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Looking for an IBM EduQuest System.

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    Looking for an IBM EduQuest System.

    I'm looking for an Eduquest system. They look like a PS/2 Model 25. I'd like it to be either at or below 100 dollars, but I'll look at any offer.

    Here's an example of what I'm looking for,
    Last edited by DOS lives on!!; August 23, 2011, 03:46 PM.
    ~Ian~

    Remember, wherever you go, there you are.

    #2
    Originally posted by DOS lives on!! View Post
    I'm looking for an Eduquest system. They look like a PS/2 Model 25. I'd like it to be either at or below 100 dollars, but I'll look at any offer.

    Here's what one looks like,
    Level? There are from 386SLC models to 486DX4-100. IBM spelled out the model numbers in this line, ¨Thirty¨ to ¨Fifty-Five¨ (William has it a little wrong, and leaves off a model):

    http://walshcomptech.com/ps2/eduquest.htm

    We might be able to deal on a ¨Forty¨...
    Disclaimer: The username IBMMuseum and domain IBMMuseum.com are not affiliated with IBM in any manner

    Comment


      #3
      remembers using these in my schools lybrary as a kid sept they had the cartige cd drives
      Pegcity bits the home of praire bits and bytes a heritage lost yet not
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      Osborn 1 x2
      pdp8a with asr33 and documentation and software
      GE workmaster with series six PLC and ibm p70 (same as a ge workmaster 2)
      Commodore PC-10 II and other stuff

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by 1ajs View Post
        remembers using these in my schools lybrary as a kid sept they had the cartige cd drives
        The picture does show the CD drive that uses the ¨caddy¨. ¨CD-ROM II¨ or something like that, as IBM called them. You can switch in a (usually SCSI) non-caddy drive, and there were EduQuests that came without them, didn´t have the sound system, or NIC (a special Token Ring or Ethernet adapter).

        I think all models had DOS in ROM (with drivers that could run the CD drive) too...
        Disclaimer: The username IBMMuseum and domain IBMMuseum.com are not affiliated with IBM in any manner

        Comment


          #5
          Ah, EduQuests!

          If you do stumble upon one please take detailed, decent resolution photos (if a decent camera is available) and place them somewhere accessible online...these computers are some of the harder ones to find images of (particularly with any level of detail, for example how they come apart etc)

          If I didn't have a Model 25 I'd be hunting for one of these (and indeed my original hunt was for a 25 'or' EduQuest, was not too concerned about which).
          Last edited by kishy; August 22, 2011, 10:22 PM.
          Enthusiast of keyboards with springs which buckle noisily.

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            #6
            I have an Eduquest 55 I'd be willing to part with. Let me know if you're interested. It's pretty heavy so shipping cost will probably be a significant factor.

            This has a 66Mhz 486, 20M of RAM, 2G hard drive, NIC and sound card. Has MS-DOS 6 and Win 3.11 installed. No CD-ROM drive.

            http://www.strollin.net/Eduquest55_front.jpg

            http://www.strollin.net/eduquest55_back.jpg
            Last edited by strollin; August 23, 2011, 03:32 PM.

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              #7
              I've an Eduquest as well, not sure of the specific type, but it's a 486SX-25 or 33. It came with the caddy CD-ROM, sound, and NIC. The hard drive was also in good shape, and outside of the specific networking information from the school it was located at, hasn't had anything else installed/changed from factory.

              It has both SCSI and IDE on-board, which I thought was really cool, and the front audio panel was a nice touch. One of these days, I'll get around to photographing and documenting my systems (this is definitely one that needs documenting, as there is very little out there outside of William's site)

              As for how they come apart it's two screws on the back side (not under-side), then the motherboard tray just pulls out. Be careful when pulling this out, however. You'll need to disconnect the audio panel header and the video header in order to pull the tray out all the way.
              ---
              Currently seeking:
              * Roland MPU-401/AT (with daughter card header)
              * Magitronic K-156 Keyboard (5pin DIN w/ XT-AT switch)
              I also collect PC and C64 Sierra On-Line software!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Maverick1978 View Post
                ... As for how they come apart it's two screws on the back side (not under-side), then the motherboard tray just pulls out. Be careful when pulling this out, however. You'll need to disconnect the audio panel header and the video header in order to pull the tray out all the way.
                This statement messed me up a bit. I was trying to open up the Eduquest 55 I have and removed the 2 screws you mentioned but, try as I might, could not slide the tray out. I finally noticed that there's a third screw on mine, just under a recess so it was somewhat difficult to see.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by Maverick1978 View Post
                  I've an Eduquest as well, not sure of the specific type, but it's a 486SX-25 or 33. It came with the caddy CD-ROM, sound, and NIC. The hard drive was also in good shape, and outside of the specific networking information from the school it was located at, hasn't had anything else installed/changed from factory.

                  It has both SCSI and IDE on-board, which I thought was really cool, and the front audio panel was a nice touch. One of these days, I'll get around to photographing and documenting my systems (this is definitely one that needs documenting, as there is very little out there outside of William's site)

                  As for how they come apart it's two screws on the back side (not under-side), then the motherboard tray just pulls out. Be careful when pulling this out, however. You'll need to disconnect the audio panel header and the video header in order to pull the tray out all the way.
                  Interesting...seems like they leaned in the direction of the PS/55-series 5530 rather than the Model 25, in some regards.

                  And DIN for serial? That seems un-IBM-like. Cool.
                  Enthusiast of keyboards with springs which buckle noisily.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by kishy View Post
                    Interesting...seems like they leaned in the direction of the PS/55-series 5530 rather than the Model 25, in some regards.

                    And DIN for serial? That seems un-IBM-like. Cool.
                    A microchannel "All-In-One" would be nifty (I guess there are "portable", "laptop", and "notebook" MCA, but they don't have a CRT). More innovative systems were released for the Japanese markets rather than here. My "SCSILEVL" page has 80188-based adapters I worked with "Sandy" (actually a male) to document, not available in Western markets at the time.
                    Disclaimer: The username IBMMuseum and domain IBMMuseum.com are not affiliated with IBM in any manner

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Hey! I just sent you a message about the EduQuest45. I have one that's been living peacefully in my dining room for several years now, and am looking to sell it to someone who will appreciate it for all of its awesome retro goodness. It runs perfectly and has a Floppy Drive as well as a disk drive, and looks identical to that photo!

                      Thanks

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Replied to your PM, and for the future, I bought my EduQuest from Strollin and it's still working great!
                        ~Ian~

                        Remember, wherever you go, there you are.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I've just inherited an EduQuest Fifty-Five (486SX-50) and it has a built-in RJ45 network adapter but I've tried every single crynwr packet driver tonight and nothing can init the board. Anyone know what kind of network board is this and what packet driver it uses?
                          Offering a bounty for:
                          - A working Sanyo MBC-775 or Logabax 1600
                          - Music Construction Set, IBM Music Feature edition (has red sticker on front stating IBM Music Feature)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Do you have a picture of the NIC that's in it? If it's an OEM IBM one, similar to the one in mine is, then the VPEther package should work.
                            ~Ian~

                            Remember, wherever you go, there you are.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Trixter View Post
                              I've just inherited an EduQuest Fifty-Five (486SX-50) and it has a built-in RJ45 network adapter but I've tried every single crynwr packet driver tonight and nothing can init the board. Anyone know what kind of network board is this and what packet driver it uses?
                              Just saw this... I'll have to check. I think that my 45 has the same drive, and works perfectly. That said, I have software for a 55. Unless I'm getting my numbers mixed up again Will check and let you know...
                              ---
                              Currently seeking:
                              * Roland MPU-401/AT (with daughter card header)
                              * Magitronic K-156 Keyboard (5pin DIN w/ XT-AT switch)
                              I also collect PC and C64 Sierra On-Line software!

                              Comment

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