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What on EARTH is this PCI card?

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    What on EARTH is this PCI card?

    Oh snap.




    Intel i960, Crystal audio chip, TI DSP, TWO C-Cube VideoRISC Processors, AND dedicated video ram.
    Whatever this capture board was made for, it offloads EVERYTHING from the system and probably does a lot more. Seeing how it has audio as well as only one composite input, I can't see this being used for security purposes.
    It was made by a company called Optivision Inc. I beleive the model of the card is the EM-4248.
    Optivision does not seem to do anything anymore that would require this card.
    Edit: Or there are two companies with the same name. Still, One channel seems a bit lacking for a security capture card.
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    #2
    How about videoconferencing? Something like this? Since you're in Canada, perhaps someone at Simon Fraser might remember this.
    Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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      #3
      I have something roughly similar in appearance. Mine has 2 of those S3 Virge or Trion chips, as if they are 2 graphics cards on 1 PCB. It also has the black plastic handle at the opposite end of the metal bracket.

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        #4
        that 50 pin connector may be for a seconday card, or a header for extra video ports and all the goodies, it's probably a multi-video board with built-in audio. but the i960 lends credence to some kind of video conferencing board, or the 50-pin is a scsi connector of some kind. That's not a composite connector, is a BNC connector i believe, leans toward some kind of highly advanced network board *could be wrong* if i had a cleaner pic of the front, i could look a little better at it.
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          #5
          Originally posted by k2x4b524[ View Post
          that 50 pin connector may be for a seconday card, or a header for extra video ports and all the goodies, it's probably a multi-video board with built-in audio. but the i960 lends credence to some kind of video conferencing board, or the 50-pin is a scsi connector of some kind. That's not a composite connector, is a BNC connector i believe, leans toward some kind of highly advanced network board *could be wrong* if i had a cleaner pic of the front, i could look a little better at it.
          If I count the pairs correctly, that header is at least 60 pins...
          Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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            #6
            Yep, that's for videoconferencing. I've got several of what I think is the new version of that card, pulled from Pentium III videoconferencing systems I acquired. Mine have socketed i960s in ceramic PGA packages...I've thought about maybe building something around the i960. Other than that, I haven't found a real use for them.
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              #7
              http://web.archive.org/web/199806241...cts/index.html

              Its likely a real time MPEG capture card (the C-Cube chips are a giveaway) from one of their video streaming systems.

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                #8
                Aww, so it's not really some incredible high resolution streaming capture card with compression. I was going to pair it with an equally long RAID card which also has an i960 and make some incredible (for the time) capture rig.
                Actually, can you still be able to do that or is this so specifically designed for one task?
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                  #9
                  It likely has NT 4.0 drivers, but its uses are probably limited to its custom application. Of course its hopelessly obsolete nowadays seeing that today's CPUs can encode HD video in h.264 in realtime! That i960 shows up in weird places, my HP Laserjet 4MP is powered by one.

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                    #10
                    Good job completely killing that card BTW putting it down on the shag carpet like that.... Bye-bye RAM's, Bye-Bye logic chips...
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                      #11
                      get it off the carpet!!

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                        #12
                        Just IMHO (and that of every computer professional I've spoken to on the matter): it takes a #$@#load of ESD to kill components in an assembled part.

                        Could rub the thing around on the shag carpetting then toss it in a box of foam peanuts and shake it up and it'll probably be fine. ESD isn't a myth, but the level of care needed to prevent damage from it is grossly overstated by many.
                        Enthusiast of keyboards with springs which buckle noisily.

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                          #13
                          It depends. We used to kill boards in the office by simply walking across the (non-ESD treated) carpet during the wintertime and touching them. As a matter of fact, we had systems that had passed hipot testing and still could be killed with a stroll across the polyester. After the carpets were treated, that did go away.

                          But just saying...
                          Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by deathshadow View Post
                            Good job completely killing that card BTW putting it down on the shag carpet like that.... Bye-bye RAM's, Bye-Bye logic chips...
                            Remember that the humidity of that carpet is probably around 65% RH - possibly higher. I lived in Vancouver for almost 50 years and most of the year you couldn't create a static buildup if your life depended on it. Certainly not using the carpet.

                            I've always been careful, but didn't realize how good I had it down there. When I moved here the first thing I noticed is that the RH was always under 50%! In fact it even goes under 30% a lot of the time. We get really good sparks around here. (Ask my cat.) Anyway, it varies by locality. In Vancouver, the carpet if fine.
                            WANTED: Cardinal 2450MNP modem.

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                              #15
                              Not sure if somebody has answered, btw, but I'm pretty sure that card is a RILOE. They're used to remotely view and control a machine without even having the machine itself powered on. I could be wrong on this, but that's what it looks like to me. They come in both x86 and i960 varieties, and were often used in Compaq and HP servers, but work in any machine (with slightly reduced functionality). These are worth a fair bit, if it works.

                              The odd connector(s) are used for control of the main computer (since this is an independent SBC). The network port is to hook the SBC to the network, so you can view the current output of the machine from a remote location. Combine the two and you can monitor and even reboot a server remotely - cool stuff.

                              The only thing that seems off, for that assessment, is the lack of a rear connector for power, but maybe not all RILOEs are designed to receive external power (i.e., it only sends information while the machine is on, and if you direct it to reboot you'd lose the feed temporarily..)?

                              Here's a picture of a Compaq RILOE, (http://web.mac.com/martinmacleod/iWe.../compaqrib.JPG).

                              The one you have, I'd guess, is a much older card with a similar purpose, and obviously not Compaq or HP (or it'd be labeled in an obvious way).

                              Originally posted by kishy View Post
                              Just IMHO (and that of every computer professional I've spoken to on the matter): it takes a #$@#load of ESD to kill components in an assembled part.

                              Could rub the thing around on the shag carpetting then toss it in a box of foam peanuts and shake it up and it'll probably be fine. ESD isn't a myth, but the level of care needed to prevent damage from it is grossly overstated by many.
                              True, but only with more modern parts than many we deal with here. Anything from 1992 or newer is probably designed to withstand ESD (this is a guess, but somewhere around there..), while 80s gear is not afaik.
                              Last edited by Raven; February 2, 2011, 11:32 AM.
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