Announcement

Collapse

Forum Rules and Etiquette

Our mission ...

This forum is part of our mission to promote the preservation of vintage computers through education and outreach. (In real life we also run events and have a museum.) We encourage you to join us, participate, share your knowledge, and enjoy.

This forum has been around in this format for over 15 years. These rules and guidelines help us maintain a healthy and active community, and we moderate the forum to keep things on track. Please familiarize yourself with these rules and guidelines.


Rule 1: Remain civil and respectful

There are several hundred people who actively participate here. People come from all different backgrounds and will have different ways of seeing things. You will not agree with everything you read here. Back-and-forth discussions are fine but do not cross the line into rude or disrespectful behavior.

Conduct yourself as you would at any other place where people come together in person to discuss their hobby. If you wouldn't say something to somebody in person, then you probably should not be writing it here.

This should be obvious but, just in case: profanity, threats, slurs against any group (sexual, racial, gender, etc.) will not be tolerated.


Rule 2: Stay close to the original topic being discussed
  • If you are starting a new thread choose a reasonable sub-forum to start your thread. (If you choose incorrectly don't worry, we can fix that.)
  • If you are responding to a thread, stay on topic - the original poster was trying to achieve something. You can always start a new thread instead of potentially "hijacking" an existing thread.



Rule 3: Contribute something meaningful

To put things in engineering terms, we value a high signal to noise ratio. Coming here should not be a waste of time.
  • This is not a chat room. If you are taking less than 30 seconds to make a post then you are probably doing something wrong. A post should be on topic, clear, and contribute something meaningful to the discussion. If people read your posts and feel that their time as been wasted, they will stop reading your posts. Worse yet, they will stop visiting and we'll lose their experience and contributions.
  • Do not bump threads.
  • Do not "necro-post" unless you are following up to a specific person on a specific thread. And even then, that person may have moved on. Just start a new thread for your related topic.
  • Use the Private Message system for posts that are targeted at a specific person.


Rule 4: "PM Sent!" messages (or, how to use the Private Message system)

This forum has a private message feature that we want people to use for messages that are not of general interest to other members.

In short, if you are going to reply to a thread and that reply is targeted to a specific individual and not of interest to anybody else (either now or in the future) then send a private message instead.

Here are some obvious examples of when you should not reply to a thread and use the PM system instead:
  • "PM Sent!": Do not tell the rest of us that you sent a PM ... the forum software will tell the other person that they have a PM waiting.
  • "How much is shipping to ....": This is a very specific and directed question that is not of interest to anybody else.


Why do we have this policy? Sending a "PM Sent!" type message basically wastes everybody else's time by making them having to scroll past a post in a thread that looks to be updated, when the update is not meaningful. And the person you are sending the PM to will be notified by the forum software that they have a message waiting for them. Look up at the top near the right edge where it says 'Notifications' ... if you have a PM waiting, it will tell you there.

Rule 5: Copyright and other legal issues

We are here to discuss vintage computing, so discussing software, books, and other intellectual property that is on-topic is fine. We don't want people using these forums to discuss or enable copyright violations or other things that are against the law; whether you agree with the law or not is irrelevant. Do not use our resources for something that is legally or morally questionable.

Our discussions here generally fall under "fair use." Telling people how to pirate a software title is an example of something that is not allowable here.


Reporting problematic posts

If you see spam, a wildly off-topic post, or something abusive or illegal please report the thread by clicking on the "Report Post" icon. (It looks like an exclamation point in a triangle and it is available under every post.) This send a notification to all of the moderators, so somebody will see it and deal with it.

If you are unsure you may consider sending a private message to a moderator instead.


New user moderation

New users are directly moderated so that we can weed spammers out early. This means that for your first 10 posts you will have some delay before they are seen. We understand this can be disruptive to the flow of conversation and we try to keep up with our new user moderation duties to avoid undue inconvenience. Please do not make duplicate posts, extra posts to bump your post count, or ask the moderators to expedite this process; 10 moderated posts will go by quickly.

New users also have a smaller personal message inbox limit and are rate limited when sending PMs to other users.


Other suggestions
  • Use Google, books, or other definitive sources. There is a lot of information out there.
  • Don't make people guess at what you are trying to say; we are not mind readers. Be clear and concise.
  • Spelling and grammar are not rated, but they do make a post easier to read.
See more
See less

Things I hate doing: ethernet RJ45/8P8C plug replacement

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Things I hate doing: ethernet RJ45/8P8C plug replacement

    I replace ethernet UTP plugs so infrequently that I forget any shortcuts I use the next time that the job comes around. So this is a reminder to me, more than anything.

    I've got some cable strung where the return (striped) wires are only faintly marked and the marking comes off if they're handled too much. So how to get the wires all bundled nicely so they go into the crimp connector easily. If you've never done this, you're in for an experience.

    What I do: Strip the jacket off the cable for a distance of perhaps an inch and a half. Using a strip of painter's (masking will do) tape, lay the conductors out on the tape in the correct order (T568B or T568A, depending on what the connector on the other end indicates), leaving perhaps a half-inch extending over the far edge of the tape. Wrap the tape around the bundle so that the order is preserved. Trim the ends of the wires so that they're nice and even. Insert the cable, with tape still intact, into the connector and crimp. Release the jacket clamp and slide the jacket into the connector.

    Anyone have any better methods?
    Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

    #2
    Sounds good to me. Do you make house calls?

    Greg

    Comment


      #3
      what a great idea! I was trying to figure out how to use up 100 feet of 50 conductor twist but not flat that was sent to me by mistake

      Comment


        #4
        I suspect that many people simply trash the cable and replace it with a new one. That's not really an option for really long cables that were hell to lay to begin with. I guess there's always WiFi. In a way, I miss thinnet. One conductor, good durable BNC fittings, easy to install. Just don't lose the terminators. When I went to UTP, I simply taped the end of the cat5 cable to the coax and pulled it through between floors.

        Al, I know what you mean. I'm staring at a job that I really need to do with 62 conductor round cable and DC62 solder-cup connectors.
        Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
          I suspect that many people simply trash the cable and replace it with a new one. That's not really an option for really long cables that were hell to lay to begin with. I guess there's always WiFi. In a way, I miss thinnet. One conductor, good durable BNC fittings, easy to install. Just don't lose the terminators. When I went to UTP, I simply taped the end of the cat5 cable to the coax and pulled it through between floors.

          Al, I know what you mean. I'm staring at a job that I really need to do with 62 conductor round cable and DC62 solder-cup connectors.
          Thats why I got a jar of these:-

          https://www.ebay.com/itm/353398224930

          not cheap, but they fit over most clips and can save a lot of pain and grief when the cable is inaccessible.
          Dave
          G4UGM

          Looking for Analog Computers, Drum Plotters, and Graphics Terminals.

          Comment


            #6
            I must admit almost all my cables with plugs on are short patch leads and all the long runs are punch down into keystones. Desktop patch panels are really useful to tidy up runs of cables at the switch rather than plugging them all.
            Current fleet
            TRS80 Model 4 - BBC B - Tatung Einstein - PCW9512 - PET 3032 - C64 - ZX81 - Spectrum 48K - Amiga A500 - Apple II europlus - Apple iMAC G3. Sharp MZ-80K. - IBM 5160 XT - Multibus 286/10 - Micro PDP 11/73 - Rainbow PC100A - MicroVax II - MicroVAX 3100, 3300, VAX 4000 VLC & 4000 Model 96 - AlphaStation 225 Apricot PC - Apple Performa 6200 - Apple Mac IIcx - Osborne 1 - ACT Sirius 1

            Comment


              #7
              Meh, it's probably just as economical to pick up a bunch of the cheap TPLink N300 range extenders and ditch the long cables. They work a treat when configured as Wifi links. With vintage gear (no ISA Wifi cards) or PCs in rackmount configuration (no Wifi in a metal box) they work well.
              Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                Meh, it's probably just as economical to pick up a bunch of the cheap TPLink N300 range extenders and ditch the long cables. They work a treat when configured as Wifi links. With vintage gear (no ISA Wifi cards) or PCs in rackmount configuration (no Wifi in a metal box) they work well.
                You're right on ditching the cables. I've been using a similar setup for 4 or 5 years with no problems - wi-fi and streaming, as well as various lighting systems and Echos.

                Surely not everyone was Kung-Fu fighting

                Comment


                  #9
                  I minimise the use of wifi wherever possible. You just can't beat a hardwired link

                  But then again, I have run cables throughout the house and each node of the wifi mesh has a hardwired backhaul. Makes for a seamless system.
                  Current fleet
                  TRS80 Model 4 - BBC B - Tatung Einstein - PCW9512 - PET 3032 - C64 - ZX81 - Spectrum 48K - Amiga A500 - Apple II europlus - Apple iMAC G3. Sharp MZ-80K. - IBM 5160 XT - Multibus 286/10 - Micro PDP 11/73 - Rainbow PC100A - MicroVax II - MicroVAX 3100, 3300, VAX 4000 VLC & 4000 Model 96 - AlphaStation 225 Apricot PC - Apple Performa 6200 - Apple Mac IIcx - Osborne 1 - ACT Sirius 1

                  Comment


                    #10
                    When one has a 10baseT NIC installed, WiFi isn't even breaking a sweat servicing it. Probably barely budges the needle on older gear using 100BaseT in many cases. For me, it's mostly about file transfer and perhaps a little internal telnetting.

                    When are you going to replace all that copper with fiber, Gary?
                    Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I have literally replaced or installed, in my estimate, 100o's of RJ45 connectors. I was high school CompTIA A+ computer science teacher for 18 years, LOL. I always dreaded the "creating an EIA/TIA 568A/B Ethernet cable" chapter because my fingers would be so sore after a few days of "Show and tell".

                      "White-Orange, Orange, White-Green, Blue, White-Blue, Green, White-Brown, Brown" is burned into my brain, LOL. (That's a standard 568B wiring scheme)

                      Your method sounds good for people that rarely make these cables. I'm not kidding here, I can make those ends using just my fingers, a wire cutter, and crimp tool in under 45 seconds flat. 30 Seconds when I'm hopped up on coffee! Yeah, it's a skill that will take me far, I know.

                      My students always pointed out these:

                      https://www.platinumtools.com/produc...ctors-100026c/

                      (This is the RJ11/12 version but they make them for RJ45 too)

                      Yep, way easier, but 4 to 5 times the cost per connector that the school would not shell out (40-50 students per year times about a dozen connectors before they got the hang of it. Plus the connectors I would go through showing the process over, and over, and over again). Also requires a special crimp tool that cuts the wire ends as it crimps.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by g4ugm View Post

                        Thats why I got a jar of these:-

                        https://www.ebay.com/itm/353398224930

                        not cheap, but they fit over most clips and can save a lot of pain and grief when the cable is inaccessible.
                        I've never seen these. Do they fit snugly or would a drop of super glue help?

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                          When one has a 10baseT NIC installed, WiFi isn't even breaking a sweat servicing it. Probably barely budges the needle on older gear using 100BaseT in many cases. For me, it's mostly about file transfer and perhaps a little internal telnetting.

                          When are you going to replace all that copper with fiber, Gary?
                          Lol

                          I meant for modern use. When the kids were at home, with three games consoles and two PC/Mac desktops with five phones, a Wii, and two laptops, all on at the same time the wifi was pretty crowded. Offloading most of it onto Cat6 certainly made a difference, especially to latency. Now I have fibre to the home and one of the kids starting a music business, its still paying dividends, 6 years later.

                          Fibre is a pain, I did think about it when crawling about the loft but without a splicer at home
                          Current fleet
                          TRS80 Model 4 - BBC B - Tatung Einstein - PCW9512 - PET 3032 - C64 - ZX81 - Spectrum 48K - Amiga A500 - Apple II europlus - Apple iMAC G3. Sharp MZ-80K. - IBM 5160 XT - Multibus 286/10 - Micro PDP 11/73 - Rainbow PC100A - MicroVax II - MicroVAX 3100, 3300, VAX 4000 VLC & 4000 Model 96 - AlphaStation 225 Apricot PC - Apple Performa 6200 - Apple Mac IIcx - Osborne 1 - ACT Sirius 1

                          Comment


                            #14
                            The last time I had the side of the house opened up (replacing a balcony), I took a hunk of PVC pipe and ran it in the joist space between floors and placed a hunk of steel wire in it (so I could locate it later)--should be a piece of cake snaking a cable through that. Never got around to using it, however. I'm still using the run I made with a *long* drill bit for RG58/U coax 30 years ago.. I doubt that it will change before they haul my carcass off somewhere. Maybe for the next occupants...

                            A question for the experts on installing 8P8C plugs: If I'm making my own cables, is there any reason that I can't make my cables without the silly white-green crossover? That is, on both ends, use White-orange, Orange, White-blue, Blue, White-green, Green, White-Brown, Brown" ordering? I know that the "B" ordering is descended from telco standards, but electrically, will the alternate pairing affect transmission characteristics?
                            Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Chuck(G) View Post
                              The last time I had the side of the house opened up (replacing a balcony), I took a hunk of PVC pipe and ran it in the joist space between floors and placed a hunk of steel wire in it (so I could locate it later)--should be a piece of cake snaking a cable through that. Never got around to using it, however. I'm still using the run I made with a *long* drill bit for RG58/U coax 30 years ago.. I doubt that it will change before they haul my carcass off somewhere. Maybe for the next occupants...

                              A question for the experts on installing 8P8C plugs: If I'm making my own cables, is there any reason that I can't make my cables without the silly white-green crossover? That is, on both ends, use White-orange, Orange, White-blue, Blue, White-green, Green, White-Brown, Brown" ordering? I know that the "B" ordering is descended from telco standards, but electrically, will the alternate pairing affect transmission characteristics?
                              This funky wiring scheme is done to prevent cross-talk between the wires. When I took over managing a local computer store in 1998 a previous tech had just installed a small hub based Ethernet network in a 20 computer classroom at a local church. They were complaining that things were slow and not working most of the time. The tech, not knowing EIA/TIA standards did exactly what you suggested. When I corrected the wiring everything went smooth after that. I always used that as a real-world example in my classroom of the importance of eliminating cross-talk in cabling.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X