Announcement

Collapse

Forum Rules and Etiquette

Our mission ...

This forum is part of our mission to promote the preservation of vintage computers through education and outreach. (In real life we also run events and have a museum.) We encourage you to join us, participate, share your knowledge, and enjoy.

This forum has been around in this format for over 15 years. These rules and guidelines help us maintain a healthy and active community, and we moderate the forum to keep things on track. Please familiarize yourself with these rules and guidelines.


Rule 1: Remain civil and respectful

There are several hundred people who actively participate here. People come from all different backgrounds and will have different ways of seeing things. You will not agree with everything you read here. Back-and-forth discussions are fine but do not cross the line into rude or disrespectful behavior.

Conduct yourself as you would at any other place where people come together in person to discuss their hobby. If you wouldn't say something to somebody in person, then you probably should not be writing it here.

This should be obvious but, just in case: profanity, threats, slurs against any group (sexual, racial, gender, etc.) will not be tolerated.


Rule 2: Stay close to the original topic being discussed
  • If you are starting a new thread choose a reasonable sub-forum to start your thread. (If you choose incorrectly don't worry, we can fix that.)
  • If you are responding to a thread, stay on topic - the original poster was trying to achieve something. You can always start a new thread instead of potentially "hijacking" an existing thread.



Rule 3: Contribute something meaningful

To put things in engineering terms, we value a high signal to noise ratio. Coming here should not be a waste of time.
  • This is not a chat room. If you are taking less than 30 seconds to make a post then you are probably doing something wrong. A post should be on topic, clear, and contribute something meaningful to the discussion. If people read your posts and feel that their time as been wasted, they will stop reading your posts. Worse yet, they will stop visiting and we'll lose their experience and contributions.
  • Do not bump threads.
  • Do not "necro-post" unless you are following up to a specific person on a specific thread. And even then, that person may have moved on. Just start a new thread for your related topic.
  • Use the Private Message system for posts that are targeted at a specific person.


Rule 4: "PM Sent!" messages (or, how to use the Private Message system)

This forum has a private message feature that we want people to use for messages that are not of general interest to other members.

In short, if you are going to reply to a thread and that reply is targeted to a specific individual and not of interest to anybody else (either now or in the future) then send a private message instead.

Here are some obvious examples of when you should not reply to a thread and use the PM system instead:
  • "PM Sent!": Do not tell the rest of us that you sent a PM ... the forum software will tell the other person that they have a PM waiting.
  • "How much is shipping to ....": This is a very specific and directed question that is not of interest to anybody else.


Why do we have this policy? Sending a "PM Sent!" type message basically wastes everybody else's time by making them having to scroll past a post in a thread that looks to be updated, when the update is not meaningful. And the person you are sending the PM to will be notified by the forum software that they have a message waiting for them. Look up at the top near the right edge where it says 'Notifications' ... if you have a PM waiting, it will tell you there.

Rule 5: Copyright and other legal issues

We are here to discuss vintage computing, so discussing software, books, and other intellectual property that is on-topic is fine. We don't want people using these forums to discuss or enable copyright violations or other things that are against the law; whether you agree with the law or not is irrelevant. Do not use our resources for something that is legally or morally questionable.

Our discussions here generally fall under "fair use." Telling people how to pirate a software title is an example of something that is not allowable here.


Reporting problematic posts

If you see spam, a wildly off-topic post, or something abusive or illegal please report the thread by clicking on the "Report Post" icon. (It looks like an exclamation point in a triangle and it is available under every post.) This send a notification to all of the moderators, so somebody will see it and deal with it.

If you are unsure you may consider sending a private message to a moderator instead.


New user moderation

New users are directly moderated so that we can weed spammers out early. This means that for your first 10 posts you will have some delay before they are seen. We understand this can be disruptive to the flow of conversation and we try to keep up with our new user moderation duties to avoid undue inconvenience. Please do not make duplicate posts, extra posts to bump your post count, or ask the moderators to expedite this process; 10 moderated posts will go by quickly.

New users also have a smaller personal message inbox limit and are rate limited when sending PMs to other users.


Other suggestions
  • Use Google, books, or other definitive sources. There is a lot of information out there.
  • Don't make people guess at what you are trying to say; we are not mind readers. Be clear and concise.
  • Spelling and grammar are not rated, but they do make a post easier to read.
See more
See less

Any way to replace 5160/5161 power supply?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    #16
    On late model 5160s, IBM got their PSUs from a number of sources. I've seen the security Torx screws on the 4869 external floppy boxes as well.

    Sometimes "tamper-proof" doesn't mean beans, however. Last week I re-LED-ed a bunch of night lights (white LEDs to decrease in brightness as they age--and I'm cheap). All were buttoned up using tri-wing "tamper proof" screws and all could be unscrewed using a plain flat-blade screwdriver.
    Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

    Comment


      #17
      My 5150 and all my 5160 power supplies had at least one of those security screws.
      I also find them in Compaq all the time, so generally have the piece ready to go. Any half decent security bit set should have them in a few sizes.

      FYI: Those other tiny bolts (8.5mm??) are the same size as the screwdriver fitting, so if you remove your bit, the driver works directly on them (well it did for me, I thought it was pretty sweet)

      The infamous line filters can be found on the small circuit board that hangs off the rear of the PSU, they will most likely be torn apart. I'm hoping you find a blown fuse to go with it (although I haven't seen that happen myself, my machines have all powered through the pop, including last weeks IBM 6150! God that gave me the willies)
      Last edited by SpidersWeb; February 13, 2013, 11:08 AM.
      Twitter / YouTube

      Comment


        #18
        Ditto Spider... my 5160 power supply has one of them in the middle position, too.
        PM me if you're looking for 3" or 5" floppy disks. EMail For everything else, Take Another Step

        Comment


          #19
          Originally posted by offensive_Jerk View Post
          On the bottom of the case, is there a circular plastic hole? There maybe screws inside there holding the drives in still. That's where I was having issues too.
          Sure enough, there is, with one screw! So that's what I was running into. I don't recall seeing this on my other machines, but then again I have probably looked at the bottom of them less times than I have fingers.

          I used more-than-usual force trying to get the drive out; I hope I didn't flex the circuit board beyond operational capacity. I think I heard it give a little crackle at one point

          I will purchase security torx bits tonight and see what I find.
          Offering a bounty for:
          - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
          - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

          Comment


            #20
            If you lived in Florida, I'd have repaired the PSU for you. I'm quite good with an iron, and a multimeter (though I usually use my oscilloscope so I can check for ripples and stuff.)
            IBM PS/2 Model 25, NEC V30 8MHz, 640KB RAM, ATI VGA Wonder XL, 2GB SSD, Ethernet, DR DOS 6/GeOS, Xircom PE3 Ethernet

            Comment


              #21
              Oh, don't think I'm not above paying for the service, including shipping both ways. Get your wish list updated
              Offering a bounty for:
              - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
              - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

              Comment


                #22
                Does anyone know the best size of torx security bits to use with the 5150 and 5160 power supplies?
                My Retro Computing and Vintage Gaming Blog : http://nerdlypleasures.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                  #23
                  Originally posted by Great Hierophant View Post
                  Does anyone know the best size of torx security bits to use with the 5150 and 5160 power supplies?
                  Buy a kit, will probably have 3 sizes minimum, one of them will fit. I've never had to specifically hunt out a certain size.
                  Make sure it's a security torx not just torx though, the bit needs to have the hole in the middle.
                  Twitter / YouTube

                  Comment


                    #24
                    I purchased this set below from my local Northern Tool. I recall one of the intermediate
                    sizes fit the screws on my PS/2 Model 60 power supply.

                    http://www.northerntool.com/shop/too...8721_200328721

                    Comment


                      #25
                      On ebay there is an adapter cable for converting ATX to AT with an on-off switch if you don't succeed repairing yours:
                      http://www.ebay.com/itm/20-PIN-ATX-T...item256f19eb0a (but maybe first you may have to apply the modifications Spyderwebs recommended in post 8 )

                      Comment


                        #26
                        Thanks again for the recurring suggestions (and the note about the adapter cable, had no idea that existed!).

                        After the purchase of a cheap security torx set, I was able to get it apart. I pulled out the only fuse I could see and it appears intact; it's not burnt or broken. I also couldn't find anything wrong with the components, although I completely admit I don't know what I'm looking at.

                        Here's a video, complete with rambling:



                        When I tested, it was with the power supply connected to an IDE drive, as I read from minuszerodegrees.net that the power supply requires a little bit of load to turn on.

                        Unless someone has further suggestions, I'm leaning towards the adapter cable + a new PS, and I would wire up the Big Red Switch to the switch leads on the cable. This seems like the least risky way for me to get power inside my 5161 while still retaining the vintage external appearance.
                        Offering a bounty for:
                        - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
                        - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

                        Comment


                          #27
                          May I borrow your thread for a question which is not entirely off topic. I should replace the mains cable receptacle in my XT but I understand that there could be high voltages lurking inside the PSU even when unplugged. At least there are some warning stickers suggesting so. My question is, What Should Every Man Know Before Opening a PSU, just not to do any harm to himself and the hardware?

                          Comment


                            #28
                            Originally posted by Ecky View Post
                            May I borrow your thread for a question which is not entirely off topic. I should replace the mains cable receptacle in my XT but I understand that there could be high voltages lurking inside the PSU even when unplugged. At least there are some warning stickers suggesting so. My question is, What Should Every Man Know Before Opening a PSU, just not to do any harm to himself and the hardware?
                            I'm not actually an electrical engineer, but I have repaired PSUs before and know enough that I'm not scared of them any more.

                            First of all, turn off the power.

                            With the power off, the only parts of the PSU that have dangerous voltages will be the mains capacitors (the big round cylinders that say 400V or so on them). There are usually two. Sometimes there are resistors to discharge the capacitors when power is removed, but I've worked on PSUs where they were missing or broken so don't rely on it.

                            Some people suggest just shorting the two terminals of each capacitor with a screwdriver (one with a plastic handle and metal blade, obviously). This works, but makes a big loud spark that could damage something. So I prefer the less violent method of taking a mains powered incandescent lamp (test it first), and just touching the prongs of the plug to the capacitor terminals. This discharges the capacitor into the lamp, briefly lighting it. Then short it with a screwdriver as well just to be sure that it is safe.

                            One other precaution you can take is to work with one hand behind your back. That way, if you do get a shock the current is less likely to go through your heart.

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Small update: evildragon took me up on my offer for payment-for-services so the PS is on its way to him. Once he/I know what was wrong with it, I'll update the thread.

                              This thread is a nice summary of options; going to bookmark it!
                              Offering a bounty for:
                              - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
                              - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

                              Comment


                                #30
                                I just wanted to update this thread. I got the PSU today in the mail, and I have begun diagnosing. The problem seems to be happening very early in the AC stage, because it happens well before the power is even getting rectified to DC.

                                I have zeroed the problem down to the small board mounted in the back of the PSU, right above of the power connector, and on the same board as the fuse. The fuse without a doubt is fine, because at 1v AC, it's not going to blow. The transformer appears fine, however the problem appears to be one of those orange blob capacitors. There's so much ripple and so little power, it's no wonder the poor thing won't power up.

                                http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v3...ps19f7ac78.jpg

                                I'm just hoping that ripple didn't cause more damage. I will be hunting down these capacitors, and their values on that little board, and we will see how this goes!
                                IBM PS/2 Model 25, NEC V30 8MHz, 640KB RAM, ATI VGA Wonder XL, 2GB SSD, Ethernet, DR DOS 6/GeOS, Xircom PE3 Ethernet

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X