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FYI: Computer Reset liquidation (Dallas, TX)

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    #76
    I think the overall feeling is: It's better to have the systems rescued by any means necessary, rather than end up in the crusher. Before this effort was organized, it was ALL going to the crusher. While the keyboard kidz and resellers/flippers irritate me to no end, if they rescued something that was missed, then at least it was rescued...
    Offering a bounty for:
    - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
    - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

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      #77
      Originally posted by Trixter View Post
      if they rescued something that was missed, then at least it was rescued...
      Of course, that's the problem with the keyboard kidz, their stated goal is to desolder all the keyswitches and scrap the rest. From a collecting/hobby standpoint it's just as destroyed as if a goldbug dissolved it in his garage.
      My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs Also: Blogspot

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        #78
        Originally posted by Eudimorphodon View Post
        Of course, that's the problem with the keyboard kidz, their stated goal is to desolder all the keyswitches and scrap the rest. From a collecting/hobby standpoint it's just as destroyed as if a goldbug dissolved it in his garage.
        What gave you this impression? (That they just desolder the switches.)

        Every keyboard collector I've seen generally takes a retro keyboard as it is or puts an adapter on it to use it as a USB keyboard.
        @LegalizeAdulthd | Computer Graphics Museum | Terminals Wiki | Manx Documentation Database

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          #79
          Originally posted by legalize View Post
          What gave you this impression? (That they just desolder the switches.)
          Did you read this link mentioned above?

          https://deskthority.net/viewtopic.php?t=22030

          Go down to the comments. The guy's threads have comments like this:

          Already desoldered and sent off to E3E and gainsborough!
          re: switches from a non-PC-compatible source keyboard. Dig around the forums and you'll see plenty more, like when they murdered a pile of IBM Convertibles for their Alps switches...

          Also the one encountered at Computer Reset apparently straight-up told the person that wanted a keyboard for his TI Professional that's what he was going to do with them, there's that too. Maybe he's atypical of "Keyboard Kidz" in general but just reading a few threads there seems adequate evidence to suggest there exists a significant subculture dedicated to keyswitch gutting.
          My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs Also: Blogspot

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            #80
            I shouldn't have looked at the comments, he got a Displaywriter keyboard and was pissing his pants over it.

            Comment


              #81
              Originally posted by Trixter View Post
              I think the overall feeling is: It's better to have the systems rescued by any means necessary, rather than end up in the crusher. Before this effort was organized, it was ALL going to the crusher. While the keyboard kidz and resellers/flippers irritate me to no end, if they rescued something that was missed, then at least it was rescued...
              This pretty much sums it up for me. While It burns my ass to see keyboards ripped to shreds for a trend, Its illogical to hold all people to my standards. If I could change anything, I would like to see proprietary keyboards saved, not chopped up. Past that, this is 'MURICA, and whoever pays the most money wins.
              It is a mistake to think you can solve any major problems just with potatoes.

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                #82
                White Alps keyswitches on ebay are $15 for 5 ashipped so $3 a piece minus shipping so a keyboard that has 84- 100+ keys thats up to $300 for a keyboard minus the labor to remove the switches. More exotic switches will bring more. Plus you can sell the keycaps for a few bucks each over time.

                I hate people stripping rare keyboards from the machines they go to but if they are going to be scrapped anyway why not. A year or so ago I broke a switch on one of my Northgate keyboards and was lucky enough to find a couple replacements on ebay cheap so it is working again.
                What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
                Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
                Boxed apps and games for the above systems
                Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

                Comment


                  #83
                  It's still an ***k move to tell someone to their face that you're entitled to scrap every proprietary keyboard you happened to lay hands on first at a picking party. I get it, finders keepers, to the winners goes the spoils, whatever, but it's still a giant middle finger to basic civility.
                  My Retro-computing YouTube Channel (updates... eventually?): Paleozoic PCs Also: Blogspot

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                    #84
                    If you're not going to come to Texas and buy things to add to your collection then give it a rest. I don't care for keyboard kid's tactics either, but if he hadn't purchased the keyboards who knows how many would end up in a landfill somewhere.

                    Hours are posted on the FB group - typically Saturday / Sunday as long as the family allows it to continue and as long as the weather holds out. I can't help it if you're doing your best impression of Clint Eastwood in Gran Torino and don't like FB. It is what it is and FB is something most of us use in the Dallas area and it was the easiest way to get the info out there to the collecting community.

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                      #85
                      One guy made one comment about desoldering keyswitches from one keyboard, apparently the only keyboard to ever use that switch type.

                      This stuff was headed for the shredder anyway. Better to have it saved than shredded.

                      I've got terminals with keyboards with a single busted keyswitch in my collection. Knowing that there are people who make single keyswitches available (NOS or desoldered) is useful, even if what they are doing is not what I would personally do.
                      @LegalizeAdulthd | Computer Graphics Museum | Terminals Wiki | Manx Documentation Database

                      Comment


                        #86
                        Originally posted by Al Kossow
                        1) It was 'saved' by someone who told a person who needed a keyboard for a machine that he couldn't have it. He also trashed the place in his wake.
                        I just re-read that entire thread (not the whole forum) and didn't see anything indicating this.

                        I also don't see anything "new" or particularly "egregious" here compared to all the other stuff I see. I see ebay sellers parting out machines all the time on ebay. I see recyclers cutting off "gold fingers" from boards and then trying to get me interested in the chopped up boards.

                        The world isn't full of collectors or "history folks", it's full of a variety of people all of whom have different perspectives on what these things are good for.

                        Once you start down the road of "everyone who looks at things differently than me is a lower form of human being", you end up in a dark place.

                        Hell, I know people in our community that nominally say that they are trying to get the equipment into the right hands for preservation and restoration and 10 YEARS LATER, they're still just talking and saying that they have the boards I'm looking for.

                        Bottom line is that all this stuff was rotting away in this guy's warehouse. Things clearly have been out-of-hand for many years, this isn't a recent development. He could have started getting this stuff into the hands of "people who care" long ago, but for whatever reason he didn't. Now it's a free-for-all fire sale and everythings gotta go and it's gotta go quick and it's gotta go now.

                        You can be irritated at the keyboard collectors because of their perspective on the value of things, but if you're going to blame them for their attitude, then you also have to blame the business owner for his attitude that created this gold-rush-grabbit-now scenario in the first place.

                        Speaking for myself, I'm not irritated at either party. Both of them are making the best of a tough surprise situation that the business owner found themselves in.
                        @LegalizeAdulthd | Computer Graphics Museum | Terminals Wiki | Manx Documentation Database

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                          #87
                          My day job is IT administration and computer teacher and I have many different types of students and I tell them all the time for whatever they gripe about; "Life is hard. If you can't make it easier, come hell or high water don't make it harder." I think this applies to many things. Including this one.
                          Daniel P. Cayea - The Lyon Mountain Company - Plattsburgh, New York 12901
                          Vintage Equipment: IBM 5150 * IBM 5161 * ThinkPad 770ED
                          Modern Equipment: MacBook Pro 13 * Alienware M15R3

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                            #88
                            Originally posted by legalize View Post
                            Hell, I know people in our community that nominally say that they are trying to get the equipment into the right hands for preservation and restoration and 10 YEARS LATER, they're still just talking and saying that they have the boards I'm looking for.

                            Bottom line is that all this stuff was rotting away in this guy's warehouse. Things clearly have been out-of-hand for many years, this isn't a recent development. He could have started getting this stuff into the hands of "people who care" long ago, but for whatever reason he didn't. Now it's a free-for-all fire sale and everythings gotta go and it's gotta go quick and it's gotta go now.
                            I am not sure how much I agree with your other statements but these two I can definitely fall behind. I personally know some of the people in the first line. All talk about how they want items to get into the hands of people who will appreciate them and will not chuck them or flip them on eBay. However, when it comes to deliver suddenly they are asking eBay prices and acting like they are doing you a favor.

                            As for the second one the owner was never much into selling/listing his ware. As I have mentioned I had previously bought from him and had asked specifically for certain pieces that he swore he didn't have. Recent postings would indicate otherwise. He just wasn't willing (or couldn't) dig through the stuff to make a good inventory of what he had. Plus once a few items started selling for ridiculous prices he thought he should get that all the time. If you have this much stuff to sell I would think the smart money is on selling as much as you can before you end up in a home - because as they say you can't take it with you...
                            Current Wish List: 1. IBM 7531 Industrial Series PC 2. NEC MultiSync XL (JC-2001) Monitor 3. MicroSolutions UniDOS card 4. Compaq 14" VGA CRT Monitor (the one that came with the SystemPro). 5. Stacker HW CoProcessor Board MCA BUS. If you have any of the above for sale please PM me. Thank you!

                            Comment


                              #89
                              Sadly, it seems that for a lot of these guys that have these big piles of stuff, we have to wait until they have serious medical circumstances or have passed away before the stuff becomes available to collectors at semi-reasonable prices. (My idea of "semi-reasonable" probably makes me willing to pay a lot more than the average vintage collector because I'm accustomed to ebay prices.)

                              That's how it was with The Black Hole surplus in Los Alamos. I made 4 trips down there with a trailer and hauled out heaps of stuff at very reasonable prices because Ed Grothus's heirs didn't want to continue the business and the stock on hand was their inheritance. They gave interested folks plenty of time to rescue items at a fair price (at least 6-12 months). In the end, they had a last gasp sale before what remained went to the scrapper. I probably could have pulled out even more stuff from there: Friden mechanical calculators, typewriters, some more teletype stuff, about 7 or so TI Silent 700 terminals, etc., had I put even more effort into it. As it stood, I got a good amount of stuff out of there that I'm pretty sure would have ended up on the scrap pile. It was an all day drive one way for me to pull stuff out of there, but for the things I was interested in, it was worth the effort.
                              @LegalizeAdulthd | Computer Graphics Museum | Terminals Wiki | Manx Documentation Database

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                                #90
                                People get funny when items they purchased as junk starts selling as collectable and prices keep going up.

                                Nobody really thinks about someday not being able to lift somewhat heavy objects, their eyesight slow failing, forgetting where they put everything or even what they have, and finally not being able to take care of yourself let alone the stuff you hoarded. I would think hoards like that end up in landfills more often then not.
                                What I collect: 68K/Early PPC Mac, DOS/Win 3.1 era machines, Amiga/ST, C64/128
                                Nubus/ISA/VLB/MCA/EISA cards of all types
                                Boxed apps and games for the above systems
                                Analog video capture cards/software and complete systems

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