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This forum is part of our mission to promote the preservation of vintage computers through education and outreach. (In real life we also run events and have a museum.) We encourage you to join us, participate, share your knowledge, and enjoy.

This forum has been around in this format for over 15 years. These rules and guidelines help us maintain a healthy and active community, and we moderate the forum to keep things on track. Please familiarize yourself with these rules and guidelines.


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There are several hundred people who actively participate here. People come from all different backgrounds and will have different ways of seeing things. You will not agree with everything you read here. Back-and-forth discussions are fine but do not cross the line into rude or disrespectful behavior.

Conduct yourself as you would at any other place where people come together in person to discuss their hobby. If you wouldn't say something to somebody in person, then you probably should not be writing it here.

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Anyone Selling XT-IDE Cards?

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    Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
    Maybe we can do a version that uses SD card or USB flash. Heaven knows, they're fast enough now for vintage computer work.
    I don't know about USB -> IDE bridges (at least, not the kind that go the way *we* need ) but SD -> IDE bridges do exist. I know I've seen them with the SD slot accessible through a PCI/ISA slot cover, but I don't know that I've seen them in 3.5" form factor.
    Check out The Glitch Works | My Retro Projects | Vintage Computer Services | Glitch Works Tindie Store -- Vintage Computer Kits and More

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      Just thinking aloud--CF cards, I think, are sunsetting, as are PATA devices in general. Interfacing to an SD card using SPI is very simple. That Orange Pi PC that I'm using has a 16GB Micro SD Class 10 card in it and it's nearly as fast as a SATA hard disk. The biggest problem that I see with Micro SD is losing the blasted tiny things.
      Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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        That and SMD soldering -- seems a lot of hobbyists are allergic to it. I suppose leaving footprints for e.g. an Adafruit breakout board, or just providing boards with the SMD part(s) soldered down would be OK.
        Check out The Glitch Works | My Retro Projects | Vintage Computer Services | Glitch Works Tindie Store -- Vintage Computer Kits and More

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          "That and SMD soldering -- seems a lot of hobbyists are allergic to it."

          Unsteady hands and dimming eyesight? Nah, that couldn't be it!
          "It's all bits on the bus, Cowboy! It's all bits on the bus!" -- Tom Beck, #1ESS Instructor, Southern Bell Opa Locka Training Center

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            Originally posted by DDS View Post
            Unsteady hands and dimming eyesight? Nah, that couldn't be it!
            Even younger hobbyists seem reluctant to try it out! The larger pitch stuff requires no special equipment, I started doing SOIC PICs with a 15 Watt Rat Shack pencil iron and whatever sorta-small solder they had on the shelf, on home etched boards. With a proper solder masked board, assuming you're not using paste+stencil, it's easy to just drag solder it with a squirt of liquid flux and clean up with solder wick.

            But, regardless of the reason for not wanting to do it, SMD seems to be out for most hobbyist kits. I'm set up to do small runs of SMD boards here, I'm sure I could expand enough to handle hobby level order quantities. I figure assembled (or "already contains the SMD bits" assembled) will be the way any SMD projects go for hobbyist stuff.
            Check out The Glitch Works | My Retro Projects | Vintage Computer Services | Glitch Works Tindie Store -- Vintage Computer Kits and More

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              Assembled one of my kits last weekend. After a little configuration so the address didn't conflict with the NIC the interface is working fine!





              With a ST-157a I'm getting quite respectable speeds... 588k/s and 30ms seek times!



              -J
              My Site (under construction!) | My Apple Lisa 2/10

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                My eyesight's as dim and my hands unsteadied by age as much as anyone's on this thread and I still managed to put together Jame's XTCF-V2 without incident (100% SMT). You just have to be careful.
                Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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                  Added modem7's diagrams to the Git repo, and linked to his site in the README.
                  Check out The Glitch Works | My Retro Projects | Vintage Computer Services | Glitch Works Tindie Store -- Vintage Computer Kits and More

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                    Originally posted by glitch View Post
                    it's easy to just drag solder it with a squirt of liquid flux and clean up with solder wick.
                    I doubted this method until Jim Brain demonstrated it to me in person recently. I'm still a ways away from trying it, but it did indeed work and didn't seem that bad. I thought the desoldering braid would remove all of the solder, but it only removed the solder from the top of the connections; the solder underneath remained.
                    Offering a bounty for:
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                      Yup, works a treat--it's particularly interesting in that you don't use a fine tip on the iron--a nice fat chisel tip works extremely well.

                      I do check my work with an inspection microscope after I'm done, just to be sure.
                      Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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                        That's the technique I tend to use too. I tried a reflow oven but I didn't get on with that.

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                          Got my kit today. What would be the best to use, leadfree or 60/40 solder? And what about flux and cleaning? This is the first time I am soldering something besides repair jobs and small kits at school.

                          Comment


                            Traditional multi core 60/40 is by far the easiest. Clean if you want to with toothbrush and warm water or isopropyl alcohol depending on the exact type. If using lead free you need higher bit temperature - and it smells bad.

                            Comment


                              Wow, that got to Norway pretty quick! I use 63/37 lead/tin solder with an organic acid core, which is water soluble, for the assembled units. I recommend 63/37 rosin core if you're not going to wash it or don't want to deal with organic core (which *MUST* be washed, or it causes issues). Personally I prefer Kester "44 Core" if I'm using rosin core.

                              I don't use lead free unless a customer requests it. That happens so infrequently that I don't think I've even got a roll of it on the shelf. It does require more heat. The board I shipped was finished in leaded HASL (Hot Air Solder Leveling) for the pads, and I'm betting that most of the components shipped in the kits are tinned with leaded solder too (most of them are pre-ROHS).
                              Last edited by glitch; July 6, 2016, 04:16 AM.
                              Check out The Glitch Works | My Retro Projects | Vintage Computer Services | Glitch Works Tindie Store -- Vintage Computer Kits and More

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                                Originally posted by glitch View Post
                                Added modem7's diagrams to the Git repo, and linked to his site in the README.
                                What is the link to the Git repo? I can't seem to find it.

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