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Dallas Clock Chip Mod

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    Dallas Clock Chip Mod

    Is it possible or advisable to modify a Dallas Clock Chip with a coin cell battery holder while the chip is still in the motherboard? Or too dangerous?
    "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

    #2
    I've seen it done several times, so it's possible. I'm not sure that, given my clumsiness, that I'd consider it to be advisable for me.
    Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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      #3
      I've done it and seen others do it to the Onyx IO4 board among others where there is too big a risk damaging something trying to desolder it. The key is to just work very carefully with the dremel.
      [Need something to waste time on? Click here to visit my YouTube channel CelGenStudios]
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        #4
        I shall try it out and see how it goes!!! I am pretty good with a dremel (much better than soldering that chip out and then back in!)
        "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

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          #5
          Would this Dallas chip also hold the CMOS? If so, wouldn't you have to do the battery hack described in this thread?

          http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...ave&highlight=

          Comment


            #6
            I've done it on a board once; I damaged the board beside the module and it was unusable thereafter. If I had been using better tools and been more careful it would have worked. You "can" do it but you need to be precise in your actions.

            Some boards, the module is directly adjacent to an expansion slot and the battery contact side might be inaccessible. It's a no-go there.

            I have also desoldered the RTC module and put the new one (or modded one) into a DIP socket instead...that's the approach I would personally recommend. You need a decently hot iron to melt some of the contacts' solder all the way through and a good desoldering tool of your choice. I prefer the vacuum sucker things but others have differing opinions.

            Worth noting, the same can also be done to the ODIN-brand compatible modules, and Houston Tech modules (but they're a little different and easier, the lid just pops off, it isn't all glued together in potting compound).
            Enthusiast of keyboards with springs which buckle noisily.

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              #7
              I've recently done it to a Pentium socket 4 mainboard, Intel Premiere I think... it had the DS1287 on board and soldered in. Just used my Dremel like thingie and went very careful, job was done in about 20 minutes, though:

              DS1287_01.jpg
              DS1287_02.jpg
              DS1287_03.jpg
              Oh man, this isn't happening... it only thinks it's happening. - Kevin Flynn

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by Grandcheapskate View Post
                Would this Dallas chip also hold the CMOS? If so, wouldn't you have to do the battery hack described in this thread?

                http://www.vcfed.org/forum/showthrea...ave&highlight=
                Yes, The CMOS is held in the Dallas Clock, or at least has the settings saved....the process I need to do is exactly like the one Denniske1976 posted

                Originally posted by kishy View Post
                I've done it on a board once; I damaged the board beside the module and it was unusable thereafter. If I had been using better tools and been more careful it would have worked. You "can" do it but you need to be precise in your actions.

                Some boards, the module is directly adjacent to an expansion slot and the battery contact side might be inaccessible. It's a no-go there.

                I have also desoldered the RTC module and put the new one (or modded one) into a DIP socket instead...that's the approach I would personally recommend. You need a decently hot iron to melt some of the contacts' solder all the way through and a good desoldering tool of your choice. I prefer the vacuum sucker things but others have differing opinions.

                Worth noting, the same can also be done to the ODIN-brand compatible modules, and Houston Tech modules (but they're a little different and easier, the lid just pops off, it isn't all glued together in potting compound).
                I thought about doing that with the socket, but I am MUCH better with a dremmel than I am a soldering iron. Those pins are close together on the board and I fear when I attempt to solder the socket holder on, I will either create cold joints or cross some of the pins with solder going between each....

                The chip on this board is away from the slots and has easy access to it in terms of space for the dremmel, so I am gonna give that a go.

                Anyone ever used an old soldering iron to burn the plastic away on those Dallas chips? I did it for a RTC on a Sun Sparcstation and easily got down to the pins and then from there dremmel'd out the last few areas. But that chip was out of the board when I did it....not sure what kind of damage I could do with this chip still in the board...
                "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

                Comment


                  #9
                  Hmm, I would have thought that the "plastic" was epoxy-resin-based potting compound. A slip of the iron could mean disaster. But maybe you've got better hand-eye coordination...
                  Reach me: vcfblackhole _at_ protonmail dot com.

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                    #10
                    Lol.....I just call it plastic. You are right, it is some compound, but I had good luck with an old soldering iron as it messes up the tip....but it gets through the stuff pretty quick. I do have Decent hand eye still, even though it's getting worse as I get a little older!! 3 weeks away from 40, not as good as it was, but still pretty decent!!!
                    "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      I modified one of mine which was soldered to the motherboard. I used a short knife (penknife size) to carefully scrape away the material until the terminals were exposed. It can be done, you just have to take your time, don't rush and be careful.

                      Personally I wouldn't melt the material with a soldering iron. Seems messy. If it turns to goo it might run somewhere.

                      Tez
                      ------------------------------------------------
                      My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
                      My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
                      Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I am gonna start tonight and begin scraping with a knife. If I don't find myself getting there, I am gonna bite the bullet and desolder it and then do it right

                        Tezza, but fan of your blog. I really enjoy reading it. It's something I've wanted to do as I go through various retro computers and projects but just can't get myself started on it (blogging)
                        "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by Smack2k View Post
                          Tezza, but fan of your blog. I really enjoy reading it. It's something I've wanted to do as I go through various retro computers and projects but just can't get myself started on it (blogging)
                          Thanks. I find my blog articles are often useful to myself, as I sometimes forget why and how I've done something in the past (:

                          I like writing them up. For me, it draws an underline under a project and finishes it off. In essence they say "Here's what I did, here's the result and here's what I learnt". It's good to know others enjoy them and gives me motivation to keep documenting these activities.

                          Tez
                          ------------------------------------------------
                          My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
                          My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
                          Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Keep up the good work, I for sure will keep reading...

                            So I desoldered the chip from the board....no issues.....I have cut into it and hit what seems like metal, but its all one solid mass on both sides of the 3 middle pins...I dont see the metal piece that goes up to a smaller neck (that gets cut) and then up to the rest of the metal. Its all one seemingly metal piece....this is a DS12887 Chip if that helps....
                            "In Life, The Days Are Long But The Years Are Short..."

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by Smack2k View Post
                              So I desoldered the chip from the board....no issues.....I have cut into it and hit what seems like metal, but its all one solid mass on both sides of the 3 middle pins...I dont see the metal piece that goes up to a smaller neck (that gets cut) and then up to the rest of the metal. Its all one seemingly metal piece....this is a DS12887 Chip if that helps....
                              Hmm...I can't say if it's the same as the DS 1287 ones' I've done or not. It might be different. I'm assuming you've got the original source instructions, like I had.

                              Tez
                              ------------------------------------------------
                              My vintage collection: https://classic-computers.org.nz/collection/
                              My vintage activities blog: https://www.classic-computers.org.nz/blog/
                              Twitter: @classiccomputNZ ; YouTube Videos: (click here)

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