transferring files from pc to a 5.25 disk

  1. #1

    Default Transferring files from pc to a 5.25 disk

    Hi. I was wondering if there is a program which will write c64 files to a 5.25 disk from a pc. I have a 5.25 drive hooked up to a pc,but my problem is that I can't find a program which will write the files to a 5.25 drive using the commodore 64 file format. I then would like to use the 5.25 disk in my c64.

  2. #2

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    How about accessing your 1541 drive hooked up to the PC? I see listings on ebay for "XE1541/XM1541" cables all the time. You hook up the cable to the parallel port on your PC and the other end to your Commodore 1541 drive. Pick out the right kind of software (here's a dos one http://www.funet.fi/pub/cbm/transfer...o-PC/x1541.zip)
    and you can read/write files directly to the 1541 drive.

    Geez, I should buy one of those cables myself!

  3. #3

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    Hi. Thanks for the suggestion. I was seeing if there was a way I could do it without having to buy anything,is that possible? Also,looking at that cable,it looks like just a parallel cable mated with a 6 pin DIN cable. Would it be possible to just solder those two cables together?
    That way,I wouldn't need to spend any more money.

    Also,I tried running an old c64 math disk I found. The drive makes a clicking noise like a machine gun and then an error comes up. I've heard this is a symptom of drive head misalignment,and that it's very common on 1541 drives,which is what I have. I'm kind of worried about that because I just got this drive. Does the 1541 drive always make that sound,or is it just if the heads are misaligned? Sorry about the long post.

  4. #4

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    Download and unzip the URL I gave you. It has the cable diagram in the "doc" file. The "chatter" is normal if it doesn't recognize the disk format. I can get that routinely by sticking a DOS floppy or unformatted floppy into the 1541 drive.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for the link. I think I will try to make my own cable and then use that program. What type of 5.25 disk do I need to make it readable on the 1541?

  6. #6

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    Hi,
    The Catweasel supports C64/1541 formatted disks on the PC. You may want to look into it as it does not require attaching a 1541 drive. There is software for Linux available to decode them.

    http://unusedino.de/cw/

    Thanks

    Andrew Lynch

  7. #7

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    As far as diskettes for the 1541, I go with "normal, not too hard to find DS,DD" ones. There is even a fellow Commodore person in Las Vegas that formats them and punches out the other side so you can flip them. I usually buy some from him. Here lately I have been grabbing those and using them in other types of machines too, like a Kaypro.
    Last edited by chuckcmagee; August 25th, 2007 at 08:45 AM.

  8. #8

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    Hi. Thanks for pointing out Catweasel,but it looks like I need seperate hardware for that. I'm glad to hear I can use DS DD disks because I have a bunch of those. I think the easiest and cheapest route would be to make my own x1541 cable because I have the cables already that are needed to make it.

  9. #9
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    Default

    Yes, the X-series cables consist of a DB25, a DIN6, some length of cable and at least four diodes, or resistors if you're going for an more advanced version. There is special software like Star Commander (DOS) or cbm4win (Windows XP) to use the cable.

    See this site for all details: http://sta.c64.org

    As Lynchaj pointed out, a CatWeasel controller would be a completely different way to do it. More expensive, requires a free PCI slot but also with much more hardware support (other disk formats, digital joysticks, SID chip) than a X-cable has to offer.

    Theoretically, there may exist software that lets you read a 1541 floppy in a regular 5.25" PC drive as well, but it probably will take many tries to get all bytes right. Writing to a floppy is even more difficult, if at all possible with default disk controllers.
    Anders Carlsson

  10. Default

    Actually, the 1541 was single sided. Some Commodore users used to notch out the disks, flip em over and write stuff on the other side for less important things.

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