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CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

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    CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

    I am tinkering with running CP/M on a 8088 machine. Why you ask? Why not!

    I think it would be interesting to have CP/M running on a handheld like the HP 100, or any of the Poqet palmtops, or heck, even the Atari Portfolio!

    Anybody have any experience here?

    I'm currently running 22nice and it seems pretty good. Was trying MyZ80, but it needs a '286 or better.

    BTW, I contacted Sydex about 22nice and registering it and they'd still be willing to sell me a license for 22nice and 22Disk for $100. Of course, there is NO support for 22nice.

    Curtis
    Outside a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog it's too dark to read! Groucho Marx

    Curtis McCain

    http://pages.suddenlink.net/curtismc/

    #2
    Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

    Originally posted by curtis
    BTW, I contacted Sydex about 22nice and registering it and they'd still be willing to sell me a license for 22nice and 22Disk for $100. Of course, there is NO support for 22nice.

    Curtis
    I have a few of their products, some of which are no longer available, others are equally high-priced. I'm sure they'd like a bunch of my money but I'd rather not use their products.

    Comment


      #3
      Yeah, $100 seemed quite steep to me.

      Their reasoning was that since 22disk costs corporate customers $150, they would "cut me a deal" of $100 seeing I'm just a hobbiest and toss in 22nice for nothing.

      What would I get for my $100? Licenses for 2 pieces of software that work just fine without the license. Hmmm.

      Is there anything that even remotely hints at I just fell off a turnip truck?

      curtis
      Outside a dog, a book is a man's best friend. Inside a dog it's too dark to read! Groucho Marx

      Curtis McCain

      http://pages.suddenlink.net/curtismc/

      Comment


        #4
        Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

        Originally posted by curtis
        I am tinkering with running CP/M on a 8088 machine.
        I always thought one of the "points" of the 8086/8088 was that it was going to be trivial to get 8080/8085 programs running. Noone did this for CP/M?

        Comment


          #5
          Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

          Originally posted by kjs3
          Originally posted by curtis
          I am tinkering with running CP/M on a 8088 machine.
          I always thought one of the "points" of the 8086/8088 was that it was going to be trivial to get 8080/8085 programs running. Noone did this for CP/M?
          I've heard of emulators that run on the NEC V-20, but I've never seen one in captivity.

          The thing I don't understand is why nobody ever ported CP/M to the TRS-80 Model 100, (I8085) as popular as those systems were.

          --T
          Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
          _____________________________________________

          Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

          Comment


            #6
            Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

            "Terry Yager" wrote:

            >> I am tinkering with running CP/M on a 8088 machine.

            >> I always thought one of the "points" of the 8086/8088
            >> was that it was going to be trivial to get 8080/8085
            >> programs running. Noone did this for CP/M?

            > I've heard of emulators that run on the NEC V-20, but
            > I've never seen one in captivity.

            Then you've never been to the CP/M-86 Software
            Repository: http://www.seanet.com/~klaw/ there's a
            program there which uses this NEC V20 chip. The
            emulator is better than any ordinary emulator, because
            of the access it has to this chip!

            Cheers,
            CP/M User.
            Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

            Comment


              #7
              I guess I haven't seen it because I haven't looked real hard. I don't have a V-20 to run it on anyways, but I'd like to try it out someday.

              --T
              Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
              _____________________________________________

              Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

              Comment


                #8
                "Terry Yager" wrote:

                > I guess I haven't seen it because I
                > haven't looked real hard. I don't
                > have a V-20 to run it on anyways,
                > but I'd like to try it out someday.

                I was under the impression that
                somebody else wanted the 8080
                support on their IBM. Course you'd
                need the V-20 processor, how does
                that work, does it fit onto the
                Motherboard, or is it a card in itself?

                I've seen other expansion cards
                which offered Z80/8080 support,
                but to track one down would be
                hard. These are the ones which
                were build when the IBM lacked
                software & so they went to a
                popular processor which had
                support for lots of software. Z80
                was one, since it supports 8080
                in itself.

                The emulator which uses the V20
                processor at the CP/M-86
                software repository is also on a
                number of other websites as well
                (IIRC). I'm not sure if it's
                PC-BLUE, SIG/M or COMUG which
                has it, or if it's on a FTP site which
                has CP/M stuff on.

                Cheers,
                CP/M User.
                Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by CP/M User

                  I was under the impression that
                  somebody else wanted the 8080
                  support on their IBM. Course you'd
                  need the V-20 processor, how does
                  that work, does it fit onto the
                  Motherboard, or is it a card in itself?
                  The V-20 is a pin-for-pin compatable drop-in replacement for the 8088. The chip is faster than the 8088,(at the same clock speed) as well as being backward-compatable with the 8080. (It supports the full 8080 instruction set natively, rather than translating the instructions on-the-fly like the 8088 has to do).
                  I've seen other expansion cards
                  which offered Z80/8080 support,
                  but to track one down would be
                  hard. These are the ones which
                  were build when the IBM lacked
                  software & so they went to a
                  popular processor which had
                  support for lots of software. Z80
                  was one, since it supports 8080
                  in itself.
                  There are several different varieties of Z-80 boards for the IBM-PC, but they all work pretty much the same way. They are actually miniture Z-80 computers on a board. They have, besides the Z-80, thier own memory space and I/O, but use the IBM I/O channel to access peripherals. The one I used to have was the Blue Thunder, a 64Kb version. Another popular one at the time was the Baby Blue card. These are generally faster than a pure software emulation because, again, no translation of the opcodes is necessary, they run natively on the Z-80.
                  The emulator which uses the V20
                  processor at the CP/M-86
                  software repository is also on a
                  number of other websites as well
                  (IIRC). I'm not sure if it's
                  PC-BLUE, SIG/M or COMUG which
                  has it, or if it's on a FTP site which
                  has CP/M stuff on.

                  Cheers,
                  CP/M User.
                  Yeah, there's probably a copy of it on the CP/M CD too, but I'll have to check on that one.

                  --T
                  Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
                  _____________________________________________

                  Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    "Terry Yager" wrote:

                    > Yeah, there's probably a copy of it on the CP/M CD
                    > too, but I'll have to check on that one.

                    Yeah, there probably is on that the CD. Half the fun
                    would be trying to find the darn thing, or just do a
                    google advanced search on Genes website (which
                    has the CD) with the approrate keyword!

                    Cheers,
                    CP/M User.
                    Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

                      Originally posted by curtis
                      I am tinkering with running CP/M on a 8088 machine. Why you ask? Why not!

                      I think it would be interesting to have CP/M running on a handheld like the HP 100, or any of the Poqet palmtops, or heck, even the Atari Portfolio!

                      Anybody have any experience here?

                      I'm currently running 22nice and it seems pretty good. Was trying MyZ80, but it needs a '286 or better.

                      Curtis
                      Nothing like reviving an ol' dead thread...

                      I was looking for another old post last night and came across this one instead. I thought HHMMMMNN...why not? So, I loaded 22NICE onto my Poqet PC, and thought I'd comment on it. The emulator itself seems to run admirably well, but other programs may be a little iffy. So far, I have only tried it with two programs, WordStar 3.3 & MBASIC. The programs under MBASIC seem to run out just fine. As far as I can remember running them on an actual floppy-based CP/M machine, program execution speed is about normal. WordStar, OTOH, is running so s-l-o-w as to be completely un-usable. It takes over 30 seconds to paint a single line of text on the screen. It did seem to work as normal, except for the speed. All the commands I gave it were executed (eventually) as usual.
                      I guess I'll experiment around some more with it tonight, and see what other software I can find that works. If anyone has any specific suggestions you'd like me to try out, I'll give it a go.
                      BTW, I was unable to run the emulator from my SRAM card because it was too small to hold the emulator and the WS files at the same time. My SRAM is only 512Kb. Luckily, I do have the external floppy drive, and all programs will fit on those 1.44Mb floppies, so it worked out just fine. (I'm in the market for a couple of <CHEAP> Type I PCMCIA SRAM cards in the 2-4Mb range, if anyone has any). The Poqet PC has not satisfied my desire for a truly portable CP/M machine, but it's better than nothing. (BTW, curtis, I'm still loving my PX-8, but lack of sufficient mass-storage is still a problem). Mebbe the Poqet will work out better after I find some larger-capacity memory cards for it.

                      --T

                      Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
                      _____________________________________________

                      Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Re: CP/M Emulator on a 8088 class machine

                        "Terry Yager" wrote:

                        > http://pws.chartermi.net/~tyger69/de...m/wordstar.jpg

                        Yo dude, how bigs that picture you've posted, it seems to be taking
                        forever to display itself on my computer. What sort of Resolution is
                        that in?

                        Cheers,
                        CP/M User.
                        Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                        Comment


                          #13
                          UUUmmm...I think it's sum'n like 700 x 4-sum'n. What kinda computer are ya viewing it on?

                          --T
                          Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
                          _____________________________________________

                          Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            "Terry Yager" Wrote:

                            > UUUmmm...I think it's sum'n like 700 x 4-sum'n.
                            > What kinda computer are ya viewing it on?

                            Pentium I class computer! Usually anything bigger than
                            640x480 starts to run into performance problems.

                            Cheers,
                            CP/M User.
                            Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                            Comment


                              #15
                              OK, I re-sized it a little. Now it's at 640 x 427. Lemme know if it's still a problem. (I'd like to make sure my vintage computer pics are viewable on vintage computers).

                              --T
                              Teach your children how to think, not what, and hold 'em close, not tight.
                              _____________________________________________

                              Please visit the Vintage-Computer Wiki. Contributers welcome.

                              Comment

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