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C2n232

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    #16
    cbmlink

    Originally posted by MikeS View Post
    4001??? I thought it was for an 8032? In which case I wouldn't mind a copy...
    Mike, the callout 'pet4001' causes cbmlink to use an 'include subdirectory' in the make file that contains the 40XX and 80XX PET families as I understand it (I'm no expert on this stuff).
    -Dave
    cbmlink software

    Comment


      #17
      Originally posted by dave_m View Post
      Mike, the callout 'pet4001' causes cbmlink to use an 'include subdirectory' in the make file that contains the 40XX and 80XX PET families as I understand it (I'm no expert on this stuff).
      I was all wrong there. The pet4001, pc64 designations were too simply help one find the right place in the directory tree to find the correct server side program (PET prg file).

      After messing around with the bcc compiler which can target DOS com files, I had to give up. Without having a Windows equivalent to the unix 'make' command, I could not use the makefile.DOS properly.

      However I found a Win32 executable in the archives (cbmlink.exe), so now my plan will be to add a PCI parallel port to my XP machine and run cbmlink from there. This is not as handy as the two machines are not in the same room, but it should work.

      Comment


        #18
        I've looked at CBMlink a few times and given up in frustration every time; there's mention of a DOS binary in several places but I've never found one.

        When I read "it is assumed that anyone using DOS would use Linux if he could" I knew this was going to be way more complicated than it needs to be...

        Guess I'm spoiled by the straightforward transfer routines for my other machines.

        mike

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by MikeS View Post
          When I read "it is assumed that anyone using DOS would use Linux if he could" I knew this was going to be way more complicated than it needs to be...
          Yes, I was puzzled by that statement also. But after hours trying to compile cbmlink using bcc and a large array in input c files, I now understand that the author was gently telling us that you will need to have a machine running linux and a full set of compiler tools to correctly generate the file.

          As to why he just didn’t include 'cbmlink.com' in his archive, I’m guessing that unix gurus think that software is so much fun that he didn’t want to cheat the rest of us from having the pleasure of compiling our own executable.

          Personally, I would rather have just grabbed the executable and proceeded with my main project of transferring some PET software.
          -Dave

          Comment


            #20
            Originally posted by dave_m View Post
            Yes, I was puzzled by that statement also. But after hours trying to compile cbmlink using bcc and a large array in input c files, I now understand that the author was gently telling us that you will need to have a machine running linux and a full set of compiler tools to correctly generate the file.

            As to why he just didn’t include 'cbmlink.com' in his archive, I’m guessing that unix gurus think that software is so much fun that he didn’t want to cheat the rest of us from having the pleasure of compiling our own executable.

            Personally, I would rather have just grabbed the executable and proceeded with my main project of transferring some PET software.
            -Dave
            Don't get me started on these folks who insist that just plugging in a tool to do a job is not 'real' computing, and that everyone needs to know how to compile from source, where to find the tools and sift through the many revisions etc., and finally be able to figure out why it won't compile which is usually the case...

            Comment


              #21
              Some user notes on cbmlink

              OK, with the windows version of cbmlink, I got it to communicate successfully with my PET using the pc64 cable between the PET User Port and the parallel port of the PC. The instructions were a bit incomplete but one can fill in the gaps easily enough. The author is Finnish so it is understandable that writing a ‘bullet proof’ technical instruction in English might be fairly difficult. But his code is great.

              Here are my notes on using cbmlink on a PC running Windows 98 and a PET 8032. Perhaps this will be useful as a supplement to the author’s instructions. See link below for authors' instructions.

              cbmlink release notes for parallel cables

              There is a neat way provided to transfer the server software into the PET. One types-in a short loader in BASIC. When run, it waits patiently for a load command on the user port. On the PC, in a DOS window, one changes to the subdirectory where the cbmlink program (cmblink.exe) and the files to be transferred are located, and enters the command line:
              cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –l plain.prg

              This is for the pc64 cable protocol, and the LPT1 port and the proper server program to be loaded for your computer/configuration from the cbmlink-cbmprg.zip file. The instructions say that you can use port numbers like 0,1,2 or 3 but this did not work for me. The instruction also had an example of 0x3bc for LPT1 but that may be a typo. Perhaps they are for Windows XP.

              Every once in a while I can get an error after executing a command that says something like no such protocol as pc45 even though I entered pc64. No matter. Just repeat the command.

              This first server program is fixed to run at memory location $7C00. It is started with a sys 31744. Then one can transfer the re-locatable version if wanted from the cbmlink-cbmbasic.zip file. I needed that version as I will be transferring machine language code that will reside in the $7000 block of RAM, so I transferred the re-locatable one next. It then says to perform a SAVE of the transferred file. But it will not save correctly in BASIC. I had to go to the Machine Language Monitor (sys 1024) and determine the size of the ML program and perform the save there:

              .s ”name”, 01,0401,0930 to save the re-locatable server on cassette.
              .s “name1”,01,7C00,7D9F to save the fixed address server on casstte.

              Another issue with the re-locatable version was that after you load it but before you run it, you are to change the second line of the BASIC portion of the program to point to the desired starting address. But the instructions are somewhat vague about telling you to delete the default second line that is there. If you do not, when run, the program hits a 00H ‘break instruction’ and lands in the monitor program.

              A few times when it was run, the server software would immediately hang the PET. But it always seems to work the next time after a hard reset or power cycle. Nothing’s perfect in life.

              One other thing that is important to remember is that just before or after the server is installed, say at $7C00, one must reset the top of BASIC so that the server code will not be stepped on later on if other programs are to be run. This is done in BASIC 4 with:
              POKE 53, 124 : POKE 52,0 : new : REM sets top of BASIC to $7C00

              The last thing to remember is that the addresses used in cbmlink default to decimal. So to SAVE a ML program located at $7000 to $7FFF in the PET, one uses the command:
              cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –s,28672,32768 name.prg
              Or you can explicitly reference hex:
              cbmlink –c pc64 0x378 –s,0x7000,0x8000 name.prg

              I transferred several 4K test files with test patterns to see if the data arrived correctly and it seems fine. Overall, it looks like a very good way to transfer files between the PET and a PC.
              Last edited by dave_m; October 13, 2009, 10:50 AM. Reason: typos

              Comment


                #22
                Thanks for reporting Dave. That's useful stuff.

                Tez
                ------------------------------------------------
                My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
                My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
                Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)

                Comment


                  #23
                  Nice write-up, Dave.

                  Which version of Windows did you use? I remember that at least in XP you can't normally address the parallel port directly from userspace. I'm not sure this is an issue for cbmlink, but there are tools to "fix" this if it is.

                  I don't remember the type-in program being all that short when I last tried it. There are some programs which can supposedly translate BASIC code in ASCII into a .PRG, but I never got any of them to work. However, copy-pasting the code into VICE does work! I saved the result to a virtual tape and used audiotap to make a real one which loaded perfectly on my PET.
                  Steve Maddison
                  Digital, Sinclair, Commodore, homebrew Z80 and other stuff...

                  Comment


                    #24
                    Originally posted by cosam View Post
                    Which version of Windows did you use? I remember that at least in XP you can't normally address the parallel port directly from userspace. I'm not sure this is an issue for cbmlink, but there are tools to "fix" this if it is.
                    Very good point. I used Windows98 on an old computer. I'll update the writeup to mention it.

                    Originally posted by cosam View Post
                    However, copy-pasting the code into VICE does work! I saved the result to a virtual tape and used audiotap to make a real one which loaded perfectly on my PET.
                    Nice, very clever.
                    -Dave

                    Comment


                      #25
                      Who is this fellow with the assembled C2N232s?

                      Hello all,

                      I was hoping Anders would post contact information or some such for that guy he mentioned (on page one of this thread) who had preassembled C2N232 units. Does anyone know if he still has any available? I’d _really_ like one, but I have no means of soldering very small connections, so I can’t assemble one myself.

                      G.
                      the world’s only gsteemso
                      agitator-in-chief for the Seattle Retro-Computing Society

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Sorry, I have forgotten. Anyway the person I was going to contact will only sell the adapter in kit form. You would need to do the SMD soldering yourself, or find someone to do it for you. This is due to relatively new laws/regulations within the European Union which makes it very hard and expensive for someone to sell ready-made electronics devices. Kits you assemble yourself does not (yet) fall under the same regulations.
                        Anders Carlsson

                        Comment


                          #27
                          Where can I buy a C2N232 adapter?

                          Hi. Where can I buy a C2N232 adapter?

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Oh.. time flies and I still haven't asked. Upon a closer look, the C2N232I is mentioned on his own homepage so I could just as well post a link to Nicolas page:
                            http://www.x1541.de/

                            Please note those adapters most likely would be sold in kit form and require SMD abilities to be assembled. Possibly there is someone elsewhere who would be willing to assemble a number of those, but I don't know.
                            Anders Carlsson

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by carlsson View Post
                              This is due to relatively new laws/regulations within the European Union which makes it very hard and expensive for someone to sell ready-made electronics devices. Kits you assemble yourself does not (yet) fall under the same regulations.
                              Anders,
                              Is this due to the very strict regulations/certifications about using lead free solder in electronics? Or is there some other reason like product safety, etc?
                              -Dave

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I think it all boils down to that the manufacturer is required to pay for and handle recycled products. You need to apply for a license which may even cost a lot of money to be a qualified producer and seller of electronics, but I haven't studied it further in detail.
                                Anders Carlsson

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