Announcement

Collapse

Forum etiquette

Our mission ...

This forum is part of our mission to promote the preservation of vintage computers through education and outreach. (In real life we also run events and have a museum.) We encourage you to join us, participate, share your knowledge, and enjoy.

This forum has been around in this format for over 15 years. These rules and guidelines help us maintain a healthy and active community, and we moderate the forum to keep things on track. Please familiarize yourself with these rules and guidelines.


Remain civil and respectful

There are several hundred people who actively participate here. People come from all different backgrounds and will have different ways of seeing things. You will not agree with everything you read here. Back-and-forth discussions are fine but do not cross the line into rude or disrespectful behavior.

Conduct yourself as you would at any other place where people come together in person to discuss their hobby. If you wouldn't say something to somebody in person, then you probably should not be writing it here.

This should be obvious but, just in case: profanity, threats, slurs against any group (sexual, racial, gender, etc.) will not be tolerated.


Stay close to the original topic being discussed
  • If you are starting a new thread choose a reasonable sub-forum to start your thread. (If you choose incorrectly don't worry, we can fix that.)
  • If you are responding to a thread, stay on topic - the original poster was trying to achieve something. You can always start a new thread instead of potentially "hijacking" an existing thread.



Contribute something meaningful

To put things in engineering terms, we value a high signal to noise ratio. Coming here should not be a waste of time.
  • This is not a chat room. If you are taking less than 30 seconds to make a post then you are probably doing something wrong. A post should be on topic, clear, and contribute something meaningful to the discussion. If people read your posts and feel that their time as been wasted, they will stop reading your posts. Worse yet, they will stop visiting and we'll lose their experience and contributions.
  • Do not bump threads.
  • Do not "necro-post" unless you are following up to a specific person on a specific thread. And even then, that person may have moved on. Just start a new thread for your related topic.
  • Use the Private Message system for posts that are targeted at a specific person.


"PM Sent!" messages (or, how to use the Private Message system)

This forum has a private message feature that we want people to use for messages that are not of general interest to other members.

In short, if you are going to reply to a thread and that reply is targeted to a specific individual and not of interest to anybody else (either now or in the future) then send a private message instead.

Here are some obvious examples of when you should not reply to a thread and use the PM system instead:
  • "PM Sent!": Do not tell the rest of us that you sent a PM ... the forum software will tell the other person that they have a PM waiting.
  • "How much is shipping to ....": This is a very specific and directed question that is not of interest to anybody else.


Why do we have this policy? Sending a "PM Sent!" type message basically wastes everybody else's time by making them having to scroll past a post in a thread that looks to be updated, when the update is not meaningful. And the person you are sending the PM to will be notified by the forum software that they have a message waiting for them. Look up at the top near the right edge where it says 'Notifications' ... if you have a PM waiting, it will tell you there.

Copyright and other legal issues

We are here to discuss vintage computing, so discussing software, books, and other intellectual property that is on-topic is fine. We don't want people using these forums to discuss or enable copyright violations or other things that are against the law; whether you agree with the law or not is irrelevant. Do not use our resources for something that is legally or morally questionable.

Our discussions here generally fall under "fair use." Telling people how to pirate a software title is an example of something that is not allowable here.


Reporting problematic posts

If you see spam, a wildly off-topic post, or something abusive or illegal please report the thread by clicking on the "Report Post" icon. (It looks like an exclamation point in a triangle and it is available under every post.) This send a notification to all of the moderators, so somebody will see it and deal with it.

If you are unsure you may consider sending a private message to a moderator instead.


New user moderation

New users are directly moderated so that we can weed spammers out early. This means that for your first 10 posts you will have some delay before they are seen. We understand this can be disruptive to the flow of conversation and we try to keep up with our new user moderation duties to avoid undue inconvenience. Please do not make duplicate posts, extra posts to bump your post count, or ask the moderators to expedite this process; 10 moderated posts will go by quickly.

New users also have a smaller personal message inbox limit and are rate limited when sending PMs to other users.


Other suggestions
  • Use Google, books, or other definitive sources. There is a lot of information out there.
  • Don't make people guess at what you are trying to say; we are not mind readers. Be clear and concise.
  • Spelling and grammar are not rated, but they do make a post easier to read.
See more
See less

Scanners

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Scanners

    This may be a little off-topic, but. . .

    Part of my collection is document related. I have dozens of manuals, sales brochures, books and magazines, some of which I would like to scan and make available on the web (via vintage-computer.com)

    I have a couple of page scanners here, but they are slow and clunky, especially when working with bound materials.

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how I could scan some of this stuff and make it useful for others?

    Thanks,

    Erik
    The Vintage Computer and Gaming Marketplace
    The Vintage Computer

    #2
    Re: Scanners

    "Erik" wrote in message:

    Hi Erik,

    > This may be a little off-topic, but. . .

    > Part of my collection is document related. I have dozens of
    > manuals, sales brochures, books and magazines, some of
    > which I would like to scan and make available on the web.

    > I have a couple of page scanners here, but they are slow
    > and clunky, especially when working with bound materials.

    > Does anyone have any suggestions on how I could scan
    > some of this stuff and make it useful for others?

    Do you have any drivers available for the scanner? If you're
    using Windows, then it may come with the drivers. But I've
    only ever seen Windows supplying the Printer Drivers.

    I don't have any scanners myself, but have occasionally
    used them in programs like PhotoShop. However, I've
    only used them in the Graphical sense. I haven't done
    any OCRing or anything like that.

    My second suggestion maybe to try Gaby Chaudry who I
    know uses scanners for documents, so maybe she could
    help you there. Her e-mail is mailto:gaby@gaby.de
    It maybe a long shot, but if you already have the
    drivers for the scanner & just need to know to do OCR
    some text via the scanner, then Gaby maybe able to
    help.

    Cheers.
    Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

    Comment


      #3
      With the scanners I have I'm pretty much able to do what I want, only very very slowly.

      I think the faster of my scanners does about 1.5 minutes per page. That's way too slow to scan most materials.

      I probably need to find a document scanner specifically for doing large scans of text with minimal graphics.

      That still won't solve my magazine problem. How does one scan magazines without ruining the bindings?

      Erik
      The Vintage Computer and Gaming Marketplace
      The Vintage Computer

      Comment


        #4
        "Erik" wrote in message:

        > With the scanners I have I'm pretty much able to do what I want,
        > only very very slowly.

        > I think the faster of my scanners does about 1.5 minutes per
        > page. That's way too slow to scan most materials.

        It just seems like the scanners you have aren't able to do what
        you want to do. In other words, there perhaps more specifically
        designed to scan in just the odd thing.
        However, I could be wrong in suggesting that. For example I
        have a Cannon printer which took a long time to print anything (particuilarly in Colour) on my 386 computer (which had
        Win3.1 running on it at the time). This took minutes before
        anything would happen, but once it did the printer was up &
        away. I don't know if adding more memory to your computer
        will help, it may just be the parallel port it's running on.

        The only other example I can say is in relation to my Dot
        Matrix printer that I'm running in Win95. It's slower to
        print out in that, than in DOS. Unfortunately I don't know
        of any DOS programs used in conjunction with scanning
        (Gaby might know though). It's just a matter of having
        some drivers which are available in DOS. But if it's DOS
        you're using, then I'm afraid it's just the scanner.

        > I probably need to find a document scanner specifically for doing
        > large scans of text with minimal graphics.

        They do exist. Gaby should be able to point you to some.
        Scanning out graphics is a time-consuming thing, so I
        wouldn't be suprised if text is must quicker. The downside
        to scanning text (I think), is you might have to go though
        the document to check for anything the scanners has
        scanned in incorrectly.

        > That still won't solve my magazine problem. How does one
        > scan magazines without ruining the bindings?

        Well, again I'm afraid I don't know, sorry! If you had a hand
        held scanner you could just open the book up & scan the
        pages in though that. Photocopying the magazine is just like
        using a scanner & your just as likely to damage the binding.

        Regards.
        Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

        Comment


          #5
          Re: Scanning magaznes without damaging the binding.
          I guess it depends on how they are bound ! I am currently going through the process of scanning in tons of docs. Most magazines and manuals are either stapled or cord-bound. I have a flat bed scanner, so they can be made to sit flat on the glass. With glue-bound docs there is a problem. You either have to bend the pages instead of the binding - which leaves a book which won't stay closed flat - or bend firmly at the binding and live with the fact that some will be disturbed. Hot-glue binding can be re-stuck by putting it into a hot binding machine, but the stringy rubber set-glue cannot.
          Fortunately, I have found that the binder-side margin is normally broad enough to be able to put most books or magazines onto the scanner glass, held down with a moderate weight, leaving a small enough amount of distortion in the scan for OCR software to cope okay. I am trying to convert some old manuals into OCR documents and find that modern OCR software does a pretty good job. The biggest hassle is the diagrams. I don't want to end up with bitmaps as the size is enormous and quality not brilliant, but haven't yet found any diagramming software which can translate images of diagrams into graphics vectors. What I need is ODR (optical diagram recognition) software - does any exist ?
          Kevin.

          Comment


            #6
            This might not be quite the answer you're looking for but- for a few pages from a magazine- you could use one of the newer USB scanners by Canon. They're VERY small and thin (a couple of other companies make them that size too). You can put the scanner at the edge of a table and let the magazine page that's not being scanned just hang over the edge. My wife's scanner only has like a quarter inch edge around the glass. It cuts out the distortion from being flattened as in a regular scanner. Like I said- this would still only be good for a few pages because it's still slow, but you could scan more than a page a minute. Good for that "you've got to see this article!" situations.

            Comment


              #7
              I did do some scanning recently that gave me some ideas but I need some time to pursue them more.

              Basically I wanted to scan some old bound manuals (similar binding to magazines) so I used a regular copier to duplicate them, page by page, onto individual sheets. I then used the sheet feeder on my scanner to scan in the pages.

              That works fine for B&W stuff, but I'd be unable to do color scans. . .

              Erik
              The Vintage Computer and Gaming Marketplace
              The Vintage Computer

              Comment


                #8
                "Erik" wrote in message:

                > I did do some scanning recently
                > that gave me some ideas but I
                > need some time to pursue them
                > more.

                > Basically I wanted to scan some
                > old bound manuals (similar
                > binding to magazines) so I used a
                > regular copier to duplicate them,
                > page by page, onto individual
                > sheets. I then used the sheet
                > feeder on my scanner to scan in
                > the pages.

                > That works fine for B&W stuff, but
                > I'd be unable to do color scans. . .

                Yes that was my experience when I
                first started playing with Scanners
                on the Macs. Forunately my work
                consisted it very little colour!

                Sadily, as you stated earlier they
                weren't exactly fast!
                Generic and Amstrad CPC based Programs written in Turbo Pascal 3

                Comment


                  #9
                  Scanners

                  Erik,
                  You say you would like to scan colour stuff... But is that essential?

                  The reason older scanners are so damn slow is that they have a single-line monochrome CCD, and rotate three different colour filters in front of it as they are scanning. In effect you scan the page three times! If your driver gives you a greyscale option, try it - I suspect you'll find it only takes about a third of the time to scan a full page. Also, for the purposes of creating a PDF of a manual to stick on the web, 200DPI is more than adequate; many of these drivers default to the scanner's maximum resolution (300dpi? 600dpi?) while 200DPI is about 60% more resolution than a "fine" fax, and because it's greyscale rather than monochrome carries much more visual information. For text-only documents, 150DPI is fine; "Letter Quality" dot-matrix printers were only 144DPI, and they were perfectly legible!

                  Comment

                  Working...
                  X