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Advice--best P4 heatsink

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  • #16
    Plastic isn't always a bad thing. It's cheap ultra mass produced plastic that's the problem I'm guessing. To go off topic a bit, the upper intake manifold on my hooptie is plastic. It carries air and coolant. It's not a matter of if but when it'll fail, and potentially hydrolocking the engine. But at 175k it's still doing it's job. Later models use aluminum. But aluminum can also fatigue and crack. Can't expect everything to be made of cast iron or steel. There's a lot of engineering in these boards. Can't expect too much.

    Comment


    • #17
      It's materials choice that is so often short sighted. I used to own a Volvo 940 turbo-brick. Great car; good mileage and lots of room, particularly if you put the rear seats down. It had two weaknesses--lead-free solder in the electronics (that could be repaired) and use of plastic everywhere. After about 20 years, the plastic just cracked and broke if you looked cross-eyed at it. At about the same time the turbo was leaking and wiring insulation was starting to develop issues. It was a matter of pouring a bunch of cash into the thing and dealing with the plastic or getting rid of it. I chose the latter.

      On the Intel heatsink assembly, the clips retaining the heatsink to the board look to be unreinforced PA6 or PDM. Said plastic does not age well when used at elevated temperatures. A couple of spring clips would have been more robust and lasted indefinitely--and probably would have been cheaper to manufacture.

      Ask any museum curator about the long-term suitability of plastics.

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      • #18
        Plastic isn't going to last forever, that's a given. But it varies in durability, longevity. Here I am staring at any number of plastic vintage puter items. Some I'm afraid to look at, as the gesture may be taken the wrong way. Other pieces, while yellowed, are as sturdy as ever. All were at least semi mass produced in injection molds. The plastics in my 98 Pontiac are holding up well. The vinyl dashboard not so well. But I've taken no steps to preserve it either. And it isn't horrible. I'm sure agents to diminish harmful uv or ir were inserted at the time of manufacture.

        I'm at least attempting to utilize items as old as your p4 board. But I would imagine if you filed a complaint w/the manufacturer regarding the putrid condition of your heatsink retention mechanism, you'd be confronted by a great deal of laughter as a best case scenario. Nothing lasts forever. Look at these bodies. Who made all that?? I want to know where to complain.

        I happen to like plastic, in some applications. It's pretty. Around 15 years ago I started collecting these Gundam plastic model kits. Oh they look so nice. I haven't assembled not 1. They just sit in boxes. Colored plastic really is beautiful. And me saying I like them belies that fact that all along my intention was to burn out the originals in lost wax molds. One of these decades.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
          Ask any museum curator about the long-term suitability of plastics.
          We know.
          Esp 20+ year old things with plastic tabs holding it together.
          We did battery mitigation before I got here, I don't want to tell
          them they have to do it for SMD electrolytics as well otherwise
          there will be zero chance of restoring things after the traces
          near them have rotted.

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
            It's materials choice that is so often short sighted. I used to own a Volvo 940 turbo-brick. Great car; good mileage and lots of room, particularly if you put the rear seats down. It had two weaknesses--lead-free solder in the electronics (that could be repaired) and use of plastic everywhere. After about 20 years, the plastic just cracked and broke if you looked cross-eyed at it. At about the same time the turbo was leaking and wiring insulation was starting to develop issues. It was a matter of pouring a bunch of cash into the thing and dealing with the plastic or getting rid of it. I chose the latter.

            On the Intel heatsink assembly, the clips retaining the heatsink to the board look to be unreinforced PA6 or PDM. Said plastic does not age well when used at elevated temperatures. A couple of spring clips would have been more robust and lasted indefinitely--and probably would have been cheaper to manufacture.

            Ask any museum curator about the long-term suitability of plastics.
            I ordered two dozen replacement clips for LGA775 era heatsinks that had broken bits off ebay for $5.55 shipped last year.

            https://www.ebay.com/itm/8Pcs-set-Fa...n/133430344418
            What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
            Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
            Boxed apps and games for the above systems
            Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

            Comment


            • #21
              Do you want to see a photo of the broken Intel heatsink parts? The only alternative is to puchase a new one--which will probably also break. As the ranks of available parts thin out, it's going to be harder to replace.

              Comment


              • #22
                Intel heatsinks are kind of crappy. The only ones I liked at all were the ones for the high end C2Q had solid copper slugs and even those are barely capable of cooling the chips they were sold with.

                Chuck you sold me a P4 board that had an interesting all copper heatsink with metal mounting I still have (board died) and am using on a different board.
                What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
                Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
                Boxed apps and games for the above systems
                Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

                Comment


                • #23
                  The "low end" aluminum lga771 Intel heatsinks were beasts. They were big. I never used the very fastest chips my old dual processor board could run. But I found if you had enough air blowing on those heatsinks, seemingly they would cool anything.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    these came in today, spotted two NOS copper ones on eBay for $12 ea

                    hs.JPG

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by Unknown_K View Post
                      Intel heatsinks are kind of crappy. The only ones I liked at all were the ones for the high end C2Q had solid copper slugs and even those are barely capable of cooling the chips they were sold with.

                      Chuck you sold me a P4 board that had an interesting all copper heatsink with metal mounting I still have (board died) and am using on a different board.
                      Kind of regretted not keeping that one, but other than the one I'm using, I have no other 478 boards. I'm predominantly AMD nowadays. Which reminds me--the footprint of a socket AM2 heatsink is darned near identical to that of a Socket 478. The big difference is in the retention bracket--Intel uses 2 clips, AMD uses one. Yet I could find no mention of using an AM2/3 cooler on a 478 machine.

                      Anent plastics: Does anyone have any first-hand experience with the long-term survival of 3D-printed PLA?

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                        Anent plastics: Does anyone have any first-hand experience with the long-term survival of 3D-printed PLA?
                        I have a pair of 6 year old PLA figured on my desk that don't seem to have degraded.
                        I printed some christmas light clips that I use each year, after 2 seasons (4 months total) in direct sunlight they began to degrade to the point of physical failure. I now only use them for 2 seasons then toss and re-print.

                        The biggest issue you would have around a heat sink design would be the material getting warm enough to deform, it really doesn't take much to make PLA soft.

                        There is a tempering process you can go through which helps physical strength and resistance to heat.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          I don't trust the low-profile ones; I'm running a 3GHz Prescott and those buggers get hot fast.

                          That Molex one is interesting , but it clearly takes a different mounting bracket. I did grab the Ultra X Wind one--it's for 478 as well as Socket 754 and is a nice big unit. It may not fit a lot of motherboards, due to the 120 mm diameter--uses a 90 mm fan.

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                          • #28
                            This is what I wound up with;

                            heatsink.jpg

                            About 6.5 inches (16.5 cm) tall; just barely fits a 4U rack case.

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I still like mine better.

                              * sits in the corner and pouts *
                              It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Yours may, in fact be better. Looking at the baseplate, this thing looks to be a Socket 423 heatsink. S'okay--I've got another big copper one on the way. Maybe someone with a 423 server wants to relieve me of this one...

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