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So recordable media is going the way of the floppy

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    So recordable media is going the way of the floppy

    http://www.t-yuden.com/news/Pid=192_detail.html


    Taiyo Yuden/JVC are stopping recordable media production.
    What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
    Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
    Boxed apps and games for the above systems
    Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

    #2
    I'm surprised it took them so long!
    Be polite and I may let you live.

    https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...5NBVfKX5471R9U

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Unknown_K View Post
      http://www.t-yuden.com/news/Pid=192_detail.html


      Taiyo Yuden/JVC are stopping recordable media production.
      That's really too bad - TY media is considered one of the best brands on the market, and is rated 99+yrs archival storage for CDs/DVDs, as I remember. It will end up being like the audio cassette biz in a few years, and we'll play hell finding recordable CD/DVD media...

      The constant "slimming" of choices for backup and archiving, is now aiming at giving us no alternative, than to use Flash, as in cheap (soon to be) SSHD drives, or cards. The only problem with that is data retention!

      The latest #'s on retention of data on an un-powered SSHD (as in backup-remove-store on shelf mode), is <= 12 months! (according to JEDEC & INTEL - as little as 5 weeks if stored at above room temp!!!)

      I can't wait for the hue-and-cry from admins and general users, who find their 2+TB backups are garbage when they try to use them a couple of years down the line...

      gwk
      Last edited by griffk; July 22, 2015, 03:00 PM.

      Comment


        #4
        Actually, the solution is "the cloud".
        Be polite and I may let you live.

        https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...5NBVfKX5471R9U

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by KC9UDX View Post
          Actually, the solution is "the cloud".
          Ahh -- As in "head's in the ---"...

          gwk

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by griffk View Post
            The latest #'s on retention of data on an un-powered SSHD (as in backup-remove-store on shelf mode), is <= 12 months! (according to JEDEC & INTEL - as little as 5 weeks if stored at above room temp!!!)
            Don't believe every half-baked article you read.

            I have lots of flash material that I recorded 10 - 15 years ago that still accesses perfectly. It's actually shown better retention than either IDE or floppy media that I have personal control over.
            PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

            Comment


              #7
              I think its BS how people so quickly dismiss CD/DVD-R media.

              I use recordable media all the darn time for archiving large sets of data. Whenever I mention this elsewhere, I get dissed for not being "with it" or whatever, but no one offers a better solution. I'm not archiving crap like movies or porn, or whatever it is kids like to download these days. I need to be sure this data hasn't magically changed because of a virus or some crappy OS writing additional data to the wrong sectors. Yes, a copy is also kept on a hard drive. Using more hard drives as backups adds complexity for WHEN things go wrong.

              Also, until everyone has gigabit speeds (down and UP and not metered) to the internet, it is still quicker, cheaper, and easier, to mail someone a DVD-R full of data.

              Comment


                #8
                I haven't had flash failures in 10 years. I have had considerable CDR failures in 15 years. I have had a handful of hard drives die. But, I have yet to have a floppy diskette die on its own. I have some that I wrote in 1983 that are perfectly fine. I have some mass produced ones older than that.
                Be polite and I may let you live.

                https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...5NBVfKX5471R9U

                Comment


                  #9
                  9 track 1/2 tape. Proven to retain data reliably after 40 years...
                  Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by Unknown_K View Post
                    Taiyo Yuden/JVC are stopping recordable media production.
                    "The Company currently expects that the impact of this business withdrawal on its corporate earnings will be immaterial." Ouch.

                    I was really bummed when LightScribe died. LightScribe is great for quick burns of stuff to share with people, quick burns of DVDs, etc. I can still buy LS media but I don't know for how much longer.

                    BD-ROM is very economical for long-term storage, or at least facebook thinks so: http://arstechnica.com/information-t...e-data-center/
                    Offering a bounty for:
                    - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
                    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I didn't know LightScribe did die. The people behind MODisc seem to think this is good for them, less competition.

                      When I got my first CD burner media was pretty reliable but pricey $8 a piece in bulk. When I got into DVD recordable some discs didn't even pass the initial verification process. DVD burners can be found for $12 new at Newegg on sale so everybody has one, I don't have any BR players in the house so getting a burner means added expense to get at least a USB2 player.
                      What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
                      Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
                      Boxed apps and games for the above systems
                      Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by Stone View Post
                        Don't believe every half-baked article you read.

                        I have lots of flash material that I recorded 10 - 15 years ago that still accesses perfectly. It's actually shown better retention than either IDE or floppy media that I have personal control over.
                        Can't say I was talking about Flash (as in USB or card media) as much as the crap that they are putting in most SSHDs these days, for economical reasons.

                        The "articles" were actually white papers DIRECT from JEDEC and Intel, so I don't think they were knocking their own prods--just setting out specs for manufacturers and standards committees.

                        gwk

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Trixter View Post
                          "The Company currently expects that the impact of this business withdrawal on its corporate earnings will be immaterial." Ouch.

                          I was really bummed when LightScribe died. LightScribe is great for quick burns of stuff to share with people, quick burns of DVDs, etc. I can still buy LS media but I don't know for how much longer.

                          BD-ROM is very economical for long-term storage, or at least facebook thinks so: http://arstechnica.com/information-t...e-data-center/
                          I've got LS burners, but have never used it--I was given to understand that long-term stability of the LS artwork wasn't all that good.
                          Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            honestly I believe the cd & dvd's major downfall was the simplicity of usb sticks. coupled with their continued price drops. You always had to burn a cd/dvd and it was always this extra step. and if for some reason it didnt work just right, you got a coaster. If you scratched the disk, it was dead and gone. Where the usb flash drive has been the textbook definition of plug & play (since win2k at least)

                            Add in most software being a download from the internet... I'm amazed cd/dvd has lasted as long as it has.
                            It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              I don't trust the "cloud". Confidential information has a tendency to be acquired by the wrong people. Flash devices are more secure but their lifetime is still limited. M-disk is the only recognized, long-term, solution. Think of how many lost data even on magnetic cartridge media. There's no other way (other than vacuum-stored, sealed in steel, paper) if your data will be needed for generations.
                              Rick Ethridge

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