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Floppy drive prices on eBay...

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    #16
    Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Aren't most parallel port CD ROMs just IDE units connected to a port replicator?
    In the case of the 4X backpack drives I have yes. Other manufacturers/models I'm not sure.

    I have a CR-563-B Creative drive in external enclosure that uses a dedicated Sound Blaster card with a honkin' 62pin external cable. I believe that uses the panasonic interface.

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
      It's a bathtub curve sort of thing. In the beginning, you pay through the teeth for the new devices. Then they become common and the price drops precipitously. Finally, they're not made any more and the prices increase as the supply dries up.
      Yup, and the majority of what hits the recyclers is the bottom of that curve. I think these days the supply dries up before there is any demand for items because they start out cheaper and get recycled faster.
      What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
      Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
      Boxed apps and games for the above systems
      Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

      Comment


        #18
        Originally posted by kc8eyt View Post

        I actually get those fairly inexpensive. The secret is to buy in pieces. Just two weeks ago I purchased a 164550 (4x) for $15, a 3ft backpack cable for $6, and an 18VAC backpack wall wart adapter for $12. $33 plus shipping and tax came to about $50. If you want NOS then yeah, I've seen those on eBay for $195 and more, definitely not worth that. Heck, $50 is a little high as well, but piecing the thing together was definitely cheaper than someone who had all the parts, or the NOS ones you see.

        I have 2 backpack CDROMs, and 2 backpack 1.44MB floppy drives now by doing this.
        That's a good tactic. I do have a Zip CD 650 (a USB model) so would I have any hope of using a USB-parallel cable or would I have better luck with one of those PCMCIA USB cards?
        Vintage computer systems and peripherals I'm currently looking for:
        IBM PS/2 Model P70, Compaq Contura 3/25, Any Toshiba Libretto laptop from the Libretto 50CT up to the 110CT, Commodore 1541 disk drive in working condition.

        Send a PM if you are interested in selling any of these items to me. Thanks!

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
          I must be rich--I've still got most of a carton of FD505s (combo 1.2+1.44) and 235HF (1.44).
          Chuck,

          Funny, I was thinking the same thing. I have dozens NOS laptop floppy drives, some in a carton and some in NOS floppy modules and perhaps even more NOS laptop CDROM drives in modules from when I bought out most of the inventory of the Chicony/Alphatop/ECS repair center's old inventory of parts. Anyone want a bare bones NOS Pentium laptop still sealed in the OEM box? I've got a couple of dozen of them too.
          Crazy old guy with a basement full of Pentium 1 laptops and parts

          Comment


            #20
            I remember that I had a Chicony "clicky" keyboard back in the day. It wasn't bad--this would be before the F11-F12 keyboard days.

            Aren't most laptops ultimately e-waste? I don't see folks upgrading the motherboards in those things--or recycling cases and power supplies.

            Comment


              #21
              Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
              I remember that I had a Chicony "clicky" keyboard back in the day. It wasn't bad--this would be before the F11-F12 keyboard days.

              Aren't most laptops ultimately e-waste? I don't see folks upgrading the motherboards in those things--or recycling cases and power supplies.
              Yes. Extremely hard if not impossible to upgrade the video and or CPU on most of those old platforms. I think the OEM's wanted it that way.

              Surely not everyone was Kung-fu fighting

              Comment


                #22
                Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                I remember that I had a Chicony "clicky" keyboard back in the day. It wasn't bad--this would be before the F11-F12 keyboard days.

                Aren't most laptops ultimately e-waste? I don't see folks upgrading the motherboards in those things--or recycling cases and power supplies.
                Just about anything electronic is e-waste. It's just a matter of time before it's turned into scrap.
                Crazy old guy with a basement full of Pentium 1 laptops and parts

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by DeltaDon View Post

                  Just about anything electronic is e-waste. It's just a matter of time before it's turned into scrap.
                  But that's the point, isn't it? Something that's scrap after two or three years is going to generate a lot more waste than something that has parts that can last 20 years.

                  Add to that is the "John Deere" factor--devices that lack any repair information and discourage repair.

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                    Something that's scrap after two or three years is going to generate a lot more waste than something that has parts that can last 20 years.
                    Only if you have the skill set and drive to maintain it for 20 years.

                    Every time I "upgraded" my PC, about the only things that survived from old to new were the floppy and, maybe, the CD ROM drive.

                    I did that folly. "I'll just get a new MB", oh it needs new memory...and and a new PS/Connector...and none of my cards fit anymore. What's SATA?

                    "Well, that's that!"

                    Path of least resistance, was to just swap out the entire kit.

                    Then you get the pleasure of forcing together ill fitting components in tight spaces with sharp edges, and finally chasing down drivers, settings, etc. to make it all work.

                    Most folks don't enjoy that experience, most folks barely grok what's going on in a working system, much less franken-building from white boxes with Chinese instructions.

                    If someone enjoys all that, more power too them. Most folks don't.

                    Or...."1-800-DELL...2 day shipping? Kthxbye!"

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Some of us still repair our own gear, including trucks, chainsaws, coffeemakers, computers, etc. Sometimes we make the original better. Call it an engineer's brain, particularly when said brain is the product of Depression-era parents. If something quits working, I want to know why.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Originally posted by whartung View Post

                        Only if you have the skill set and drive to maintain it for 20 years.
                        ...
                        No you don't have to do it yourself. There are probably people willing to do that for you, of course adding to the cost.

                        You know, computer building & repair was a fairly popular thing, certainly 20 years ago. But alot of that died, because of phones and tablets. There are certainly phone repair shops around now. Again you don't have to do that yourself.

                        But I guess, I'll be repairing my floppy drives to keep my stock going. Seems more interesting to me than a phone, where that breaks, the serviceability is much harder, and more throw away prone. Too bad.

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                          Does anyone remember what 5.25" drives sold for when they were just introduced? (e.g. Shugart SA-400) They weren't cheap then, and the same prices adjusted for inflation would seem really insane today. Bottom line is that nobody's making floppy drives of any stripe today and there are still plenty of old floppy disks around, so of course prices will increase as the supply of drives diminishes.

                          Personally, if I wasn't fussy about it, I'd contact the local electronics recycler to see if they have any drives. I'll wager that those still get tossed into the waste pile today.
                          Not that you have enough to do Chuck, but those depending on media type; 5.25 especially, might be worth saving?
                          Daniel P. Cayea - The Lyon Mountain Company - Plattsburgh, New York 12901
                          Vintage Equipment: IBM 5150 * IBM 5161 * ThinkPad 770ED
                          Modern Equipment: MacBook Pro 13 * Alienware M15R3

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                            #28
                            Oh, they're not going anywhere for the time being.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Something I said years ago and still say to today is that the older this stuff gets, the more technically involved we will have to become to keep it going. There will come a point where to keep our old floppy drives going were going to have to take them apart, and I think now that time is upon us.

                              And that's been pretty much true for all vintage computer stuff. At this point, I'm doing board level repairs instead of chucking motherboards and replacing them with something similar. I'm already finding ways to adapt modern storage to older hardware and figuring out what works and what does not. I've been looking at ways of hacking-in upgrades that the manufacturer would never allow or figure out.

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Early optical drives are another problem area. Unlike floppies, there was little commonality between them. Bits of plastic age and break and are generally not replaceable. Heaven help you if you need the laser head replaced.

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