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This forum is part of our mission to promote the preservation of vintage computers through education and outreach. (In real life we also run events and have a museum.) We encourage you to join us, participate, share your knowledge, and enjoy.

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Prized posession

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    #16
    Prized Posession

    I read the topic yesterday and gave it a lot of thought, and came up with two answers:

    a) Prized as in if I had to give up my collection and keep one thing - it would be a Commodore 64. It is just such a great little computer, and I enjoy it the most.

    b) Prized as in I am most prowd to show off to others that I have one - That would be a PET (not specific on the model except it has to be a 40 column PET). Of the computers I take to show off the PETs give me the most enjoyment from myself and others who see it. Especially the ones with the folded steel cases, the hood prop (which is on all models) sure raises an eyebrow too.

    Comment


      #17
      Re: Prized Posession

      Originally posted by joecommodore
      b) Prized as in I am most prowd to show off to others that I have one - That would be a PET (not specific on the model except it has to be a 40 column PET). Of the computers I take to show off the PETs give me the most enjoyment from myself and others who see it. Especially the ones with the folded steel cases, the hood prop (which is on all models) sure raises an eyebrow too.
      I love the old PETs as well. I have an 8032 that's in really nice shape and a 2001 with the chicklet keys that is also a sight to behold. The 2001 came with a bunch of tapes and manuals, as well, which adds to it's appeal for me.

      You're right, that hood prop is just cool!

      Erik
      The Vintage Computer and Gaming Marketplace
      The Vintage Computer

      Comment


        #18
        Re: Prized Posession

        "joecommodore" wrote in message:

        Hello Joe,

        > I read the topic yesterday and gave it a lot of thought,
        > and came up with two answers:

        > a) Prized as in if I had to give up my collection and
        > keep one thing - it would be a Commodore 64. It is
        > just such a great little computer, and I enjoy it the
        > most.

        Same could be said about me if you took Commodore
        64 out & Amstrad CPC in! Oh okay, I ramble on
        about the Jupiter Ace, but if I had to pick which
        machine out of the two it would be the Amstrad. It's
        all to do with the entainment value this machine has
        given be, as well as the memoies to go with it!

        It's really stupid to carry on like children when it comes
        to which machine is better? In my opinion were not all
        that different, different machines perhaps? But if your
        folks were the ones who brought you that machine
        then that's all it boils it down to.

        > b) Prized as in I am most prowd to show off to others
        > that I have one - That would be a PET (not specific on
        > the model except it has to be a 40 column PET). Of the
        > computers I take to show off the PETs give me the
        > most enjoyment from myself and others who see it.
        > Especially the ones with the folded steel cases, the
        > hood prop (which is on all models) sure raises an
        > eyebrow too.

        Cool!

        Cheers.
        Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

        Comment


          #19
          My favorite personal computer ...

          has to be the Tandy 1000 SX. It was my first DOS machine and all that memory and speed were so impressive when I bought it new. The Tandy 1000 SX I have now is a replacement. I got silly a few years back and sold my original. That was my main computer for about five years.

          I learned C and Pascal on that machine and some hints of Assembly.

          Now:

          My IBM PC300PL (a 400 MHz Pentium II) runs OS/2 Warp 4 and is my email and web browsing machine. The AMD K6/2 500 runs Windows 98 and is my game playing machine. And my Thinkpad 240x runs Windows 2000 and is my work horse for serious stuff.

          Still I had to most fun with the Tandy 1000 SX, and once upon a time I had a Commodore 128 that was a close second.

          Comment


            #20
            Ah, another OS/2 user/abuser. I was an early adopter - version 2.11 on a 486. Upgraded to Warp 3.0 and went all of the way to fixpak 42. It's still on my machine and I can run it, but I'm starting to forget too much.

            What state is Warp 4 in? Can you get a decent browser (Mozilla?), compilers, etc? How much of the new software being made available is ported from Linux?

            I always viewed OS/2 as a poor man's Unix. Back in 1994 on version 2.11 I had a fully pre-emptive multi-tasking OS with threads, a TCP/IP stack, X-Windows Server, telnet server, ftp server, a great C compiler, etc. It ran Windows 3.1 and DOS apps, and did it all at the same time on 20MB of RAM. Gracefully too. The hardware at the time was:

            486-66 DX/2 with 256KB cache
            20 MB RAM
            Buslogic BT445S VL Bus SCSI II card
            Fujitsu 400MB hard drive
            ATI Graphics Ultra Pro with 2MB VRAM
            1x external NEC CD-ROM
            SoundBlaster 8
            IBM 17P running 1280x1024 with 256 colors. ($1200 in 1994)

            Believe it or not, most of the system is still running today - it's my Linux firewall now!

            For a long time Linux had the same problems that OS/2 had - driver support. Linux has overcome the hurdle, and that's where I am today. I gave up on OS/2 when Win98 came out and Linux looked like it was emerging. Great OS, but a victim of circumstance ...

            Comment


              #21
              Warp 4 added speech navigation (which I typically don't use), a menu bar, and more multimedia support . It does get a lot of programs via Linux crossovers. I believe Mozilla for OS/2 is based on the Linux code set (i'm using Mozillia 1.5b ) The last public fix pack is 15 - there is a "Subscription" fix pack 16. There are also USB drivers available via the subscription package (which I didn't opt for - so no real USB support for me). Since I bought Warp 4 in 1996, it almost qualifies as vintage!

              I've deleted it from my machine from time to time, but always end up putting it back.

              Comment


                #22
                As for me, if I had to keep only one, it would be a CPC... I know, it was not the best machine technically speaking, but it offered the best price/performance ratio at the time. And what a pleasure to be able to program even when my parents were watching TV...

                As for the most proud of, it would be the Amstrad CSD (non comercial demo set for the GX) or the Enterprise 64... But I guess that you can be proud of any machine of that time since they were all original and not responding to any standard... :P
                my webpage :
                http://amstrad.cpc.free.fr

                Comment


                  #23
                  "mbbrutman"

                  >Ah, another OS/2 user/abuser. I was an
                  >early adopter - version 2.11 on a 486.
                  >Upgraded to Warp 3.0 and went all of the
                  >way to fixpak 42. It's still on my machine
                  >and I can run it, but I'm starting to forget
                  >too much.

                  >What state is Warp 4 in? Can you get a
                  >decent browser (Mozilla?), compilers, etc?
                  >How much of the new software being made
                  >available is ported from Linux?

                  What's wrote with Netscape?

                  >I always viewed OS/2 as a poor man's Unix.

                  Um? What gave you that impression?
                  I've played with both & felt they were nothing
                  alike.

                  >Back in 1994 on version 2.11 I had a fully
                  >pre-emptive multi-tasking OS with threads,
                  >a TCP/IP stack, X-Windows Server, telnet
                  >server, ftp server, a great C compiler, etc.
                  >It ran Windows 3.1 and DOS apps, and did
                  >it all at the same time on 20MB of RAM.

                  Version 2.xx of OS/2 is so confusing to me
                  because in the early stages of ver 2. OS/2
                  only handled version 3.0 of Windows.

                  X-Windows Server is a 'nix thing, isn't it?
                  So I guess I can see where you're comming
                  from with the OS/2 vs Unix thing.

                  >Gracefully too. The hardware at the time
                  >was:

                  >486-66 DX/2 with 256KB cache
                  >20 MB RAM
                  >Buslogic BT445S VL Bus SCSI II card
                  >Fujitsu 400MB hard drive
                  >ATI Graphics Ultra Pro with 2MB VRAM
                  >1x external NEC CD-ROM
                  >SoundBlaster 8
                  >IBM 17P running 1280x1024 with 256 colors.
                  >($1200 in 1994)

                  Around 1995 I belive that those machines
                  were upgradable to 52Mb (when Win95 came
                  out), well maybe it wasn't for all machines.

                  I played with OS/2 Warp (v3) on a machine
                  like that, except I didn't have 20Mb (only
                  16), a fairly large hard disk (540 I think),
                  but I really didn't boost my 486 @ 66Mhz to
                  it full potential!

                  Cheers.
                  Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                  Comment


                    #24
                    If I could have only one vintage machine it would be a Dimension 68000. That would be cheating tho, because it is actually 4 machines in one. In it's native mode it runs CP/M 68K, but with available co-processor boards can run programs designed for the Apple II, CP/M 80, and the IBM-PC. I really miss mine, but it has found a good home in the local computer museum, so I can visit it any time I feel like playing with it.

                    --T
                    Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
                    _____________________________________________

                    Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

                    Comment


                      #25
                      What's wrong with Netscape depends on the version of Netscape you are talking about. The Netscape I have on Warp is 4.7.x, and it's old enough where it doesn't display a lot of web sites correctly. It wasn't a very standards complient browser, and now that it's not current anymore people don't care if their stuff displays on it correctly anymore or not. There maybe a newer version, but I don't want the AOL branded versions. I'd rather run Mozilla.

                      I already mentioned why OS/2 was a good poor man's unix:

                      "version 2.11 I had a fully pre-emptive multi-tasking OS with threads, a TCP/IP stack, X-Windows Server, telnet server, ftp server, a great C compiler, etc"

                      That's my definition of a good Unix box - a good process model, a good TCP stack, and good compilers. It is very unix-like in the APIs - it just isn't multi-user, which is sad - that would have done a lot for it in the server market.

                      Version 2.xx of OS/2 handled version 3.x of Windows up until they added Win32 extensions. Remember the time frame - 1992 to 1994. Only Windows 3.x existed, not Win 95. And Microsoft was literally doing the API or patch of the week to Windows, which would invariably break the Win-OS/2 support in OS/2. This was dirty pool.

                      How far you could expand a 486 depended on the chipset, the motherboard, and your wallet. 16MB was a minimum for a usable OS/2 2.x machine. (Published spec was 8, but that would have been painful.) I got it to 20 by scavenging the memory out of my 386 box. Two years ago I took it to 32MB with four SIMMs I bought from eBay. To have 32MB in the box, that requires 8 sticks of 30 pin memory. (Each stick is 4MB in size.) This motherboard was bought in 1993 before the introduction of DIMMs. In theory 16MB SIMMs existed. However, at $40 per MB it was an expensive proposition.

                      Comment


                        #26
                        "Terry Yager" wrote in message:

                        > If I could have only one vintage machine
                        > it would be a Dimension 68000. That
                        > would be cheating tho, because it is
                        > actually 4 machines in one. In it's native
                        > mode it runs CP/M 68K, but with available
                        > co-processor boards can run programs
                        > designed for the Apple II, CP/M 80, and
                        > the IBM-PC. I really miss mine, but it
                        > has found a good home in the local
                        > computer museum, so I can visit it any
                        > time I feel like playing with it.

                        Oh well, I play around with other machines
                        on my IBM through emulators, so I guess
                        that's doing the same thing!

                        Even my good 'ol Amstrad has had an
                        emulator written for it, so I guess it's not
                        all bad!

                        Cheers.
                        Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                        Comment


                          #27
                          It's hard to pick a favourite from mine - the NeXT slab wins for out-and-out cool looks (and is fun to hack code on too). The Mac Classic II is just a joy to type on, and given that I spend a lot of time writing (text, not code) it's the machine I use most. The machine I have fondest memories of is the Sinclair QL - it was the first machine that I bought for myself, with my own hard-earned cash, it served me faithfully throughout my final year at college, and I learned the ins and outs of C programming on it. I hated (still hate, in fact) the unreliable microdrives and soon added a 3.5" floppy drive to the mix, but other than that it was a top machine. Much maligned at the time, to my mind unjustifiably, but you can't release it the way Sinclair did and expect it to be taken seriously I suppose
                          Looking for Xerox floppy disk images at the moment - if you\'ve got any, drop me a line *please*!

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